Shows

Cushnie Pre-Fall 2019

A Cartier ad, an Eddie Murphy movie and Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang. It sounds like a mixed bag of references, yet Carly Cushnie managed to extract a common thread of opulence to inform her lovely pre-fall collection, brimming with sensual dresses for which the brand is known and a key expansion of daywear.
The Cartier ad was by Jean Larivière in the Fifties, where a leopard slinks its way inside a store, representing a type of otherworldly glamour you can only dream of. It led the designer to think about the late Eighties comedy “Coming to America,” where Murphy plays a prince coming to New York from a made-up African country. Mixed together, they provided Cushnie with a recipe for light Eighties silhouettes and overall posh gloss, seen in exaggerated shoulders throughout and the draped tulle sleeves of a fabulous little black dress.
Cai Guo-Qiang’s “Heritage” piece of 99 animals sharing a watering hole informed the color palette and use of mixed prints. The mixed print dresses and skirts were the most captivating upon first glance, featuring asymmetric construction offsetting animal prints, colorblocking and pleats. But monotone dresses with sculptural lines and fluid construction proved to be more seductive, like a red

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/cushnie/review/

      

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Nili Lotan Pre-Fall 2019

Nili Lotan’s core aesthetic is, and has always been, a modern, fluid take on the Seventies rocker sensibility, which the designer knows to her core. She lived it, she wears it, she continually redesigns it. So for pre-fall, it came as no surprise that Lotan found no need for a specific theme or inspiration. The designer also mentioned fast-paced growth and wider exposure for the company, online and in brick-and-mortar, recently adding Nordstrom to her stockists and claiming to be one of the top-selling ready-to-wear brands on Barneys.com. With the brand’s growth came an established collective of core pieces, named NL Core, which in result, has given Lotan more drive and freedom to experiment with her four rtw collections.
For pre-fall, this meant adding prints and playing with new fabrics. “Where before I’d have one print, now I have three.…Two pieces of leather, now I have purple suede and leather,” she described. “I step a bit out of my own comfort zone, where before maybe I was sticking to my own and now I’m like, ‘OK, let’s go a little wider.’” Experimenting paid off, including a grape colored turtleneck paired with snakeskin knee-length leather skirt, a mannish yet sensual three-piece

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/nili-lotan/review/

      

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Erdem Pre-Fall 2019

Erdem Moralioglu loves a strong female character, and in the past has looked to figures including a young Queen Elizabeth II, Adele Astaire, and the artists Sylvia Fein and Hannah Höch for seasonal inspiration. This time around, he trained his eyes on Dame Laura Knight, the first woman artist to be fully elected to The Royal Academy in London.
He looked both to Knight’s impressionistic paintings and to her personal, boyish style in an elegant collection filled with Forties shapes, lush fabrics, nipped waists, bold prints and embroidery.

Erdem Pre-Fall 2019
Courtesy Photo

He shot the collection at The Royal Academy on Piccadilly, conjuring the woman and her art. Pinstripe suits came with elongated jackets, some of which were belted and paired with cropped trousers. Capturing the artist at work, he whipped up a cotton jacquard boiler suit adorned with big, blooming flowers and a bejeweled collar.
Outerwear was also a marriage of masculine and feminine in the form of a tailored frock coat in lipstick pink and a belted cotton trench awash in embroidered white flowers.

Erdem Pre-Fall 2019
Courtesy Photo

There were dresses galore, for day and night — and different moods — including a hand-pleated, flower print gown with ruffled edges and a pink lace one cinched

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/london/erdem/review/

      

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Alejandra Alonso Rojas Pre-Fall 2019

Alejandra Alonso Rojas combined a lot of strategic decisions with her first pre-fall collection. She showed it in her TriBeCa pop-up shop, which is open through the end of December, and approached the collection as a capsule, not in the sense that it was small, but that it focused on establishing what she considers the core of her two-year-old collection — elegant suiting, hand knits, bias-cut eveningwear. She’s limited her seasons to resort, pre-fall and fall, which she sees as the best seasons to delve into knits. She took the opportunity to develop sustainable, all-natural dyes, using indigo, turmeric, blackberries and red cabbage to engineer her own formulas. The results were impressive, ranging from rich to delicate on groups of slipdresses, jackets, skirts and knits. “It was kind of like chemistry,” she said of developing the dyes. “It’s all proven, I swear, with dry-cleaning and everything.”
The collection was a beautiful display of her eye for color, including her signature crimson red and champagne, and soft femininity handled with a modern restraint. Standouts included a color-blocked red and champagne wrap dress, micro-pleated eveningwear and suits done with matching bra tops.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/alejandra-alonso-rojas/review/

