Shows

Paul Smith Spring 2020

For his 82nd show, Sir Paul Smith was in his element, focusing on the season’s big message, tailoring, a category he’s religiously stuck by throughout the whole streetwear phenomenon. “I’ve never not done tailoring, every one of my shows has had tailoring in it. I’ve always nudged it in,” the designer said backstage.
Here it hogged the limelight, with a run of very of-the-now, super Eighties, boxy silhouettes playing with proportions and colors, like the three-button suit and the ultra oversize, large and long double-breasted that he layered over looks like an outerwear piece. Folding in the odd hi-tech material, it was all worked in a beautiful color palette that made it really Paul Smith, juxtaposing neutral tones and daring monochromatic colors, including total looks of bright yellow, pink or cobalt blue.
Dubbed “Collage” in homage to the designer’s first trip to New York in the Seventies — “a time where a few of the uptown galleries, like Leo Castelli, OK Harris and Pace, were opening downtown” — the collection mixed technical and classic fabrics and a sprinkling of collage prints.
“People like [Willem] de Kooning and [Andy] Warhol and [Robert] Rauschenberg were starting to play with cutting stuff up, silk screens, stencils,

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/paul-smith/review/

      

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Kenzo Spring 2020

It was a swan song with water at its heart and inspiration from Japan’s female free divers, who scour the ocean floor for shellfish and sunken treasures. Carol Lim and Humberto Leon were bidding a poignant farewell after nearly a decade as creative directors, with dancers moving down the darkened catwalk in slow motion to reflect the passage of time, and a performance by Solange, who stepped onto the runway midway through the show, accompanied by a brass orchestra.
There was a lot to take in here, with dancers dressed in Kenzo archive looks dating from 2012 and wearing traditional, wooden Okobo sandals. The moving retrospective, which opened and closed the show, was choreographed by Léo Lerus. Some 5,000 guests attended, including members of the public, fashion students and Kenzo staff.
The show itself tried to capture the lives of the divers — known as Ama — with Neoprene shorts suits in orange, violet or black, and crumpled jersey tops and dresses with a wet look. Fluttery strips of fabric, like little waves, lined the front and back of a navy dress, while halter tops with puff sleeves had a liquid sheen.
One hoodie came with a toile de jouy like design and

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/kenzo/review/

      

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Ludovic de Saint Sernin Men’s Spring 2020

There were cock rings, leather briefs, bare torsos and just-visible butt cracks.
“He basically makes clothes to have sex in,” whispered a guest at the Ludovic de Saint Sernin spring 2020 show, held on the upper level of the Centre Pompidou museum with a panoramic view of the Parisian skyline that no one was paying any attention to.
The focus was very much on de Saint Sernin’s racy silhouettes, which managed to be both sexually charged and somewhat poetic.
Models opened the show wearing see-through organza suits that were stuck to their drenched skin, clinging onto every curve. They were followed by delicate knits with front and back “sweat patterns” made of different layers of fine merino wool; a polo shirt with a teardrop opening over the model’s left nipple and a Swarovski crystal-covered pair of flares, worn with nothing else.
“I told you it was going to be hot and humid,” laughed the designer backstage, adding that models were sprayed with water before hitting the runway, some with additional Swarovski crystals stuck to their bare skin to simulate beads of moisture. “The idea is that you don’t know if they have just come out of the water or they are sweating. It’s wet

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/ludovic-de-saint-sernin/review/

      

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Off-White Resort 2020

Virgil Abloh likes to say that his women’s collections for Off-White are inspired by the fashionable young women in his circle — think Gigi Hadid, who closed his Off-White men’s show in Paris this week, and sat front row at Louis Vuitton the following day.
So it came as a surprise that the women on his mood board this season were short, deeply wrinkled and dressed to withstand freezing sea conditions, rather than heading for dinner at Nobu. It turned out the resort lineup was derived from Hyung S. Kim’s photographs of female divers in South Korea.
Called haenyeo, most of them are aged over 60, and they have developed a style all their own: black or orange wetsuits layered with colorful printed tops, and weighted belts to help them sink faster. “There is this mix of layering, netting, workwear and neoprene that I was inspired by,” Abloh said.
Those weights inspired the pod-shaped belt bag strapped over a lime green Neoprene suit, while the wet suits were translated into spongy knit tops and play suits with ring pull zippers. Fish scale sequins glimmered on a spiral-cut slipdress, while high-heeled shoes came with surfboard-style ankle leashes.
There were times when the correlation between mood

