Beauty Headlines

Virgil Abloh criticised for response to looting during George Floyd protests

By Priya Elan

Off-White and Louis Vuitton designer accused of not ‘reading the room’ in Instagram post about damage caused to streetwear shops in Los Angeles

The fashion designer Virgil Abloh has been criticised for his response to the looting of two luxury shops amid protests against the killing of George Floyd.

Under an Instagram video posted by the designer Sean Wotherspoon, showing Wotherspoon’s looted streetwear shops in Los Angeles, Round Two and Vintage by Round Two, Abloh wrote: “This disgusts me … We’re part of a culture together. Is this what you want?? When you walk past [Wotherspoon] in the future please have the dignity to not look him in the eye, hang your head in shame …”

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/jun/01/virgil-abloh-criticised-for-response-to-looting-during-george-floyd-protests

      

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Why is everyone wearing shapeless dresses post-lockdown? Blame that Zara dress …

By Hadley Freeman

It seems we’re all spinning around the parks in the same ankle-length, sack-like garments we probably bought last autumn – they may be comfortable, but let’s not pretend they are flattering

I’ve finally left my house for the first time in 10 weeks and … every woman seems to be wearing the same dress. Is this one of the conditions of easing lockdown?
Samantha, by email

Yes – did you miss that daily briefing? It was issued by Matt Hancock, before laughing in a dead-eyed hysterical manner that is weirdly reminiscent of when the people of Gotham became infected by the Joker’s poison in Tim Burton’s Batman. Come to think of it, Dominic Cummings does have something of the chaos-loving Joker about him. It would certainly explain his otherwise inexplicable outfits.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/jun/01/why-is-everyone-wearing-shapeless-dresses-post-lockdown-blame-that-zara-dress-

      

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Selected Works: the fashion photography of Glen Luchford – in pictures

By Jo Jones

From Kate Moss boxing on an LA street to his work for Prada in the late 90s and recent campaigns for Gucci, a new virtual exhibition of work from the British photographer’s 30-year career is on view until 30 June

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/gallery/2020/may/31/selected-works-the-fashion-photography-of-glen-luchford-in-pictures

      

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The Chiffon Trenches by André Leon Talley review – the emperor strikes back

By Rachel Cooke

The former editor-at-large of Vogue dishes the dirt on his old boss Anna Wintour in delightfully over-the-top fashion

Not many of us are able to stitch a straight line from the dreams of childhood to our accomplishments as adults. But André Leon Talley can. As a boy, the writer of The Chiffon Trenches liked nothing more than to retreat to the library in downtown Durham, North Carolina, where he would then proceed carefully to examine the glossy pages of Vogue, revelling quietly in a world in which “bad things never happened” and Truman Capote seemed always to be throwing a party. Even today, he can remember how he loved to gawp at Gloria Vanderbilt in her little suits by Mainbocher, her Elizabethan-style ruffs by Adolfo, her pleated gowns by Fortuny (the latter she kept in coils, like snakes).

Cut to 2007. Talley, who has been working in magazines ever since he joined Andy Warhol’s Interview as a receptionist in 1974, is now US Vogue‘s editor-at-large, in which capacity he is walking the red carpet at the Met gala, an annual ball thrown to raise funds for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s costume institute, and the gleaming jewel in New York’s social crown. This year, the evening, which has been overseen by his boss and longtime friend, Anna Wintour, the editor of Vogue, is themed around Paul Poiret – and, naturally, Talley is sporting an entirely appropriate salute to the great French couturier. Inspired by a costume worn by Merle Oberon in The Scarlet Pimpernel, and designed by Karl Lagerfeld, this floor-length cape of navy silk faille trails gloriously behind him, giving him the appearance of some crazy latter-day emperor – which, of course, he is, in a way.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/may/31/the-chiffon-trenches-by-andre-leon-talley-review-the-emperor-strikes-back

      

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Naked truths: nudes for every skin type | Funmi Fetto

By Funmi Fetto

Finding the right nude for your face can be tricky. Here’s how to wear the look without looking comatose. Plus, a cleansing oil that actually works

The term “nude” in the context of beauty is something I have always found problematic. “The perfect nude” in particular does not exist. There is instead a family of “nudes” that runs the gamut from pale pinks and peaches to caramels, browns and even mauves. Generally speaking, fairer skins should stick to the lighter end, but darker skin tones can wear shades across the spectrum. There are caveats, however. If opting for pinks, sidestep chalky undertones and balance with a slightly darker lip pencil. And avoid full-on beige – it makes everyone, including fairer skins, look comatose.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/may/31/naked-truths-nudes-for-every-skin-type-funmi-fetto

      

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Want to stand out on screen? Zoom in on that colossal collar…

By Ellie Violet Bramley

From the waist up – which is often all that matters in lockdown Britain – big and bold is best in the fashion stakes

A look that brings to mind either William Shakespeare or Harry Hill is not one that immediately suggests sophisticated glamour. But big collars are having a resurgence, this time on women’s dresses, tops and jumpsuits.