      

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Balmain Pre-Fall 2019

“You cannot understand your future until you know your past,” said Olivier Rousteing, who continued to push his allegiance to “aspirational” creations honoring the house’s couture heritage over fickle trends and the world’s ongoing street obsession.
An East-meets-West theme unleashed his predilection for opulent adornment on a China-red dress with textured sequined dragon sleeves and the warrior-inspired embroidered asymmetric tattoo dresses.
Carried over from spring, exaggerated round shapes and pointy pyramid forms played out across the collection, from the sleeves of a jacket in soft black velvet Neoprene to the extreme pointy lapels on evening jackets, revisited on bleached denim versions.
The experiments with structure felt a little heavy-handed at times, like on the sculptural appendages wrapping some of the minis, meant to create the form of a bow when lifted. T-shirts, belts and bags sported the redesigned Balmain logo, a stripped-back monogram combining the letters P and B, the initials of house founder Pierre Balmain, a move that for Rousteing hails a new era for the house.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/paris/balmain/review/

      

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See by Chloé Pre-Fall 2019

In the late Eighties and early Nineties, Amy Arbus took her first street-style photographs in New York. For pre-fall, the Parisian See by Chloé girl channels those streets — “a time when youth culture thrived amidst the city’s diverse social scenes” — clad in a juxtaposition of boyish-prep-meets-fresh-femininity. Cue Prince of Wales carrot pants paired with a lilac, Victorian-inspired ruffled shirt and chunky clogs, or a varsity poncho over a drop-hem day dress and paisley pussy-bow blouse.
Paisley prints and embroidered trims ran their course throughout in faded and dusty blues on flirty matching sets and breezy dresses, while sweaters — from chunky ribbed or slightly distressed dresses to sweater vests and cardigans — kept looks cool. A particularly great paisley sweater, paired with oversized denim shorts, made for a great mash-up, as did the strongest look: a gold brocade button-up shirt, cinched under a wide belt and paired with a paneled gray denim and beige cotton carrot pant. The lineup gave modern interpretation to Arbus characters of yore.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/see-by-chlo/review/

      

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Narciso Rodriguez Fall 2019

Narciso Rodriguez’s decision to shift his show schedule to a June-December cadence is working for him. It works for him personally — he has no intention of sacrificing his August vacation now that he has two young children. And it works for him professionally — even before Rodriguez made the leap, he had scaled down his runway show to extremely intimate (under 50 people) presentations. The same setup during this nascent December fashion week felt aligned with his business model: specific, focused, not for everyone. That’s all before we even get to the clothes, which were spot on.
“That was very emotional,” Rodriguez said immediately following his fall presentation of 20 looks shown via an ultra-private runway at the Standard Highline. “It’s really forging a new moment, for the company and for me as a designer.” Saying goodbye to the rules and regulations that used to dictate his schedule on and off the runway has given him a freedom to explore and express new ideas within the collection. For example, “I would never have thought to open a fall collection with a cotton dress, but it’s a new world,” he said, referring to a loose cotton dress with an Empire waist

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/fall-ready-to-wear-2019/new-york/narciso-rodriguez/review/

      

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Merlette Pre-Fall 2019

Designer Marina Cortbawi has been building out the airy wardrobe of her Merlette customer with 100 percent cotton dresses, skirts and tops over the past few years. Her designs are voluminous but light and have a timeless sensibility. For her latest, Collection 6, Cortbawi focused on building out the wardrobe of her Merlette customer, while consciously designing new layers and silhouettes with a multiple-use, waste-friendly sensibility.
“We are thinking about less waste. I think people are buying less clothes, well they are, statistically…so thinking how versatile is a piece? Our coat is a dress, it’s a coat…it can be paired back to the pant or the dress…short dress, long dress. How many uses does each piece have is always a question we ask with design,” she described of the brand’s first outerwear option: a more-so weighty cotton twill taupe wrapped coatdress with slight balloon sleeves and removable belt — there were even high-waisted trousers to match. There were great pieces throughout: a burgundy balloon-sleeved blouse, a previous season’s tiered dress updated with chenille stripes and even an eyelet lace organza bridal gown.
Cortbawi added that since she’s using the same fabric every season — cotton lawn and poplin, which was improved to

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/merlette/review/

      