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/resort-2020/paris/off-white/review/

      

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Lanvin Men’s Spring 2020

For Bruno Sialelli’s official men’s wear debut for Lanvin, his playful and youthful collection was full of tongue-in-cheek nods to leisurewear, with the show’s pool venue underscoring the escapist mood.
“I think we all need a holiday — I love my job, but holidays are the best moments of our lives,” the designer said backstage. “Traveling is part of the vocabulary of the house, Jeanne Lanvin got a lot of her inspiration from the trips she made — fabrics, things.”
Sprinkling in maritime influences here, a pinch of Jean Cocteau and Barbar there, the wardrobe went from tailoring with hand-painted wave motifs running down the sleeves and legs to cropped tobacco-hued toggled Windbreakers. There were also old-school checked wool jackets with sailor-style collars, cherry motif T-shirts and silky logo caftans. Washes added a sun-kissed feel to looks.
Delicate silver ball embroideries trimming suits and peppering shirts pointed to the bohemian Seventies era. But naive charm prevailed via knits embellished with rows of cloudy sheep, twinsets in matching seaside scapes and vacation-inspired trinkets, including whistle and mermaid necklaces, the latter inspired by an object in Jeanne Lanvin’s office. Bags resembled ice coolers.
The women’s pre-collection looks mirrored the men’s in terms of the inspirations, fabrics and

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/lanvin/review/

      

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Chalayan Men’s Spring 2020

Easy, cool and lightning-quick.
Hussein Chalayan’s show took place on a little pedestrian street across from his Mayfair store, and the setup was refreshingly simple, with all guests standing, Mother Nature providing the lighting and models carrying their own music, via little boomboxes that came straight from 1986.
There may have been a complex, interesting back story to the clothes — Chalayan is passionate about what he does, and his collections are often underpinned by sociopolitical and historical themes — but the collection itself was a breeze.
There were stripes galore, on suits with ties at the waist and down the leg, on cotton shirts and billowy or flat-front trousers and on collarless tops. Trousers and shorts were rolled at the bottom, some came with flaps or folds, while lightweight shirts were boxy or had rounded shoulders and elbow-skimming sleeves.
Silhouettes were languid and made for hot-weather climes, and Chalayan shaped them with a drawstring here and a snap, knot or buckle there.
While he may have begun with the idea of dance and movement among ethnic groups colonized by Western nations, and about the tensions between indigenous cultures and their occupiers across the centuries, he ended with the most democratic of collections, which should

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/hussein-chalayan/review/

      

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Studio ALCH Men’s Spring 2020

Environmentally conscious Australian designer Alexander Hackett was in tears after her debut show. The 26-year-old moved to London four years ago to pursue her fashion dream while working in places such as Footpatrol in Soho, where she bonded with the street and footwear community.
Her Spring 2020 collection features her fourth collaboration with Patta, a Dutch streetwear brand. Hackett deconstructed deadstock backpacks and make them into new fashion that Patta’s demographic would appreciate.
Her up-cycled approach to fashion also includes faux denim jackets made from heat pressed plastic bags she collected over the past decade. Models were carrying cutlery bags as well. One vest was even designed with various pockets to carry the wearer’s packed lunch. That’s some commitment to sustainability.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/studio-alch/review/

      

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Liam Hodges Men’s Spring 2020

The designer tore up the classics for this soft-edged, upbeat collection that was full of pastels, cartoonish faces, lots of fat or skinny stripes, and pattern mash-ups.
He worked with his friend, the artist Alfie Kungu, on colorful, abstract patterns. These included swirls of brown, black and olive spilling onto oversize grandpa cardigans and baggy trousers, or geometric color blocks splashed on military jackets.
Clothes were loose and fluid, with lightweight rugby shirts sprouting long, patterned sleeves in muted pastels, while baggy military trousers were cut open at the sides to reveal bits of leg, contrasting fabrics or patches. Knits ranged from the oversize and edgy — some with comical, cartoonish faces — to the sweet, as in a cotton-candy pink crewneck with a single butterfly at the front.
The designer, whose fingers were stained with red dye backstage after the show, said he wanted to explore “the low end of technology,” and worked with screen-printing and tie-dyeing, all of which gave this collection an arty, schoolboy charm and a punk edge.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/liam-hodges/review/

