Shows

Cerruti 1881 Men’s Fall 2019

Jason Basmajian stuck to urban territory for fall, familiar landscape for the label as he continues to fashion it as a modern and upscale option. His uses the term “elevated sportswear.”
“The cross-pollination between sportswear and tailoring has always been a very natural DNA to the house — I think we keep refining and detailing it down,” he said, speaking backstage before the show.
Down the runway, he sent a handsome, belted suit jacket in pinstripes, fetched from the archives and refined for a contemporary audience. In a sign he’s reaching to meet a lasting fixation with outerwear, the options multiplied as the show advanced: trenches, an exquisitely tailored windbreaker, a structured puffer coat for women and the finest leather jackets — one eye-catching bomber had a gathered leather waist and panels of silky fabric. Accessories held their ground, expanding even, to include a tablet bag and a camera bag.
“It’s quite deceptively simple in a lot of ways,” Basmajian said, noting the workmanship and choice of fabrics behind the lineup, which in addition to the puffer offered more pieces for women.
Sabina Sciubba of the electronic dance group Brazilian Girls animated the show with a performance, singing in three languages.
New management led by

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/cerruti-1881/review/

      

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Lemaire Men’s Fall 2019

Christophe Lemaire took a tailored turn, hanging onto all of his signature soft edges, as he added some structure. There was an early Seventies breeze blowing through the collection with silky, wide-collar shirts, broad lapels and trousers that were wide, straight-legged or cropped and boot-cut.
Other suits were done in tailored flannel felt or bottle green denim with a workwear feel. Softness came in the form of pajamas with a Florentine marbled paper print, part of an ongoing collaboration with Sunspel, ribbed cotton turtlenecks and alpaca coats with toggles or brightly colored flecks. Lemaire held his presentation at École Duperré, a school for the applied arts, where he works with fashion students, helping to educate them about the industry.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/lemaire-3/review/

      

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Ann Demeulemeester Men’s Fall 2019

A rock vibe infused this collection, which was filled with billowing shirts and jackets, languid robes and jacquards on the one hand, and black leather trousers, T-shirts and chunky boots on the other.
Creative director Sébastien Meunier said he had in mind the decade before the rise of the Antwerp Six, when the Belgian city was a hotbed of artists, galleries and musicians. “They were so exciting,” he said backstage. “They were really like anarchists, punky, etc., and they were trying a lot of stuff. [Artists] were really making a strange mix, and everything was free.
“At this moment, the Antwerp Six appeared, and Ann Demeulemeester said there’s no good rock music without anarchy, and there’s no good fashion without anarchy and rebellion,” continued Meunier, who wanted to show for fall “a more tough way, a more punk way that we also have in our blood — something more rock.”
This he brought across artfully and effectively, like with the loosely belted pink silk robe worn over navy trousers and under a long brown fur coat. Or the strapless, flowy black dress paired with black leather pants and lace-up boots.
By mixing the Ann Demeulemeester label’s traditional tailoring, black-and-white color code and silks with

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/ann-demeulemeester/review/

      

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Dior Men Fall 2019

For his third Dior Men collection in eight months, Kim Jones set up camp at the foot of the Eiffel Tower in a monumental rectangular black tent that loomed against the setting sun.
Having commissioned artists to create giant sculptures for his debut in Paris in June and his pre-fall show in Tokyo in November, this time he let the venue be the statement. His fall line, featuring a collaboration with U.S. artist Raymond Pettibon, was shown on static models ferried past guests on a 250-foot-long conveyor belt.
As Daft Punk’s “Musique” sent the subwoofers shuddering, the first look emerged: a gray suit layered with a tactical vest hand-embroidered with Pettibon’s owl design. Jones said it was no relation to the “gilets jaunes” — the antigovernment protesters known for their distinctive yellow vests who threaten to disrupt the Paris men’s shows on Saturday, prompting Dior to move its display forward by one day.
“When we were looking for show venues, we were just looking at the statues around Paris with all the armor, and I thought it would be nice to see what something over a suit would look like — so that’s where it comes from. It’s not a reference to what’s

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/dior-homme-collection/review/

      

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Boris Bidjan Saberi Men’s Fall 2019