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Adeam Pre-Fall 2019

It’s been an exciting start to the week for Adeam’s Hanako Maeda. Michelle Obama just donned a spring 2019 look on Saturday while promoting her new book, and the young designer is introducing her first pre-fall collection after much retailer demand.
Adeam is arguably one of the most exciting young brands to watch, with an aesthetic hallmarked by functionality, Japanese craftsmanship and “kawaii,” which is the culture of quirky and cute in Japan. Maeda has homed in on offering pieces with thoughtful and approachable convertibility, which in turn has eliminated simplicity and basics from the brand’s vocabulary.
Drawing from her archive, she infused pre-fall with a lot of great transitional statement pieces. An oversize blazer featured a peplum that doubled as an obi belt that could also be tied in back; shirting could be worn front-to-back, as could a voluminous plaid dress aired out with cutouts at the sleeves. She balanced experimental silhouettes and wearability with ease, including dresses featuring large built-in sashes and a flirty bandeau dress that could foldover into a high-waisted skirt. To boot, the gingham is water resistant and other fabrics are machine washable and wrinkle-free.
“Women have such diverse lifestyles,” Maeda noted in her showroom, adding: “Even in

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/adeam/review/

      

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Tadashi Shoji Pre-Fall 2019

A dark and moody palette inspired by views of a garden at night proved to be the backbone of Tadashi Shoji’s latest collection. Florals and vines came in abundance — printed, rendered in lace, sequined — on a variety of occasion dresses. Some worked, as in an off-theme, floor-length black gown with built-in capelet in his signature embroidery, which is more often seen in his bridal collection, but welcomed in ready-to-wear, or an off-the-shoulder purple and green embroidered floral gown. Printed jersey knit offerings, from caftans to shorter cocktail dresses, felt less refined. The designer also carried over two ombré offerings from spring, but this time as full-length, ruched and tiered gowns.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/tadashi-shoji/review/

      

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Elie Tahari Pre-Fall 2019

Channeling what pre-fall clothing actually is, pieces for summer dressing, Elie Tahari used the oversaturated hues of Vincent van Gogh’s landscape paintings as a jump-off point. The blue and reds of a van Gogh’s work played out on several pieces, including a mix of prints, in a tightly edited collection.
A designer like Tahari knows his customer — she is decidedly a woman — and the clothing shown speaks to that lady with good dose of suiting, shown in a jacquard print, a suit dress, a few scarf prints dresses with handkerchief hems, and mix of pant shapes meant for power dressing with ease. A structured python jacket was particularly luxe addition to the mix.
Tahari isn’t reinventing the wheel here, but what he does do is add subtle details, like patent black trim on a printed suit jacket, newly developed logo hardware that is subtle to the eye and not brash, exposed darting on a white denim jacket with blue floral print, or mixing textures, like a white silk blouse with cotton sleeves that add some structure to the shoulder. The collection of small details is a push forward that gives his customer newness in pieces that update her already developed

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/elie-tahari/review/

      

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Victor Glemaud Pre-Fall 2019

Victor Glemaud’s pre-fall collection, titled “Notes on Style,” was a jubilant return to color along with innovative takes on knitwear. His last collection was a muted palette of black and white, and though impeccably cut, lacked the vibrancy that has become the brand’s hallmark.
Glemaud drew on his Caribbean roots for color and showed how knitwear, in nuanced variations, is just as reasonable a proposition for warm weather — the first delivery, after all, hits stores beginning in summer. Beach-y knit gowns cut with graphic, sharp lines, along with flirty crop tops and open-weave bodysuits maintained a breathable element apropos for the heat. A rainbow Saga fox fur blanket and mink bucket hat were arguably for chilly beach nights. A thread of ease highlighted the collection’s approachability.
Glemaud also referenced his time growing up and going out in Eighties New York. A vintage tinge could be registered in semi-transparent crochet flared pants, biker shorts shown on guys and gals, and the saturated pinks. He rounded out the range with playful trompe l’oeil, including a great black-and-white dress with the appearance of a low draping slip.
Glemaud thanks Tim Lawrence’s book “Love Saves the Day” for driving him toward a path of exuberant self-expression.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/victor-glemaud/review/

      