The current look is less Renaissance bard and more pious puritan, and can be dramatic in scale, reaching the shoulders or even down to the belly button.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/30/want-to-stand-out-on-screen-zoom-in-on-that-colossal-collar

      

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Erdem Moralioglu: ‘As a child all I wanted was a Coke and a hot dog’

By Genevieve Fox

The designer, 43, on his heritage, twin sister, belief in beauty and why he never cries at films

Time is very weird at the moment. It’s elastic, but in terms of creativity I am always as much about the here and now as about looking at art and things from the past. I love both.

As a child in the suburbs, I tried to avoid anything that was team-related. I had a very brief career, from the age of eight, on a football team, and I tried ice hockey. My father dreamed I might be the first half-Turkish hockey pro. It came to nothing. I spent most of my time drawing and daydreaming.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/may/30/erdem-moralioglu-as-a-child-i-wanted-what-i-could-never-have-a-coke-and-a-hot-dog

      

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The best new online beauty brands | Sali Hughes

By Sali Hughes

Try stylish vegan skincare from Typology and quality customised makeup from Il Makiage

It seems extraordinarily optimistic to announce major new brand launches in such uncertain times for business, especially when household names are collapsing (RIP Warehouse, beloved purveyors of lovely, affordable dresses with sleeves). But both Typology (skincare) and Il Makiage (makeup) are ideally conceived for the moment.

Typology is the brainchild of Ning Li, founder of made.com. Having disrupted the furniture market, Ning is set on transforming how we buy skincare. Every Typology product is vegan, ethically sourced and manufactured, comes direct to the consumer at under £15 and is packaged in flat, rectangular bottles that post through the letterbox, to save on delivery (a lot like those new online florists). Lined up, they look exquisitely stylish on the bathroom shelf.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/30/the-best-new-online-beauty-brands

      

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Lost Stock: 'It's like buying your future self a present'

By Joanna Partridge

A scheme to help Bangladeshi garment workers through the lockdown adds spice to fashion

It’s not fashion shopping as we know it: shoppers provide details of their age, gender, size and colour preferences, and hand over £39. A few weeks later a box arrives on your doorstep containing at least three items, with full ticket prices adding up to at least £70, that were once destined for stores like Topshop.

This is coronavirus crisis fashion shopping. The fashions come direct from the Bangladesh factory where the items were made and the mystery boxes are designed to provide a financial lifeline to the businesses and workers who supply big high street names.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/30/lost-stock-its-like-buying-your-future-self-a-present

      

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How to mix pink into menswear | Priya Elan

By Priya Elan

Forget bubblegum, shocking and magenta. Instead think watermelon and salmon – soft shades that work with any outfit

When I was a teenager, I went through phases of wearing earthy neutral colours: a sad camel, a lonely khaki, a misanthropic beige. There’s an old photo of me that resurfaced on a WhatsApp thread in which I’m wearing olive trousers, an olive zip-up fleece and olive-coloured glasses. Unsurprisingly, I look like an olive. It was, in retrospect, screamingly bland, while also stern – and not in a good way.

At that time, I thought bright colours were ridiculous, not for me, or something that works for Grover from Sesame Street. Neutrals were safe; a comfort zone of invisibility, blending in and fading away, which is what lots of 14-year-olds want to do.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/29/how-to-mix-pink-into-menswear

      

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How to wear a belted blazer | Jess Cartner-Morley

By Jess Cartner-Morley

A blazer is the perfect weight for the British summer – and the belt gives it a bit of va-va-voom

Look. I’m dressed! Properly dressed. Being properly dressed hasn’t been a thing since it was coat weather, so I feel a bit out of the loop, to be honest. I haven’t been paying my usual close attention to the plot of Fashion with a capital F. You know that thing when you start watching the latest episode of your current Netflix series and it dawns on you that you must have dozed off somewhere before the end of the last one, because there are whole subplots that are lost on you and characters who you’ve never seen before and, well, you’ve slightly lost the thread? That’s me right now, trying to work out what to wear.

But a belted blazer makes sense right now. A blazer is smart, but not in a jazz-hands kind of a way. Also, it is the perfect weight of outerwear for much of the British summer. Yes, a denim jacket is, too, but the blazer was made iconic by Yves Saint Laurent and the denim jacket by Britney Spears. Just saying.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/29/how-to-wear-a-belted-blazer

      

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Fashion retailer Boohoo buys out stake in Pretty Little Thing

By Sarah Butler

Online brand’s share price rebounds as it buys 34% stake owned by Umar Kamani

Boohoo has bought out a minority stake in its Pretty Little Thing brand for more than £260m just days after criticism over a potential deal.

