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Pyjama suits are next big thing as formal wear is hit under Covid

By Priya Elan

Two Japanese firms have created working from home pyjamas to adapt to workers’ needs

First there were smart “use once” tops worn only for virtual work meetings and whipped off thereafter – otherwise known as the “Zoom shirt”. Now, courtesy of two Japanese companies, comes the latest hybrid of the suit and loungewear: the WFH pyjama suit.

Working from home has rubbished the idea of formal dress codes. As sales of suits have suffered (online searches are down 34%) and consumers pivot to Crocs and tracksuit bottoms (searches for “sweatpants” are up by 108%, according to digitaloft.co.uk), workers and companies have tried to adapt to our changing work/life balance with awkward results.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/28/pyjama-suits-are-next-big-thing-as-formal-wear-is-hit-under-covid

      

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Forget grooming to Zoom – 18th-century men were first to make up

By Priya Elan

As sales of cosmetics for men soar, book reveals industry’s first boom was in 1700s

Male cosmetics are no longer the preserve of rock stars, with data showing sales are booming. But a new book by a historian at the University of Exeter reveals that far from being a modern trend, grooming products for men were popular centuries before being advocated by the likes of Russell Brand, David Bowie and Prince.

Dr Alun Withey says it all started in the 1750s. “The 18th century is actually the beginning of the market for men’s cosmetics that we see today,” he says, noting there was a “new focus on refining the body, so personal grooming becomes important”.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/28/forget-grooming-to-zoom-18th-century-men-were-first-to-make-up

      

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Red nail varnish: 10 of the best

By Funmi Fetto

Painting your nails is quick, easy and there’s a shade of high-shine red to suit all hands

I miss getting my nails done. Especially in reds – pillar box red, pinky red, raspberry red, orangey red… regardless of skin tone, you can always find a red. That I yearn for a professional manicure surprises me. Back when nail salons were open, I could think of a million other things I’d rather be doing. But I liked the end results, so I went. And until nail salons reopen, there’s nail polish. If, like me, you’re terrible at doing your own nails, with a little patience there’s no reason you can’t get great results at home. These are all streak free, easy to use and have high-shine finishes. Where Christian Louboutin falls down in practicality, it makes up for in its sublime gel-like glossiness. For a long-lasting gel finish, try Emolyne (no UV lamp required). It might not compare to the longevity of a professional manicure, but the joy you’ll feel each time you glimpse your hands? That lasts ages.

1. Emolyne Metamorphosis Gel Lacquer £11, emolyne.com
2. L’Atelier Green Nail Polish £10.85, lateliergreen.com
3. Nailberry Polish £15, nailberry.co.uk
4. Dolce & Gabbana The Nail Lacquer £22, harrods.com
5. Essie Nail Colour £7.99, boots.com
6. Givenchy Nail Polish £19.50, debenhams.com
7. Nails Inc Vegan Nail Polish £9, nailsinc.com
8. Dior Red Smile £22, dior.com
9. Christian Louboutin Beauty Nail Colour £39.50, cultbeauty.co.uk
10. Chanel Le Vernis Long Wear Nail Colour £22, chanel.com

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2021/feb/28/red-nail-varnish-10-of-the-best

      

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Wearing PPE all day? Try these cleansers | Sali Hughes

By Sali Hughes

For frontline NHS workers who are getting chafing or sores caused by PPE, help is at hand

My charity Beauty Banks has spent much of this past year redistributing skincare products to frontline NHS workers, and everyone we’ve talked to has told us that PPE is painful. The heavy kit, which high-dependency unit, cardiac and Covid team workers (nurses, porters, doctors, cleaners and more) must keep tightly on for hours at a time, really, really hurts. At best, those huge visors chafe, leaving skin red, sore and itchy. At worst – and frequently – they cause pressure sores on the nose, jaw and temples that can break, bleed and weep. One Covid team leader said he winces every time he reaches for his face gear after a loo break.

If you or your loved ones work in PPE, one possible answer – if not the magic bullet – lies in protecting the compromised skin barrier and keeping it clean and balanced. Ceramides – the fatty glues holding skin together – help protect it from environmental stresses, which is why I’d suggest moisturising twice daily with the very gentle Facial Moisturising Lotion (£13, 52ml), from CeraVe, an entire brand centred on them. Soothing niacinamide, too, is ideal, since it helps to strengthen the barrier and repair damage. Try layering Superdrug’s Me+ Niacinamide & Zinc Booster (£5.99, 30ml) under the moisturiser, immediately after cleansing.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/27/sali-hughes-wearing-ppe-all-day-try-these

      

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Nine years after Trayvon Martin’s killing, hoodies still spark debate

By Priya Elan

Garment became associated with racist stereotype, prompting some to embrace the hoodie as a statement of ‘racial pride and defiance’

On the ninth anniversary of Trayvon Martin’s death, the racial conversations in America around the hoodie continue.