Boris Bidjan Saberi relayed Mongolian and Persian influences for fall, adding flavor to his precise, military-inspired designs. The silk road was awash with primary materials like copper and silver, he noted backstage following the show, and he decided to train his sights on the oxidation process.
Strips of copper decorated the faces of the models — “soldier makeup” in the designer’s words, with patches of aquamarine blue added to complete the closing number: a tailored jacket and shorts ensemble, in this bright blue, with a furry yak vest, in a silvery hue, strapped on top. High-top boots, also dyed in the prerequisite hue, completed the look, while sturdy straps reined in the silhouette, adding to the utilitarian feel. “My technical roots come from military garments — this is a driving force of the collection,” he said. The military bent was certainly back in full force this season.
The dyeing process — color! — was another underlying theme, as the lineup gradually shifted from grays and silvers to include pale blues before leading to an emphatic aquamarine.
The carefully considered choice of materials — yak wasn’t the only leather; there was also horse and kangaroo — and the accessories — small purses attached to

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/boris-bidjan-saberi/review/

      

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Berluti Men’s Fall 2019

Way to make an entrance: 10 months after taking the helm at Berluti, Kris Van Assche showed his debut collection for the luxury label on Friday against the opulent backdrop of the Palais Garnier in Paris, in front of an audience presided by Bernard Arnault.
To say the stakes were high is an understatement. Van Assche was the only designer from last year’s game of musical chairs at parent company LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton that had yet to showcase his creations on the runway, after Kim Jones at Dior, Virgil Abloh at Louis Vuitton and Hedi Slimane at Celine.
Those who have followed his career, including his recent 11-year tenure as creative director of Dior Homme, were in for a surprise. Known for opening his shows with a signature black suit, Van Assche instead nodded to Berluti’s roots in footwear by bowing with a brown leather suit hand-dyed to mirror the luxury label’s patinas.
Those dyes also seeped into the color palette of the collection, with models ascending the sweeping staircase of the 19th-century opera house decked in flamboyant reds, pinks, yellows, blues and greens.
“If my previous work always started with a black suit, I can definitely say that here it starts

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/berluti/review/

      

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Comme des Garçons Homme Plus Fall 2019

Aren’t there enough anarchists in Paris, with the gilets jaunes planning more disruption for the 10th Saturday in a row and violent protestors getting in on the act, too? Come Saturday morning, shop windows will be boarded up once again, while on Friday night police were already gearing for more trouble.
Rei Kawakubo clearly thought there was room for a few more dark rebels, sending out a goth punk collection complete with inky black lips and fingernails and models wearing jangling harnesses, grabbing their crotches and giving the finger to photographers like a bunch of petulant teenagers.
There’s been a punk undercurrent running through Paris this season, with latex rippling and snapping its way through some collections, and classic clothing that’s been torn-up or somehow corrupted. That current has been running counter to the gentle, slouchy tailoring and warm colors that have been lapping over the runways, pushing street wear out to sea.
Kawakubo’s collection, which unfolded in a dark room that thumped with a live performance by the Los Angeles-based electronic duo Vowws, was mostly black. It offered up lots of the brand’s signature pieces, including dramatic white shirts and tailcoats, long and short. There were some nice dresses, too, columnar in

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/comme-des-garcons-homme-plus/review/

      

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Vetements Men’s and Women’s Fall 2019

“We ended up realizing that the geeks have become the new punks by inventing the smartphone, something that changed the whole world,” said Demna Gvasalia, tackling a new subject on the Vetements runway: the Internet, especially the Darknet. That includes “all the crazy, scary things that we can acquire there or use in the backstage of what we know as the Internet. How far can it go?”
It came through partly in the graphic work and slogans on hoodies and T-shirts that Gvasalia has been using since the start of the label. He used the T-shirt — “a product that is part of the fashion vocabulary, like it or not,” he reasoned — as a sounding board for what he and members of his team have on their mind and how they see the world. Slogans ranged from, “I survived swine flu, now I’m vegan,” to “Made in Europe,” with as one of the key graphics a president-themed stamp. Backpacks were decorated with scary faces, complete with creepy floor-sweeping trails of hair, while shrugs were made from disemboweled teddy bears.
Gvasalia said, “after five years doing Vetements, looking for my Balenciaga, my Vetements, separating those things and making sure I enjoy doing those

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/vetements/review/

      

