Beauty Headlines

'I flip the male gaze on its head': the woman behind Cynthia Nixon's viral video

By Kate Finnigan

Claire Rothstein’s Be a Lady They Said is a fashion film for the #MeToo generation and an unflinching look at the impossible standards forced on women

Within six days of being posted on Vimeo and Instagram, the fashion film in which Cynthia Nixon reads a poem about the impossible standards imposed upon women had amassed 20m views around the world and been shared by Cara Delevingne, Dua Lipa and Madonna.

Going viral was one thing, but the Madge seal of approval is another – Claire Rothstein, the British photographer and publisher of the fashion magazine Girls Girls Girls, which is behind the Be a Lady They Said video, is “lying down and breathing” when I contact her. “We thought it might get a response, but it’s been completely mad,” she says.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/28/i-flip-the-male-gaze-on-its-head-the-woman-behind-cynthia-nixons-viral-video

      

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How to wear the 70s look | Jess Cartner-Morley

By Jess Cartner-Morley

It was the decade that style forgot – but now a more polished version of the 70s is possible

The 1970s have improved with age. We are in the middle of a month of catwalk shows and along the front row, the flared hems pool like bridal trains and the chocolate-and-beige colour palette makes every selfie look sepia-filtered. But there is no tie-dye, nor crocheted tank tops. Definitely no kipper ties. This season’s 70s look is smart-casual, not hippy-dippy.

This is good news. I make an effort to be open-minded, within reason, but tie-dye is an aesthetic crime for which there is no excuse. It’s a certain kind of bad-fancy-dress-party 1970s fashion which has given an entire decade a bad name. The latest take on this era is smart and polished. It carries a whiff of Elnett hairspray, not incense.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/28/how-to-wear-70s-look-jess-cartner-morley

      

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The best trenchcoats for all ages – in pictures

By Styling: Melanie Wilkinson Photography: David Newby

A trench will always be a spring staple. This season, if you’re investing in a new style, think colour. Soft blue and green tones work perfectly with beige and navy, while a subtle colour block is modern and interesting

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/gallery/2020/feb/28/the-best-trenchcoats-for-all-ages-in-pictures

      

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Met museum to mark 150th year with time-themed fashion show

By Hannah Marriott in Paris

New York exhibition will make case for fashion as a time-bending force, says curator

“For what more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the current moment?” wrote Virginia Woolf in her 1928 time-travelling classic, Orlando. “That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

These ever-relevant words, and other Woolf passages, would soundtrack the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s next major exhibition, its curator, Andrew Bolton, said at a press launch in Paris on Thursday.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2020/feb/27/met-metropolitan-museum-art-new-york-mark-150th-anniversary-time-themed-fashion-show

      

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Tell us: have you not bought clothes for more than 10 years?

By Guardian community team

We’re interested in hearing from people who haven’t bought any clothes for the last 10 years

Konnie Huq has revealed that she hasn’t bought any clothes in 10 years. We’re interested in hearing from people who can beat that record or who have items of clothing they still wear that are more than 10 years old.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/27/tell-us-have-you-not-bought-clothes-for-more-than-10-years

      

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'Oh my goodness!': from jockstraps to codpieces, how menswear got sexy

By Priya Elan

While the dominant ideal of male sexuality might be Love Island-style hench, a louche, slinky look is raising eyebrows in fashion

• Read more from the spring/summer 2020 edition of The Fashion, our biannual style supplement

Traditionally conservative in how much flesh it exposes, menswear has now hoisted itself on to the podium, wearing tassels and dipped in Vaseline, and announced a new era that is soft focus and tight fitting.