The online fashion specialist said it was paying an initial £269.8m – potentially rising to £323.8m – for the 34% stake in Pretty Little thing owned by Umar Kamani, the son of Boohoo’s chairman and co-founder Mahmud Kamani, and business partner Paul Papworth.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/may/28/fashion-retailer-boohoo-buys-out-stake-in-pretty-little-thing

      

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Hair today: the rise and stay of the lockdown fringe

By Morwenna Ferrier

If ‘haircut’ has been the most Googled beauty treatment in lockdown, it is the fringe that has had the most attention. From Normal People to Angela Rayner, DIY bangs are the new normal

As our contact with the outside world shrinks to the size of a screen, once-private things have been pushed to the fore.

Our bookshelves, formerly unseen by our co-workers, have become pregnant with meaning. Our tired faces, once optimised for the workplace with concealer and a fancy neckline, are beginning to crack after one too many Zoom meetings. For those of us working from home, headshots are the new hemlines.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/28/hair-today-the-rise-and-stay-of-the-lockdown-fringe

      

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What to wear at a wedding – fashion archive, 28 May 1994

By Harriet Quick

28 May 1994: Once upon a time, a wedding had rules but now anything goes. Harriet Quick finds out how people prepare for the big day

Writing in Etiquette: The Blue Book of Social Usage, in 1955, social arbiter Emily Post baldly pronounced on suitable attire for a wedding: “Women wear street-length day dresses before noon. At noon and up to six o’clock, skirts may be longer. Hats are a requirement and gloves are correct.”

Men, on the other hand, Post decreed, may wear dark grey or blue business suits in place of morning suits at most weddings, but she believed white linen or light grey flannel was far more suitable for country weddings.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/28/what-to-wear-at-a-wedding-fashion-archive-1994

      

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Boohoo forced to defend itself from activist shareholder

By Sarah Butler

Hedge fund specialising in short positions accuses fashion retailer of misleading investors

Boohoo has defended its accounting practices after criticism by an investor known as the “Dark Destroyer” hit the online fashion specialist’s share price.

The ShadowFall hedge fund led by Matthew Earl, a specialist in taking positions that bet against a company’s share price, issued a 54-page report accusing Boohoo of misleading investors about profits and cashflow.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/may/27/boohoo-forced-to-defend-itself-from-activist-shareholder

      

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The nostalgic value of the bucket hat

By Priya Elan

This summer headgear is back. Again. But for many wearers, it never went away

The bucket hat may be back – searches have gone up by 36% since last month (according to Lyst) while there has been a 51% increase in searches on eBay – but it never really went away.

Recently seen on Billie Eilish, Diplo, Meryl Streep in the film Laundromat and at the spring/summer shows of Bode, Kate Spade and Anna Sui, it is ideal lockdown wear: great for hiding a headful of curls that has been untouched by the hand of a hairdresser.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/27/brimful-fun-why-bucket-hat-is-back-lockdown-summer

      

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French dressing: how cooking became the new couture

By Jess Cartner-Morley

Lockdown has seen the fashion world pivot from frocks to food, with models and designers sharing their favourite recipes online

Here are a few things that I have not done during the past two months. Wear high heels. Pick out a handbag because it works with a certain outfit and transfer contents into it from another bag. Go to the dry cleaners. Think about what I’m going to wear tomorrow. Change from a day to evening look, except on days when I have still been wearing my morning exercise gear at 6pm – and even then, I haven’t always bothered.

And here, on the other hand, are a few things that I have done: made a souffle for the first time ever. Through trial and error, nailed a failsafe béarnaise sauce. Pitted bowls of cherries for clafoutis. Eaten a salad made from rocket and radish leaves that I grew myself.

Making dinner is the new getting dressed in my lockdown life. Friday early evening once meant a drive-by visit to the kitchen for a G&T, and then upstairs for the serious business of trying on eight different dresses before putting the first one back on again. Now, my day-to-night change means putting my hair into a ponytail so that I can cook, and then it’s straight to the kitchen. The deliveries I get excited about aren’t from Net-a-Porter, they are from the local butcher – and are almost as expensive, unfortunately. Instead of blisters on my feet from wearing my Prada sandals, I have welts on my forearms from being a klutz with a paella pan. The seasonal drops in stores I get excited about these days? Asparagus and alphonso mangoes.

It’s not that I’m wearing disgusting clothes, I should add. I still love a nice summer dress on a sunny day and I have not gone a day without earrings. But without the context of where you are going out to, to do what, and with whom, and what they will be wearing, and how you are getting there and where you might end up later – without all that, getting dressed is a lot less spicy.

A simple diet of sundresses and sandals leaves me with time and headspace that I am sating by cooking. My love of clothes and fashion is always much less about shopping than it is an endless conversation inside my own head, and that conversation is much less involved than it usually is. For example: I have a pair of trousers that I used to think of as my “slightly nicer dog-walking trousers”. Now they are just “my trousers”. So the time I used to spend thinking about clothes and dressing up, is now all about recipes and cooking.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/may/27/french-dressing-how-cooking-became-the-new-couture

      

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