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Angus Chiang Fall 2019

Angus Chiang wants us to get our five-a-day. The Taiwanese designer recreated a traditional market from his home country under the Alexandre III bridge, blaring out retro tunes by local star Billie Wang and lining up guests alongside cartons of real fruit and vegetables, which people were free to bag up and take home after the show.
The collection, which featured both men’s and women’s looks, was an eye-popping affair: orange, Chiang’s signature color, was everywhere, from a denim boiler suit to hoodies and knitted sleeveless tops printed with a design that seemed straight off a juice carton. Bar codes on the back of T-shirts confirmed the link: “Fruit and clothes are a daily necessity,” said Chiang backstage. “Going to the supermarket to buy your fruit is the same thing as getting dressed everyday.”
Colors were loud and zingy: periwinkle blue, citrus yellow and cotton candy pink were used both on clothes and smeared on the models’ faces. Trousers were held together with metal staples, referencing the way cardboard boxes are made in Taiwan. Fruit-printed T-shirts were created in collaboration with Fruit of the Loom and models wore trainers designed in partnership with Nike.
Some models wore elbow-length plastic gloves, others traditional rice

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/angus-chiang/review/

      

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Sulvam Fall 2019

Teppei Fujita looked to the Thirties, borrowing the era’s suit jackets and rearranging them to fit his universe for the coed lineup for fall. Rule-breaking serves as the starting point for collections at Sulvam, and so it went, with the designer continuing his push against the streetwear tide. Bowler hats, clips for suspenders and dark suits — streetwear of another period, also marked by chaos — were references. These he transformed, with the addition of a pair of thick, brown, fleecy sleeves worn over a suit coat in one instance, and paired with a clear plastic side bag, in another.
A sprinkle of camouflagelike patterns felt fresh, with splashes of stark colors, which he used for suits, trench coats and matching head scarves. Last season’s profusion of polar fleece took on new forms, including foot-covering brown leggings — a new take on tights.
He references the classic women’s cardigan suit, citing its symbolism of female empowerment. Here he loosened the silhouette, applied external seams and added matching bright purple pants. The ensemble was worn by a male model — gender-fluidity is another house code. Considering work by Diane Arbus, the row of models included a set of twins, a nod to one

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/sulvam/review/

      

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Casablanca Men’s Fall 2019

The name alone telegraphs an exotic vibe, and the clothes followed, channeling a dandy, gangster-rap flavor with double-breasted suits in tan and browns or rich jewel tones worn over tracksuits.
Charaf Tajer for his catwalk debut kept the shapes pretty simple and the content lively, with a fun old school-chic feeling also coming through sprinkled with sissy touches, like the guy in a midnight-blue silk satin pajama clutching a chihuahua or all the pinks toward the finale.
The tongue-in-cheek prints and motifs were great, from the towering plate of oranges on a black sweater to the crab knit, the white denim looks printed with Champagne and cigars, suitcases and trunks or Greek columns, and the Lyon silk shirts swirling with zodiac signs.
The storyline evolved into a sea of pink and berry colors ending with a silk summer shirt in a print depicting the columns of the terrace of some fancy hotel or billionaire’s villa with sea views. Having opened with a variation based on a plane flying over some exotic destination at night, and palm trees, it closed the loop on a collection filled with lightness, humor and escapism.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/casablanca/review/

      

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Sean Suen Men’s Fall 2019

Sean Suen had a powerful storyline for fall, but the clothes also stood strong on their own.
He named the collection Ghost Town, after his childhood home of Fengdu in China, now covered by the waters of the Three Gorges Dam. The town still exists in his mind, which he continues to explore as a memory. To symbolize its gradual disappearance, Suen offered fraying edges and a fading gray color scheme on a simple, felted trouser and sweater set. For the move to higher ground, the model was equipped with an oversize, chunky knit bag in a silvery gray, slung over one shoulder, stretching down to skim the ankle.
In contrast was knitwear from childhood photographs, wavy stripes drawn on a collared sweater, in a hot-cold color palette of orange, mustard, gray and black.
Suen operates in elegant territory as reflected in this lineup, which proves especially relevant as men’s fashion edges upward. Sleek suits carried an element of deconstruction, a house signature, with a broad panel that cut across the chest diagonally, like a stiff blanket skewed to the side, but carrying certain elements of the jacket, like a breast pocket. One panel in black, quilted velvet jutted out further than usual,

