Shows

Roland Mouret Resort 2020

For Roland Mouret, it’s all in the drape. The designer worked Seventies-inspired makeup colors into this collection of fluid, draped, feminine clothing. He put the focus on fabrics including wool crepe, stretch viscose and hammered satin, the latter of which made for flowing handkerchief hems on a skirt; breezy, sensual slipdresses, and the generous, draped sleeves on plissé or striped blouses.
Mouret said he wants women to use his clothes as a tool to define and express themselves, whether that’s for work or not. There were tailored pieces here, too, including a long crepe coat in fire engine red, and a lineup of unfussy suits with thick, karate-style belts and wide-leg trousers, in solid colors like purple, or checks. A silver lamé jumpsuit inspired by the glitter ball added a dash of Seventies spice to the mix.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/resort-2020/london/roland-mouret/review/

      

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Onitsuka Tiger RTW and Men’s Spring 2020

Japanese sports and streetwear brand Onitsuka Tiger staged its spring show in an indoor running stadium on an island in Tokyo Bay. The festivities began with a marching band, wheel acrobatics and dancers who flew through the air doing backflips and the like. And with the 2020 Summer Olympics being hosted by Tokyo, creative director Andrea Pompilio drew inspiration both from the city and from past editions of the Games.
“This season is a big homage to Tokyo because it’s going to be the Olympic Games of 2020,” Pompilio said. “The collection is going to be in the stores at that time, and that’s the reason why you see a lot of luggage. Because for me it’s like all the world is coming here and Tokyo has become a really big center of the world. For the Olympics but also because Tokyo at the moment is a really big center of creativity and a very inspiring city for so many people.”
The luggage Pompilio mentioned was made of slick vinyl in the Olympic colors and emblazoned with either retro or modern looking logos. Shapes ranged from cosmetic bags to Boston bags.
“Another big inspiration is about all historical and past Olympic Games from

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/spring-ready-to-wear-2020/tokyo/onitsuka-tiger/review/

      

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RABD Men’s Spring 2020

Name: RABD
Main message: A former design assistant for John Galliano, Kanya Miki founded his brand in 2017 and this season marked his second showing during Tokyo Fashion Week. He still made a common rookie mistake, sending out at least twice as many looks he should have if he wanted to avoid repetition and losing his audience’s attention.
Roomy silhouettes dominated Miki’s runway. Pants were extra long, pleated, and cinched at the waist, sometimes with long cords or chains that trailed behind as the models walked. Outerwear, too, was oversize, whether it took the form of faux leather bombers so long they nearly reached the knee or denim overcoats with bunched up sleeves. Even cropped suit jackets had shoulders so wide that they hung from the models’ frames.
The result: Despite the repetition and sheer volume of the collection, it showed a clear direction and was an interesting new take on the casual-meets-tailoring trend that has become common among streetwear brands.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/spring-ready-to-wear-2020/tokyo/rabd/review/

      

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Gut’s Dynamite Cabarets RTW and Men’s Spring 2020

Name: Gut’s Dynamite Cabarets
Main message: After a nearly seven-year hiatus from Tokyo’s runways, the designers who go by the names Cabaret Aki and Jackal Kuzu were back for spring, this time with their new partner W Woods Showko. Their collection had a retro, rock ‘n’ roll-meets-hippie vibe to it, with floral caftans and printed maxi skirts shown alongside ruffled blouses, ripped jeggings, and leopard-print blazers. There was a riot of color and pattern, from multicolored zigzags to a black all-over logo print over a bright pink background. Long fringe-trimmed skirts, dresses and ponchos.
During a break from the traditional runway show, the designers sent out groups of street dancers, nontraditional models, and wrestlers wearing pieces from GCGX, the brand’s new sports line. Heavy on logos, there were sweatsuits, T-shirts, shorts and leggings in either black and white or a red, blue and yellow multicolored print.
The result: As the finale soundtrack — “Fight for Your Right” by the Beastie Boys — suggested, this was a high-energy show that certainly brought the fun. The clothes themselves were a bit more toned down than the brand’s previous fare, but will likely do well on a commercial level.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/spring-ready-to-wear-2020/tokyo/guts-dynamite-cabarets/review/