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Joseph Pre-Fall 2019

Designed by the in-house team (Joseph’s new creative director Susana Clayton’s first collection won’t appear until spring-summer 2020) pre-fall was packed with the brand’s signature soft separates. This was a big, handsome collection that spanned ready-to-wear, footwear, accessories and outerwear, with most pieces meant for layering.
Rtw was a mix of fluid and tailored, delicate and hefty, with cashmere capes or soft chunky knits paired with printed and pleated silk skirts or fluid dresses with drawstring waists. Tailoring came in the form of a cream tuxedo; structured, wide-legged trousers; military style suits with elongated jackets and patch pockets; and a collarless, double-breasted suit.
As always, Joseph dialed up the outerwear, offering up luscious double-face cashmere coats, reversible sheepskin ones and a dark trench done in a liquid silk satin. Jackets were made from buttery leather, fluffy sheepskin or tailored wool, with off-center buttons.
While there were plenty of neutral tones — including brown, cream and oyster — there were also pops of nature-inspired color in the form of sweaters and pleated skirts in carrot, an oversized cobalt blue turtleneck and dusty pink or lavender knit. Accessories had a utilitarian feel with knee-high Wellington-style boots, cross-body bags with a Seventies feel and totes with thick shoulder straps.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/london/joseph/review/

      

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Versace Pre-Fall 2019

Donatella Versace loves New York. She’ll tell you herself, but now there’s a Versace T-shirt that spells it out, too, combining the Medusa logo and Milton Glaser’s iconic “I Love NY” state logo on a see-now-buy-now souvenir from the house’s first-ever pre-fall show, staged where else but Manhattan.
Years ago Versace held a Versus show in New York, and in 2011 the Versace x H&M show at which Prince performed was also held in town. But she pointed out that Sunday night’s show was the first time there was a real deal Versace show in New York. She said there was symbolism to the date — Dec. 2, Gianni Versace’s birthday — but not the venue — the American Stock Exchange. “It’s not a reference to Capri Holdings,” Versace said during a preview at the company’s Columbus Circle offices a few days before the show, alluding to September’s $2.1 billion acquisition of Versace by Michael Kors Holdings, which resulted in a new name for the parent company — Capri Holdings Ltd.
The show and collection had nothing to do with the deal, but they did have a lot to do with their host city. Versace likes the energy. “There’s freedom here. There’s

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/versace/review/

      

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Givenchy Pre-Fall 2019

“It’s just amazing how dynamic society is today, how global events just rear their heads and it changes the environment that you’re in, even the pace of what we do — everything,” said Clare Waight Keller.
The designer was talking about the genesis of her pre-fall collection for Givenchy, which was inspired by Joseph Cambell’s classic “The Power of Myth,” a book she turned to recently in an effort to make sense of an increasingly chaotic environment. The Greek myth of Icarus, whose hubris led to his demise, felt particularly relevant.
Waight Keller was drawn to its symbolism, in an era when nuclear war — or a Chinese consumer boycott — may be just an ill-judged social media message away. She also liked how it provided a graphic hook for the women’s and men’s looks, in the form of hand-painted prints and bursts of solar yellow and fiery red.
The women’s wardrobe was structured around two key silhouettes: long and lean for the tailored coats with neat shoulders, crisp bolero jackets with finlike arched sleeves, and monochrome evening gowns; boldly oversized for the fake furs, cocoon coats and Eighties-style leather trenches.
Hand-crafted details abounded, from the threaded ruching on the front of a buttery

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/paris/givenchy/review/

      

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Dsquared2 Pre-Fall 2019

“We went back to our roots,” said Dean Caten, referring to the plethora of Canadian references that he and his twin brother Dan injected in their new Dsquared2 collection.
Chunky eco-fur coats, tartan shirts, maxi coats in refreshed Buffalo checks, cozy sweaters with mountaineering motifs and cropped denim pants were the key items of a young, fun wardrobe injected with an “into the wild” attitude. The brand’s cool ladies of the woods also sported asymmetric midiskirts printed with a patchwork of Dsquared2 logos, which were matched with denim jackets layered over soft cardigans, as well as loose denim overalls for an irreverent mannish look.
Expressing the duality deeply rooted in the luxury brand, Dsquared2’s tomboy girls transformed into glamorous sensual women when moving to the urban scenario. Inspired by a Seventies’ New York feel, the Caten brothers translated their sartorial expertise into impeccable suits showing double-breasted jackets and flared pants and into exquisitely tailored Mikado silk high-waisted trousers worn with see-through tops gently wrapping around the bodice and decorating a shoulder with a sculptural ruffle. Engineered bonded leather separates exalted the body’s curves, while more fluid plissé jersey dresses combined elegance and practicality.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/milan/dsquared2/review/

      