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/sean-suen-2/review/

      

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Dries Van Noten Men’s Fall 2019

Add Dries Van Noten to the ranks of designers dialing back the sportswear this season. The show notes for his fall collection promised “a view on tailoring for the next generation” and “a step back from nonchalance and sportswear.”
It opened with a sequence of sartorial staples: a white shirt and tie, a pin-striped suit and a charcoal wool coat. Van Noten soon introduced a note of visual disruption, in the shape of tie-dye patterns that bloomed across sweaters, jeans and suits.
They were most striking in psychedelic bursts on silky reversible raincoats. Seemingly random, the patterns were in fact engineered to be “hyper optic and exactingly symmetric.” Together with a graphic carpet motif, they added a dash of Sixties bohemia to a display otherwise focused on subtle ways for a man to draw attention.
Those included a striking new suit shape, which paired a short jacket, with crisp shoulders and a high and narrow waist, with wide pleated pants. Also intriguing: the asymmetric quilted jackets that wrapped around the body like down comforters, and wool blankets that were wrapped around the waist like skirts.
The takeaway message: Being smart doesn’t have to be uncomfortable. Underlying it all was a suggestion that men need

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/dries-van-noten/review/

      

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Maggie Marilyn Pre-Fall 2019

“I guess two, two and a half years in it’s like, ‘What’s next?’ We manufacture in New Zealand, have a transparent supply chain, always are looking at fabric innovations…but as a brand, how do we progress and grow that still feels sustainable? Because it feels a little bit weird to say, ‘Ah, we’re sustainable,’ but we’re growing and putting more product into the world,” Maggie Marilyn contemplated. But for 2019, the sustainability maven is expanding her efforts even further.
For her latest collection, made up of high summer and pre-fall counterparts, Marilyn’s process comes not from one big overarching concept, but from sustainability, as well. “Looking at each individual garment and thinking, ‘How can we improve this in every way for the customer and for the people that make it?’” she mused. Even her fresh color palette was derived from her mom’s garden, where growing up she was taught how to grow beautiful things without the use of harmful pesticides and insecticides and later, subconsciously lead to her current state as a designer. The lineup held a more simplified ease than prior seasons — knotting details in place of overtly feminine ruffles and colorblocking in place of stripes. Dresses and skirts

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/maggie-marilyn/review/

      

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MP Massimo Piombo Men’s Fall 2019

Milan’s storied, centenarian Jamaica café strewn with local punters was the perfect setting for Massimo Piombo’s latest presentation. Grouped in a side room stood a cluster of mannequins in bohemian looks that jumbled washed knits, plaid blanket skirts and colored wool coats tied with a mix of scarves in vivid retro printed silks and textured wools.
As usual, the old school cloths did all the talking, from the overcoats in deep blue alpaca, mohair and cashmere blends from Hungary or a dark green Austrian wool typically used for bed plaids to a bordeaux scarf in Peruvian mohair edged with Mexican red silk embroidery.
“I’m a nomad, I like to travel the world to create a small dream,” said the designer of his punk-panache styling. He recalled a dinner thrown in the venue by Vogue Italia’s late Franca Sozzani. “She told me ‘Massimo, this is your place,’” he said.
“The place is unique. All the artists used to come to work here in the Fifties, Sixties, Seventies, to smoke, exchange and write. It’s one of the most eccentric places.”

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/milan/mp-di-massimo-piombo/review/

      

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Aldo Maria Camillo Men’s Fall 2019

Naming its collection “Roots,” Aldo Maria Camillo, one of Pitti Uomo’s guest designers this season, set the tone for his debuting show, staged at Florence’s Stazione Leopolda. As he revealed in his show notes, the Nineties and their minimalism served as inspiration for the designer, who delivered a commercially savvy collection centered on well-executed men’s staples. Memories of Camillo’s youth converged in his fashion aesthetic, where a sharp-cut leather coat matched with white pants seemed to be a tribute to Helmut Lang. Suits and coats were juxtaposed with leather trousers, simple striped T-shirts, shearling jackets and leopard print pants to create a wardrobe echoing references to iconic music and movie stars, such as James Dean, Kurt Cobain and Bob Dylan. While he walked on the safe side, Camillo demonstrated to have great design and merchandising skills. Adding a bit more of excitement and individual vision might be the goal for his next effort.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/milan/aldo-maria-camillo/review/