      

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Mitsuru Okazaki RTW and Men’s Spring 2020

Name: Mitsuru Okazaki
Main message: Inspired by Seventies rock ‘n’ roll style, Mitsuru Okazaki sent out a compact collection of slim suits and separates with an edge. Roughly half a dozen black unisex pantsuits were accented with bold white contrasts in the shape of circles, stars, arrows, guitars, or strips of cotton tape arranged in the style of a Napoleon jacket. Black tank tops and bell bottoms printed or embroidered with guitars took a literal interpretation of the theme, while bright pink satin shirts with basketweave detailing and pants with their seams on the outside made the look feel more modern.
The result: It was a tight collection with a clear theme that nonetheless had enough variety in just over 20 looks that it kept the audience’s attention.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/spring-ready-to-wear-2020/tokyo/mitsuru-okazaki/review/

      

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Paul Smith Spring 2020

For his 82nd show, Sir Paul Smith was in his element, focusing on the season’s big message, tailoring, a category he’s religiously stuck by throughout the whole streetwear phenomenon. “I’ve never not done tailoring, every one of my shows has had tailoring in it. I’ve always nudged it in,” the designer said backstage.
Here it hogged the limelight, with a run of very of-the-now, super Eighties, boxy silhouettes playing with proportions and colors, like the three-button suit and the ultra oversize, large and long double-breasted that he layered over looks like an outerwear piece. Folding in the odd hi-tech material, it was all worked in a beautiful color palette that made it really Paul Smith, juxtaposing neutral tones and daring monochromatic colors, including total looks of bright yellow, pink or cobalt blue.
Dubbed “Collage” in homage to the designer’s first trip to New York in the Seventies — “a time where a few of the uptown galleries, like Leo Castelli, OK Harris and Pace, were opening downtown” — the collection mixed technical and classic fabrics and a sprinkling of collage prints.
“People like [Willem] de Kooning and [Andy] Warhol and [Robert] Rauschenberg were starting to play with cutting stuff up, silk screens, stencils,

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/paul-smith/review/

      

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Kenzo Spring 2020

It was a swan song with water at its heart and inspiration from Japan’s female free divers, who scour the ocean floor for shellfish and sunken treasures. Carol Lim and Humberto Leon were bidding a poignant farewell after nearly a decade as creative directors, with dancers moving down the darkened catwalk in slow motion to reflect the passage of time, and a performance by Solange, who stepped onto the runway midway through the show, accompanied by a brass orchestra.
There was a lot to take in here, with dancers dressed in Kenzo archive looks dating from 2012 and wearing traditional, wooden Okobo sandals. The moving retrospective, which opened and closed the show, was choreographed by Léo Lerus. Some 5,000 guests attended, including members of the public, fashion students and Kenzo staff.
The show itself tried to capture the lives of the divers — known as Ama — with Neoprene shorts suits in orange, violet or black, and crumpled jersey tops and dresses with a wet look. Fluttery strips of fabric, like little waves, lined the front and back of a navy dress, while halter tops with puff sleeves had a liquid sheen.
One hoodie came with a toile de jouy like design and

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/kenzo/review/

      

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Ludovic de Saint Sernin Men’s Spring 2020

There were cock rings, leather briefs, bare torsos and just-visible butt cracks.
“He basically makes clothes to have sex in,” whispered a guest at the Ludovic de Saint Sernin spring 2020 show, held on the upper level of the Centre Pompidou museum with a panoramic view of the Parisian skyline that no one was paying any attention to.
The focus was very much on de Saint Sernin’s racy silhouettes, which managed to be both sexually charged and somewhat poetic.
Models opened the show wearing see-through organza suits that were stuck to their drenched skin, clinging onto every curve. They were followed by delicate knits with front and back “sweat patterns” made of different layers of fine merino wool; a polo shirt with a teardrop opening over the model’s left nipple and a Swarovski crystal-covered pair of flares, worn with nothing else.
“I told you it was going to be hot and humid,” laughed the designer backstage, adding that models were sprayed with water before hitting the runway, some with additional Swarovski crystals stuck to their bare skin to simulate beads of moisture. “The idea is that you don’t know if they have just come out of the water or they are sweating. It’s wet