      

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8ON8, Presented by GQ, Men’s Spring 2020

Li Gong had big aspirations for his collection, which was “to provide a service to the dead” by referencing the popular “San Junipero” episode of the Netflix sci-fi series “Black Mirror.” The heavy concept translated itself into a lively, multicolored collection under the GQ China Presents platform.
Contrasting elements set the tone. Soft lilac and pale yellow hues softened up boxy and tailored blazers. Silk pajama-style shirts were toughened up with chain-link belts while graffiti-print shirts were cut in relaxed, long-line silhouettes.
Elsewhere, Gong introduced strong greens, purples and blues on striped shirts.
“I also want people in the afterlife to be able to dress how they want and live the life they always wanted and in turn, I want the audience to rethink their own identity,” mused Gong, who attached silk nightgowns to the backs of some shirts.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/8on8/review/

      

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Astrid Andersen Spring 2020

This season, Astrid Andersen skipped the London catwalk in a bid to dedicate more time to the design process.
“I’ve reached an age where I really do think it’s such a shame if I’m always rushed and I don’t enjoy it. And at some point, it will translate in the work,” said the designer.
She turned her attention to more delicate fabrics and handmade processes, delivering a series of track pants, trenches and sweaters in a striking dégradé organza. Each piece was individually dyed two to three times to reach the desired effect.
“It’s the idea of looking at a piece and appreciating that time and consideration went into it,” said the designer, who was inspired by the intricate detailing in Korean artist Do-Ho Suh’s organza installations.
Elsewhere, Andersen focused on nailing down core brand pieces, particularly comfortable and sporty silhouettes like hockey shirts, windbreakers and tracksuits, inspired by classic American athletic wear.
She reworked them with softer, more feminine elements such as dreamy pastel shades and an abstract leopard print layered under the brand’s logo.
Free from the demands of the catwalk, Andersen was able to offer a more focused range, highlighting what’s at the core of her brand.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/astrid-andersen/review/

      

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Prada Resort 2020

“Simplicity is rebellion.”
So said Miuccia Prada during a preview of the resort collection she showed on Thursday night. Prada referred specifically to the clothes, which she described as “naïve, cotton, simple,” but the thought extended to the event itself. At a moment when, in the luxury sweepstakes for sales and social media attention, her primary competition rents out major world monuments and airline terminals, Prada preferred to show at home. Or at one of her homes. In this case, her brand’s New York headquarters on 52nd Street overlooking the Hudson River. “I like to do the shows in my own spaces,” she said.
Yet while Prada may reject (for now at least) the kind of extravagant wanderlust of her competitors, this was no quiet little soiree. A star-studded guest list including Elle Fanning, Shailene Woodley, Uma Thurman, Naomi Watts, Joel Edgerton, Anderson Paak, Hailee Steinfeld, Marc Jacobs, Char Defrancesco and Sofia Coppola turned out, many reveling through four stages of festivities: boisterous pre-show cocktail, show, post-show informal dinner, after party.
Simple in its open concept and egalitarian flow — OK. Low-key — definitely not, offering an Instagrammable someone or something at every turn. Within that framework, Prada presented a lineup she characterized as simple

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/cruise-2020/new-york/prada/review/

      

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Chanel Cruise 2020

The invitation for Chanel’s cruise show was printed on a plain white card — symbolizing, perhaps, the blank page facing artistic director Virginie Viard as she prepared to write the next chapter in the history of the house that had been synonymous with Karl Lagerfeld for 36 years.
Guests arriving at the Grand Palais found a similarly low-key ambiance inside the venue. Its soaring steel-and-glass roof all but dwarfed the set, a retro train station where guests sat on wooden benches under signs bearing the names of cities that resonate in Chanel lore: Venice, Saint-Tropez, Rome or Edinburgh, among them.
An impulse kicked in to make a pun: All aboard the Chanel Express! But the space lacked the joyful effervescence of Lagerfeld’s bombastic sets, which invited guests to preen for selfies and journalists to conjure clichés about rocketships, icebergs, cruise liners or whatever phantasmagorical vision he dreamt up for the season.
“It’s very minimal,” one editor soberly observed. The press kit offered the first hint of change. A booklet, printed on glossy paper, featured images shot by Karim Sadli, marking the first time since 1987 that a photographer other than Lagerfeld had lensed the collection.
In it, hints of a lighter, more streamlined take