      

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Antonio Marras Pre-Fall 2019

For pre-fall, Antonio Marras created a focused collection, controlling his flamboyant creativity to explore all the different merchandise categories.
While the designer restrained the number of inspirations and the quantity of prints and themes, the collection didn’t miss any of the brand’s signature elegance and artistic sophistication.
An English pinstriped suiting fabric was crafted for jackets, dresses and coats — their mannish sartorial appeal softened by the artisanal patchwork of vintage fabrics — while the graphic appeal of fluid frocks and separates worked in a chic checkered pattern created a contrast with the inserts in a feminine floral motif. This was also rendered on soft wool peacoats, sweaters and cozy maxi cardigans cinched at the waist with coordinating belts.
Marras’ signature lace dresses were coated for a shiny yet discreet metallic gold effect, while chic fluid pants and tops were made from a soft velvet printed with vibrant flowers.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/milan/antonio-marras/review/

      

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Fila Fjord Fall 2019

Following on Fila’s big-bang hook-up with Fendi, and its first runway show in Milan in September, the debut collection of the brand’s new premium-positioned label with a sustainable bent, Fila Fjord, headed by Copenhagen-based designer Astrid Andersen, played out as a pared down, minimalist spin on suburban normcore, with a deliberate downplaying of logos.
The presentation, held at the Palazzo Borghese, felt subversive, with the clothes placed on plain white mannequins, accentuating the line’s genderless, ageless vibe, and the rich decor — chandeliers included — muffled in recycled plastic. The soundtrack to “Twin Peaks” gently twanged in the background.
Said Elgar Johnson, fashion director of British GQ Style, who also worked on the collection: “Because we were showing streetwear and because of the way people cast now, I think you can be very easily tricked into thinking that’s who should be wearing it, so we wanted to keep it as plain as possible. These clothes are for anyone.”
The main idea, he added, was to explore where streetwear is headed. “Because the market is so saturated with it, everyone’s going to be experimenting with what happens next,” he said.
For Andersen that meant developing clothes that have a direction, “and not just building a

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-fall-collections-2019/paris/fila-fjord/review/

      

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Theory Pre-Fall 2019

Pre-fall marks Francesco Fucci’s third collection for Theory, and he continues to nudge forward its American sportswear legacy with refinement, sensuality and a modernist élan. Novelty came via subtle and chic injections of utility details on spare silhouettes, grounding the collection in reality.
Realism, in fact, has been a touchstone for Fucci as he seeks to elevate Theory. Tailoring has been softened, fabrics are wrinkle-free and there’s a sense of ease that allows women to carry the garments work-to-dinner without worry. The reality check extends to the look book, where jackets and even coats were tied around the waist to mirror the way young women dress and to show that the elegant clothes aren’t so precious or serious.
“I’m not reinventing anything,” Fucci said during a walk-through. “I’m exploring more of the basis of what we created the past two seasons: refining, construction, optimizing.”
On one hand, he focused on the casualization of tailoring — suiting with clean patch pockets, a trench with button snaps, or a robe coat over a denim-looking jacket and pant set that served as a great example of modern sportswear. On the other hand, there was feminine allure in the silky, boudoir-leaning dresses made for day, as in

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/theory/review/

      

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No. 21 Pre-Fall 2019

Mannish references and a winter maritime inspiration coexisted with Alessandro Dell’Acqua’s signature sensual femininity in the No. 21 pre-fall collection. The first theme resulted in cozy outerwear in striped patterns with a Nordic naval feel, as well as in knits decorated with anchor-shaped intarsia. Tiny anchors also appeared on the buttons punctuating a minidress with fluid long sleeves, as well as on a pair of glossy pants matched with a striped T-shirt. Coated inserts embellished the sleek peacoats, while shearling was used inside-out for cozy outerwear. Moving toward the more feminine, Dell’Acqua introduced leopard prints and silicon fringes on coats, frocks and pencil skirts, while a lingerie-inspired flair informed see-through tulle dresses and silk camisoles enriched with lace details.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/milan/no-21/review/

      

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