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/ludovic-de-saint-sernin/review/

      

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Off-White Resort 2020

Virgil Abloh likes to say that his women’s collections for Off-White are inspired by the fashionable young women in his circle — think Gigi Hadid, who closed his Off-White men’s show in Paris this week, and sat front row at Louis Vuitton the following day.
So it came as a surprise that the women on his mood board this season were short, deeply wrinkled and dressed to withstand freezing sea conditions, rather than heading for dinner at Nobu. It turned out the resort lineup was derived from Hyung S. Kim’s photographs of female divers in South Korea.
Called haenyeo, most of them are aged over 60, and they have developed a style all their own: black or orange wetsuits layered with colorful printed tops, and weighted belts to help them sink faster. “There is this mix of layering, netting, workwear and neoprene that I was inspired by,” Abloh said.
Those weights inspired the pod-shaped belt bag strapped over a lime green Neoprene suit, while the wet suits were translated into spongy knit tops and play suits with ring pull zippers. Fish scale sequins glimmered on a spiral-cut slipdress, while high-heeled shoes came with surfboard-style ankle leashes.
There were times when the correlation between mood

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/resort-2020/paris/off-white/review/

      

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Lanvin Men’s Spring 2020

For Bruno Sialelli’s official men’s wear debut for Lanvin, his playful and youthful collection was full of tongue-in-cheek nods to leisurewear, with the show’s pool venue underscoring the escapist mood.
“I think we all need a holiday — I love my job, but holidays are the best moments of our lives,” the designer said backstage. “Traveling is part of the vocabulary of the house, Jeanne Lanvin got a lot of her inspiration from the trips she made — fabrics, things.”
Sprinkling in maritime influences here, a pinch of Jean Cocteau and Barbar there, the wardrobe went from tailoring with hand-painted wave motifs running down the sleeves and legs to cropped tobacco-hued toggled Windbreakers. There were also old-school checked wool jackets with sailor-style collars, cherry motif T-shirts and silky logo caftans. Washes added a sun-kissed feel to looks.
Delicate silver ball embroideries trimming suits and peppering shirts pointed to the bohemian Seventies era. But naive charm prevailed via knits embellished with rows of cloudy sheep, twinsets in matching seaside scapes and vacation-inspired trinkets, including whistle and mermaid necklaces, the latter inspired by an object in Jeanne Lanvin’s office. Bags resembled ice coolers.
The women’s pre-collection looks mirrored the men’s in terms of the inspirations, fabrics and

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/paris/lanvin/review/

      

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Chalayan Men’s Spring 2020

Easy, cool and lightning-quick.
Hussein Chalayan’s show took place on a little pedestrian street across from his Mayfair store, and the setup was refreshingly simple, with all guests standing, Mother Nature providing the lighting and models carrying their own music, via little boomboxes that came straight from 1986.
There may have been a complex, interesting back story to the clothes — Chalayan is passionate about what he does, and his collections are often underpinned by sociopolitical and historical themes — but the collection itself was a breeze.
There were stripes galore, on suits with ties at the waist and down the leg, on cotton shirts and billowy or flat-front trousers and on collarless tops. Trousers and shorts were rolled at the bottom, some came with flaps or folds, while lightweight shirts were boxy or had rounded shoulders and elbow-skimming sleeves.
Silhouettes were languid and made for hot-weather climes, and Chalayan shaped them with a drawstring here and a snap, knot or buckle there.
While he may have begun with the idea of dance and movement among ethnic groups colonized by Western nations, and about the tensions between indigenous cultures and their occupiers across the centuries, he ended with the most democratic of collections, which should