Leading the strut is 29-year-old Ludovic de Saint Sernin, who has quickly become a name to know, thanks to a now-infamous moment in his SS20 show when he sent a model down the catwalk wearing only a white towel. A throwback to the gay bathhouse era of the 70s, the video went viral. Vogue reported that a woman in the audience squeaked, “Oh my goodness” as he sauntered past. Welcome to menswear’s New Sexy.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/27/oh-my-goodness-from-jockstraps-to-codpieces-how-menswear-got-sexy

      

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Lanvin looks back to go forward in chic Paris fashion week show

By Hannah Marriott

Designer Bruno Sialelli draws on couture house’s rich history to deliver a solid collection

That France’s oldest surviving couture house was founded by a woman raised in poverty, as one of 11 children, is a narrative that feels ripe for mythologising.

The story of Jeanne Lanvin has recently lain dormant, however, after five years of creative and financial turmoil at a house that was once the pinnacle of Parisian fashion.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/26/lanvin-looks-back-go-forwards-chic-paris-fashion-week-show

      

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Turn back time? What it means to wear a watch in the era of mobile phones

By Words Eva Wiseman, styling Melanie Wilkinson, photography Louisa Parry

As the need for watches has waned, the timepiece has become a wrist-based statement. Wearing one now can feel like a coded message

• Read more from the spring/summer 2020 edition of The Fashion, our biannual style supplement

I can tell the time. Honestly, the big hand, etc, the little hand and so on. I can definitely, absolutely tell the time, but a moment came, around 20 years ago, when I realised… I no longer had to.

One side-effect of the rise of mobile phones was that clocks became decorative and watches irrelevant. As years passed, and my own life transitioned from blood and air to thumb and screen, the need for their very existence became questionable. If I needed to tell the time, I would glance to the top of whichever piece of glass I was using and in the small cracks in between, the shallow minutes when I was walking from one screen to the next, well, I could wing it, perhaps by measuring the angle of the sun.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/26/turn-back-time-what-it-means-to-wear-a-watch-in-the-era-of-mobile-phones

      

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Dior show opens with commentary on the patriarchy

By Jess Cartner-Morley in Paris

Dior designer uses sophisticated optics to pitch the brand as conscious and engaged

Because Christian Dior loved flowers and nature, he took the tulip as inspiration for his dress patterns and bottled the scent of Lily of the Valley as Diorissimo. But in the 21st century, the house he founded broadcasts its affections on a grander scale.

Dior have partnered with the Louvre museum to finance a five-year restoration project of the Tuileries Gardens. Financial details of the patronage have not been disclosed, but when Paris fashion week opens with the Dior name emblazoned on a temporary structure the size of a provincial railway station in the centre of one of the oldest and most elegant public parks in Paris it seems fair to assume a hefty sum is involved.

Fashion is now much bigger than mere clothes and Christian Dior, one of the most powerful brands of the moment, has both the ambition and the economic might to claim a seat at the table in conversations ranging from feminism to climate change. Along with stablemate Louis Vuitton, Dior was given credit by the luxury powerhouse LVMH for last year’s “exceptional growth”, which saw group revenue increase 16% to €38.4bn in the first nine moments of 2019.

Cheekbones and champagne are no longer sufficient to dazzle catwalk audiences. Dior designer Maria Grazia Chiuri has adopted much more sophisticated optics, pitching the brand as conscious, engaged and value-driven – identities which appeal to modern consumers.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/25/dior-show-opens-with-commentary-on-the-patriarchy

      

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Pump up the volume: why massive sleeves are this year's biggest trend

By Hannah Marriott

Unmissable sleeves – with their ruffles, puffs and frills – are ballooning across the catwalk and the high street. And there’s no sign of the trend deflating

Oversized sleeves shouldn’t be a viable trend. They come stuffed with social and logistical questions. Such as: is it possible to hug those you love while wearing a top that resembles giant arm bands? And: how can you possibly squeeze a pair of huge sleeves into the arms of your coat? (Answers: no; and you can’t.) And yet the big sleevification of fashion is in full swing regardless.