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/cruise-2020/paris/chanel/review/

      

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Nobuyuki Matsui Men’s Fall 2019

Name: Nobuyuki Matsui
Main message: The first clue that Nobuyuki Matsui’s first Tokyo Fashion Week outing was going to be something unusual was the invitation: a small cardboard box holding a single air pillow, on which details of the show were printed. When audience members arrived, they were asked to step over the back of long benches in order to reach their seats. The long, narrow runway was strewn with air packaging, some filled with goose down, which popped under the models’ feet, adding a strange kind of percussion to the soundtrack.
Some of the clothes also incorporated the pillow-like pouches, which were tied with strings to coats or stuffed inside a tan leather vest that was cut to look like another form of packaging material. But the concept didn’t run through the entire collection, and some looks of simple pants and shirts felt bland and unimaginative. More interesting was Matsui’s modern take on tailoring, which included pullover vests and suits with exposed stitching, contrast fabrics, and trousers that were either cropped or cinched with belts at the ankle.
The result: The collection showed ingenuity and a fresh take on some men’s wear staples, but it was inconsistent and would have benefited from

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/nobuyuki-matsui/review/

      

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Postelegant RTW and Men’s Fall 2019

Name: Postelegant
Main message: One of the six winners of the 2019 Tokyo Fashion Award, Yuya Nakata’s fledgling brand (established only two years ago) aims to make “timeless modern wear with the best materials and details.” For the brand’s first collection shown on the runway, it did just that. The silhouettes were classic and refined, including different cuts of long coats, tailored trousers and calf-length dresses. And while they were beautifully cut to move with the body, it was the fabrics that set them apart from simple basics. Wool blends in sky blue and red, ribbed knits in the perfect shade of medium gray, a fine, bone-colored twill, and a trio of cloths all in dusty pink all begged a second look.
The result: A newcomer on the Tokyo fashion scene, Nakata proved himself as one to watch with a collection that went beyond elegant to something new and undeniably modern.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/postelegant/review/

      

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Cinoh RTW and Men’s Fall 2019

Name: Cinoh
Main message: Takayuki Chino has been heading his own brands for over a decade, but as one of the winners of the 2019 Tokyo Fashion Award, he staged a runway show for the first time this season. With it, he showed his audience just why Cinoh has reached levels of popularity that many Tokyo brands can only hope for, being carried by top retailers across Japan.
The designer showed a relaxed, slightly disheveled sophistication. A leopard print, plush fleece pantsuit and long, fringed straight skirts for women shared the runway with men’s suits that were reimagined with pullovers in the place of button-front jackets. Long satin dresses, pleather overalls, fuzzy knits and easy fit trousers were given a subtle injection of Nineties grunge when paired with oversized plaid jackets and shirts. The theme was also hinted at in the show’s soundtrack, which included an instrumental backing track of Nirvana’s 1991 hit “Smells Like Teen Spirit.”
The result: With equal parts elegance and comfort, it was a collection that will surely resonate with Tokyo’s fashion-forward youth, without alienating older consumers.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/cinoh/review/

      

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Mistergentleman Men’s Fall 2019

Name: Mistergentleman
Main message: Always one of the bright spots during Tokyo Fashion Week, Takeshi Osumi and Yuichi Yoshii’s men’s brand mixed easy tailoring with streetwear, outdoor and women’s wear influences for fall. Models walked the grass-like carpeted runway in retro, relaxed snakeskin print suits paired with satin double-breasted shirts and neckerchiefs, or velvet pants with roomy overcoats. The more casual looks included dad jeans, hooded sweatshirts and duck canvas jackets, all in neutral shades of gray, brown, khaki and black, interspersed with pops of purple, green and orange.
Osumi and Yoshii played with proportions, shrinking trenches and puffer jackets into crop tops and styling them over wool coats and loose sweaters. Moto, letterman and toggle jackets were chopped up into bib-like pieces and layered over outerwear, while a series of coats and jackets were cut from two contrasting fabrics: olive corduroy and gray wool flannel, or plush fleece with the same snake print from earlier pieces. Subtle feminine touches came in the form of silk scarves worn as belts over coats, and a handful of equestrian print jackets and shifts. The brand also debuted its latest collaboration products, including quilted bags made with Outdoor Products and a black satin bomber designed