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/hussein-chalayan/review/

      

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Studio ALCH Men’s Spring 2020

Environmentally conscious Australian designer Alexander Hackett was in tears after her debut show. The 26-year-old moved to London four years ago to pursue her fashion dream while working in places such as Footpatrol in Soho, where she bonded with the street and footwear community.
Her Spring 2020 collection features her fourth collaboration with Patta, a Dutch streetwear brand. Hackett deconstructed deadstock backpacks and make them into new fashion that Patta’s demographic would appreciate.
Her up-cycled approach to fashion also includes faux denim jackets made from heat pressed plastic bags she collected over the past decade. Models were carrying cutlery bags as well. One vest was even designed with various pockets to carry the wearer’s packed lunch. That’s some commitment to sustainability.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/studio-alch/review/

      

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Liam Hodges Men’s Spring 2020

The designer tore up the classics for this soft-edged, upbeat collection that was full of pastels, cartoonish faces, lots of fat or skinny stripes, and pattern mash-ups.
He worked with his friend, the artist Alfie Kungu, on colorful, abstract patterns. These included swirls of brown, black and olive spilling onto oversize grandpa cardigans and baggy trousers, or geometric color blocks splashed on military jackets.
Clothes were loose and fluid, with lightweight rugby shirts sprouting long, patterned sleeves in muted pastels, while baggy military trousers were cut open at the sides to reveal bits of leg, contrasting fabrics or patches. Knits ranged from the oversize and edgy — some with comical, cartoonish faces — to the sweet, as in a cotton-candy pink crewneck with a single butterfly at the front.
The designer, whose fingers were stained with red dye backstage after the show, said he wanted to explore “the low end of technology,” and worked with screen-printing and tie-dyeing, all of which gave this collection an arty, schoolboy charm and a punk edge.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/liam-hodges/review/

      

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8ON8, Presented by GQ, Men’s Spring 2020

Li Gong had big aspirations for his collection, which was “to provide a service to the dead” by referencing the popular “San Junipero” episode of the Netflix sci-fi series “Black Mirror.” The heavy concept translated itself into a lively, multicolored collection under the GQ China Presents platform.
Contrasting elements set the tone. Soft lilac and pale yellow hues softened up boxy and tailored blazers. Silk pajama-style shirts were toughened up with chain-link belts while graffiti-print shirts were cut in relaxed, long-line silhouettes.
Elsewhere, Gong introduced strong greens, purples and blues on striped shirts.
“I also want people in the afterlife to be able to dress how they want and live the life they always wanted and in turn, I want the audience to rethink their own identity,” mused Gong, who attached silk nightgowns to the backs of some shirts.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/8on8/review/

      

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Astrid Andersen Spring 2020

This season, Astrid Andersen skipped the London catwalk in a bid to dedicate more time to the design process.
“I’ve reached an age where I really do think it’s such a shame if I’m always rushed and I don’t enjoy it. And at some point, it will translate in the work,” said the designer.
She turned her attention to more delicate fabrics and handmade processes, delivering a series of track pants, trenches and sweaters in a striking dégradé organza. Each piece was individually dyed two to three times to reach the desired effect.
“It’s the idea of looking at a piece and appreciating that time and consideration went into it,” said the designer, who was inspired by the intricate detailing in Korean artist Do-Ho Suh’s organza installations.
Elsewhere, Andersen focused on nailing down core brand pieces, particularly comfortable and sporty silhouettes like hockey shirts, windbreakers and tracksuits, inspired by classic American athletic wear.
She reworked them with softer, more feminine elements such as dreamy pastel shades and an abstract leopard print layered under the brand’s logo.
Free from the demands of the catwalk, Andersen was able to offer a more focused range, highlighting what’s at the core of her brand.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2020/london/astrid-andersen/review/

      

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