Last week’s Milan catwalks were full of sleeves the diameter of dinner plates. Elongated puffs of fabric covered the arms, like the trunk of a squid, at Fendi. At MaxMara, dresses came with drop-shouldered puff sleeves and bomber jackets with multilayered frills that recalled sea anemones.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/25/pump-up-the-volume-why-massive-sleeves-are-this-years-biggest-trend

      

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The Ashford hair boom: how does one market town support 28 hair salons?

By Dale Berning Sawa

After it was revealed that the town in Kent has 28 hairdresser’s for only 75,000 people, we sent a reporter to find out why

Ashford in Kent made the news this week when someone counted the number of hairdresser’s in the town: 28, eight of which are huddled together on a 200-metre stretch of the high street. That is an awful lot of stylists for a place with a population of only 75,000. It raises the question: is this market town with a Eurostar station an untapped source of styling excellence?

When I visit Ashford, I am greeted by a lot of short back and sides and woollen hats, a messy ginger up-do and some copper-coloured box braids coiled into a bun. A slender woman with an auburn blow-dry, sunglasses perched on top, gets into the passenger seat of a car. Another with a wet-look perm, dyed black and shiny, walks past a tall guy waiting in line to pay for parking: tight fade, baseball cap, absolutely stellar facial hair and mismatched socks.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/shortcuts/2020/feb/25/the-ashford-hair-boom-how-does-one-market-town-support-28-hair-salons

      

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Gok Wan: 'I once wore head-to-toe beige – I looked like a Ford Cortina!'

By As told to Leah Harper

The TV presenter on his style inspirations, his love of homemade clothes and why fashion shouldn’t be taken too seriously

This was my look for the ITV Gala in 2016. I am wearing a Maison Margiela dinner jacket that I put shoulder pads in, trousers by Zara and boots from Yves Saint Laurent. I have got a Chanel clutch, Marks & Spencer gloves – and I made the scarf on the morning of the gala. I remember thinking it needed something else, but I had no time to go home or go shopping. I was working at This Morning and there was an old dress that had been hanging around for months, so I added some fringing I found in their haberdashery department. I have worn that scarf probably more often than anything else in my wardrobe.

I love stuff that is homemade and has a story behind it way more than buying couture or designer. One of my favourite shirts is from Asos: it is blue flannel and I embroidered loads of words on it – most of them are too rude for me to wear it on TV.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/25/gok-wan-i-once-wore-head-to-toe-beige-i-looked-like-a-ford-cortina

      

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Hockney muse Celia Birtwell: 'Nobody else has ever asked to draw me'

By Hadley Freeman

The textile designer is the artist’s most famous muse, posing for him since the 1960s in paintings that have become iconic. Ahead of a major Hockney show, she talks about the joy and sadness behind their creation

The first time textile designer Celia Birtwell modelled for David Hockney, she was, she says, terrified. “Look, that’s a very nervous me,” she says, pointing to a 1969 ink drawing titled, simply, Celia in Paris. “We were in an apartment in Paris – I think it belonged to Tony Richardson. It was so tranquil but I was terrified of doing something wrong.”

Given this was to be the first of hundreds of portraits he made of her, she obviously did something right.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/feb/25/tate-david-hockney-muse-celia-birtwell-nobody-else-has-ever-asked-to-draw-me

      

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Fluid and fashionable: V&A shakes up image of 'traditional' kimono

By Jess Cartner-Morley

Exhibition shows off rich history of Japanese garment in all its three-dimensional glory

More than 100 kimonos, from Freddie Mercury’s favourite cherry-blossom-pink lounging robe to gold-embroidered ceremonial silks worn by Japanese samurai, are to go on display this Saturday in a major exhibition entitled Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk at the V&A in London.