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/mistergentleman/review/

      

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The Reracs RTW and Men’s Fall 2019

Name: The Reracs
Main message: With her inaugural show during Tokyo Fashion Week, Naomi Kurahashi displayed just how to present classic pieces on a runway without boring the audience: make sure to have plenty of variety, use beautiful textiles, keep the pace quick, and employ inventive styling choices. The brand lived up to its profile, which says that it’s “backed by quality and practicality,” but proved that it has so much more to offer.
The collection was made up of variations on a pretty basic theme: straight-legged or relaxed, jogger-style trousers paired with V-neck sweaters or just about any kind of outerwear imaginable, all turned out in neutral tones of gray, black, navy, white and beige. But the superior construction and luxurious textiles elevated the collection beyond simple classics, with suiting material showing a drape resembling that of matte jersey, and a black pleather poncho turning more heads than it would have if it had been made from animal skin. The fabrics were so beautiful on their own that there was no need for flashy prints, but occasional flashes of Fair Isle, argyle or checked patterns kept things interesting.
The result: Kurahashi has been designing The Reracs for nearly a decade, but proved

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/the-reracs/review/

      

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Shiroma RTW Fall 2019

Name: Shiroma
Main message: Shiho Shiroma lucked out with unseasonably balmy weather for her outdoor fashion show, held right in the center of Shibuya, Tokyo’s most buzzing neighborhood. It was also a wise choice for a venue, as her clothes looked right at home in one of Japan’s fashion centers — although the logo-covered backdrop left much to be desired. She showed basics with a twist, mixed with less conventional pieces. Simple shift dresses were made interesting with structural belts and one-shoulder harnesses, some trimmed in frills. While overall the neutral-toned collection had a modern feminine feel, there were also ample military and athletic influences. Wide-leg olive pants and khaki trousers had snaps all down the outer leg, allowing them to be opened up so they billowed with movement, wool arm covers were reminiscent of skaters’ elbow guards, and bomber jackets were turned out in navy and mustard lace or cropped in burgundy satin with balloon sleeves. Ankle-length sweatshirt hoodies were splashed with botanical patterned embroidery and sequins, and cotton twill tanks, dresses and trenchcoats had overlays on one half of a gossamer-thin, sheer tech fabric.
The result: Just the right amount of asymmetry, mixed influences and contrasting textures made for an

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/shiroma/review/

      

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Keisukeyoshida RTW Fall 2019

Name: Keisukeyoshida
Main message: What do you get when you mix sharp tailoring and a wide range of textures with subtle bondage influences? Keisuke Yoshida’s latest offering, which was shown on a slick red runway with stairs in the center and models all with bandaged heads. A short suit with an oversize, double-breasted jacket was worn over pleather leggings punctuated with cutouts and buckles, while slinky dresses in headline printed mesh or lamé jersey were gathered all over for a balance of sexy and conservative.
There were structural elements as well, with tails of coats clipped to the backs of collars to create a vague origami effect, and sleeves that were either ballooned and extra long or topped with boned shoulder plates rivaling a football player’s padding. High-wasted pants with rows of rope fastened with toggles were paired with satin blouses trimmed in exaggerated Western-inspired yokes.
The result: Yoshida’s collection was just fantastical enough to find itself at home on the streets of Tokyo, without taking itself too seriously.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/keisukeyoshida/review/

      

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Hyke RTW Fall 2019

Name: Hyke
Main message: Yukiko Ode and Hideaki Yoshihara reimagined classic military pieces for fall, rendered in oversize proportions and tech fabrics. Voluminous toggle and shawl-collar coats in Army green and skirts made of swinging fringe shared the runway with structured jersey dresses that were striking in their simplicity. The designers also showed their latest collaboration items: eyewear by Julius Tart Optical, tote bags by Chacoli, wedges by Beautiful Shoes, and puffer jackets, long down coats and rain jackets by The North Face.
Ode and Yoshihara showed their skills with sumptuous outerwear that was both cozy and elegant, as well as beautifully draped dresses and asymmetric knits that came alive with movement. Their textures were equally rich, ranging from corduroy and wool flannel to fur and technical fabrics.
The result: The collection had a clear point of view and beautifully constructed clothes, once again demonstrating why Hyke is one of the strongest brands in Japan at the moment.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/tokyo/hyke/review/

      

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