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Alexander Wang Collection 2

Alexander Wang summoned the fashion flock to the former Williamsburgh Savings Bank Tower in Brooklyn and dedicated his Collection 2 to the American hustler, referencing Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy and Foxy Brown. “Two women that probably wouldn’t be put side by side, but I felt they had an incredible parallel,” Wang said after the show on Saturday night, explaining both were born in New York to middle-class families and hustled to achieve what they wanted in life — all the while strongly representing the stereotypical uptown/downtown divide. Wang twisted and warped “codes of privilege and wealth, and class and status symbols” to give each exit his cool-girl sensibility. The strongest included tweed jackets with leather butcher’s aprons and chain bracelets worn over rubber gloves; a long, houndstooth topcoat with drone-painted smiley face graffiti by artist Katsu, and evening looks reworked with white T-shirts or men’s blazers cut generously to hang loose like sweatshirts.
Wang also winked to his time at boarding school — the result of his parents’ hustle — into some great preppy moments. There were polos constructed entirely of colored safety pins and styled under slouchy ribbed sweaters with long, leather skirts or oversize rugby shirts with studded crests and pinstriped

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/alexander-wang/review/

      

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Sally LaPointe Pre-Fall 2019

Real or faux? As the great fur debate has moved brands passionately one way or the other, Sally LaPointe has kept her cool. The designer has become synonymous with covetable fur-accented sweaters and, with the launch of e-commerce earlier this year, has certainly seen a demand for mink. But she also introduced faux fur and shearling for resort and has seen interest here from a younger, more conscientious clientele.
She continued to expand that fur language into pre-fall, using fox fur as trimming on cozy-yet-sleek knitwear while utilizing faux fur and shearling in bold, statement outerwear. The brand is founded upon the principle of casual yet cool glam, so a faux-fur duster was grounded with a cut-and-sew wool alpaca set or sequined pants and a turtleneck, topped off by silver o-ring zipper pulls.
The collection’s Nineties tinge was drawn from men’s wear, which influenced soft tailoring done in dusty yellows and blues, sweatsuits made from Lurex and merino wool, and pinstripes fashioned into a standout graphic cashmere and merino wool top and pant. No look better defined the retro men’s influence than knit basketball shorts and a sweater set cut in a yummy papaya hue. Buttery suede separates, elevated silky pajama sets

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/new-york/sally-lapointe/review/

      

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Dior Men’s Pre-Fall 2019

TOKYO — The future of men’s fashion is here.
That was the feeling at Kim Jones’ first pre-fall show for Dior, which was held in a towering circular space inside a steel and glass building on an island of reclaimed land in Tokyo Bay. At the center of the venue was Japanese contemporary artist Hajime Sorayama’s nearly 40-foot-tall metallic sculpture of a sexy female robot figure.
Many of the looks Jones sent around the runway gleamed as brightly as the robot did, with metallic Tyvek jackets, iridescent jacquard suits, polished metal saddle bags, and steel baseball caps by Stephen Jones all vying for attention. A down puffer jacket in metallic blue seemed to trick the eyes, looking different from every angle.
“It’s actually a black garment that gets put into a vacuum and the metal is then sucked through it and sticks to it. So each thing comes out slightly different,” Jones said. “So you get these imperfections, which look beautiful and give more of a sort of personality to the work, and I think that applies nicely to a couture house.”
But as futuristic as some of the pieces were, Jones said his inspiration came mainly from the history of the house. He

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/tokyo/dior-homme-collection/review/

      

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L’Autre Chose Pre-Fall 2019

Nicolò Beretta made his ready-to-wear debut at L’Autre Chose, which he joined in September as creative director, with an easy-to-wear, commercially savvy collection.
The brand’s signature French spirit gave an effortless chic attitude to the lineup, which also celebrated the Parisian lifestyle with a charming print reproducing the view of a typical café in the City of Light.
The collection offered a realistic wardrobe for the dynamic women of today. Teddy bear coats, flared denim pants, crepe sheath dresses and silk frocks printed with elegant and feminine motifs inspired by the influence of the Eastern culture in the Twenties’ Western art, were well-executed, versatile staples. Along with developing more fashionable embroidered dresses and cozy knits, Beretta developed a smart range of blouses, enriched with special ornaments, including plissé inserts.
The founder of footwear label Giannico, Beretta masterfully showed his design skills in the footwear range, including revisited loafers embellished with drapes, boots crafted from a rubberized leather and pumps showing the chunky heels punctuated by a metallic accessory inspired by the antique handles of Parisian front doors.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/2019-pre-fall/milan/lautre-chose/review/

      

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