The exhibition, which also includes original Star Wars film costumes and designs by Yves Saint Laurent, John Galliano and Alexander McQueen, begins in Edo-period Japan: walls are painted in a shade called ”green tea” and fluttering white noren, the traditional fabric room-dividers that hang in the doorways of shops and restaurants in Japan, hover above the 400-year-old antique kimonos.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/feb/24/fluid-and-fashionable-va-shakes-up-image-of-traditional-kimono

      

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The Victoria’s Secret ‘woke’ rebrand is only skin deep | Priya Elan

By Priya Elan Other lingerie brands have embraced less prescriptive beauty ideals and diversity. Victoria’s Secret is scrambling to keep up

Victoria’s Secret seems to be having a change of heart. The lingerie brand’s Instagram, typically a stream of pink underwear and mainly white waifish models, looks different: the models are racially diverse and smiling, the colours are calming and autumnal, the lingerie is styled in a noticeably looser way. There’s a visual subtext of female solidarity, and the captions speak to a beauty ideal that is open rather than prescriptive.

It’s in keeping with an apparent volte-face that began in 2019. After years of promoting uniform beauty standards, spurning trans women and being accused of failing to protect models from sexual misconduct, the brand cancelled its runway show – broadcast annually since 1995 – and launched a campaign in partnership with the lingerie label Bluebella, which pledged to “encourage self-love, self-respect and self-worth. Because everybody is worth celebrating”.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/feb/24/victorias-secret-woke-lingerie-diversity

      

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The upside-down headband – why back to front dressing is the latest fashion trend

By Priya Elan Wearing your pyjamas to work, showing your bra or doing your buttons up wrong once meant you probably got dressed in the dark. Now they are exciting new looks

My experience of getting dressed in the morning is often tempered by the fact that the lighting in my bedroom is terrible. I often put on trousers the wrong way round, socks are mismatched and T-shirts inside out. I’m not alone. Many of us have similar tales of wrongly sized bras and jumpers on inside out. But on the catwalk it’s a different story. In the season-after-season hamster wheel of reinvention, anything goes. Take the Fendi show last week in Milan, in which models sported headbands upside down on the back of their heads. It makes you wonder what else you could have been wearing wrong for years.

The fashion website Man Repeller recently featured a piece about “reverse layering”, which recommended styling hacks including wearing a skirt over a dress, denim shorts over swimming trunks and a lace bra over a man’s shirt. Meanwhile, the New York label Proenza Schouler recently showed models wearing “misbuttoned” jackets and Gucci continued the trend for reappropriating BDSM harnesses as tops.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/shortcuts/2020/feb/24/the-upside-down-headband-why-back-to-front-dressing-is-the-latest-fashion-trend

      

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My boyfriend’s wedding dress unveiled my own shortcomings over masculinity

By Emily Halnon

I’m quick to blame men for their toxic behavior, but in this case, I, the woman, was part of the problem

My gaze scanned the colorful racks of clothing and stopped abruptly on something I’d never expected to see: my boyfriend was clutching a wedding dress – that he wanted to buy for himself.

“Emily!” he cried with victorious glee. “I’ve found the one!”

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/feb/24/my-boyfriend-wedding-dress-unveiled-shortcomings-masculinity

      

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Should we ration fashion? Lessons in sustainability from the second world war

By Clare Farrell

Fashion culture now would benefit from studying the ‘make do and mend’ attitude of the second world war, says Extinction Rebellion co-founder Clare Farrell

• Read more from the spring/summer 2020 edition of The Fashion, our biannual style supplement

A wartime-style economy is often cited as a potential path towards meeting our international carbon emissions agreements. In debates about the fashion industry, the idea of a shift as radical as the one that took place in the second world war is frequently mooted in conversations about sustainability.

Clearly this is a problematic comparison. It is important not to romanticise the violence of war or glamorise the reality of political states of emergency. But there is a reason the idea keeps being raised. The war is the most recent time in which the economy was overhauled in the face of an existential threat. It is the closest demonstration we have that quick, radical change is possible if we all come together.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/feb/24/should-we-ration-fashion-lessons-in-sustainability-from-the-second-world-war

      

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