The garment has been long associated with a racist stereotype of criminality in Black communities and a device for racial profiling in the United States. Martin was wearing one on 26 February 2012 when he was shot dead by a neighborhood watchman in Florida while out buying a pack of Skittles.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/27/trayvon-martin-hoodies-black-young-people

      

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Your new two-piece? A pair of retro classy pyjamas | Priya Elan

By Priya Elan

Been fretting that you shouldn’t keep wearing the clothes you slept in? Don’t worry: loungewear has been going up in the world

Sometime last spring, time stopped. We were hamstrung by the disappearance of our routines, and the ones we developed in their place felt a bit as if we were acting in a play called Life. Unfortunately, dressing in any sort of traditionally respectable way was one of the things that fell by the wayside.

There were no longer office clothes or going-out clothes; now, there were just survival clothes. They looked strangely familiar – like the clothes you wore on a Sunday when you wondered whether you could be bothered to leave the house to buy some eggs. They looked like the indistinct items you threw on to take out the bins, when you hoped the darkness of night would hide you from the eyes of your neighbours.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/26/priya-elan-your-new-two-piece-a-pair-of-retro-classy-pyjamas

      

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‘It’s a basic human right’: the fight for adaptive fashion

By Lottie Jackson

While brands big and small are exploring disability-friendly clothing, it remains a niche market that struggles to reach consumers

From constrictive corsetry to blistering 6in heels, the oft-quoted line: “You have to suffer for fashion,” has afflicted humanity for centuries (however much it seems alien to our current wardrobe of Zoom-friendly sweatpants). But what happens when even a simple garment is disabling? Or when suffering for fashion is not a stylistic choice, but an everyday reality that can affect someone’s quality of life?

For many disabled people, off-the-peg clothes are inaccessible and cause discomfort, from fiddly buttons to seams that chafe in a wheelchair. “Clothing plays an important part in living well,” says Monika Dugar, the designer of Reset, an adaptivewear brand that launched at a virtual event during London fashion week. “Due to restricted mobility, clothing choices can impact whether people with disabilities can operate functionally.”

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/26/its-a-basic-human-right-the-fight-for-adaptive-fashion

      

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Without the front row drama, London fashion week was missing something vital | Jess Cartner-Morley

By Jess Cartner-Morley

There’s plenty to admire in the digital version, but watching dresses on a laptop screen is no match for crowds and chaos

I have spent the past few days at London fashion week, while really missing London fashion week. Watching dresses glide past on my laptop screen, wishing I was squished on to a hard concrete bench up close and personal with the real thing. Pining for salacious front row gossip, for haughty models switching their skirts like crocodile tails, for tantrums and tiaras and fashion week in all its mayhem and madness.

The first ever all-digital London fashion week has had gorgeous clothes – and even glorious shows. Simone Rocha took her Bridgerton-adjacent leather bodices and punk ballgowns in crunchy tulle to St John’s Church in Paddington, London, and filmed them on eight models over the course of a day, to accommodate scrupulous Covid-safe protocol. (Look closely and you can see how the light through the stained-glass windows changes from morning to afternoon.) Joely Richardson, her mother, Vanessa Redgrave, and her daughter, Daisy Bevan, were filmed on an iPhone reciting Shakespeare while wearing Roksanda Ilincic’s new collection at their Surrey home. Emilia Wickstead built a set in lush, forced rhubarb pink for her Hitchcock-chic models to walk through; Molly Goddard painted a sunny yellow backdrop in her Bethnal Green studio.

But none of these shows had an audience. And without the front row, in all its absurd but compelling pomp and pageantry, shows lack theatre. Without the rumours and secrets and off-stage feuds, the plot loses momentum. The influencers and celebrities overdressed to the nines at 9am, the ridiculous miniature canapés, the drama, the ego, the impractical shoes: these are jokes essential to the story. They are also the very things that help make fashion week brilliant.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/feb/26/london-fashion-week-front-row-drama-digital

      

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From hands-free shoes to TikTok neighbour-shaming: this week’s fashion trends

By Guardian Staff

What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this week

The dark ages If medieval “wine windows” were the mood of 2020, then Celine’s chainmail collars and teen knights are 2021’s response.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/26/from-hands-free-shoes-to-tiktok-neighbour-shaming-this-weeks-fashion-trends

      

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Old-fashioned glamour meets psychedelic print as Prada shines in Milan

By Jess Cartner-Morley

Nowhere does beautifully strange quite as well as Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons in their womenswear collaboration

A Prada catwalk show is not supposed to be easy on the eye, and the latest womenswear collection broadcast from Milan’s digital fashion week was no exception. Wearing psychedelic-print bodysuits and with their hair oiled into sideburns, models marched through interlocking windowless rooms where Muppet faux fur sprouted in place of wallpaper. As an entertainment experience, it was less like sitting front row at an upmarket catwalk show, and more like putting on a headset for a virtual reality game with an elegantly but eccentrically dressed avatar.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/25/old-fashioned-glamour-meets-psychedelic-print-as-prada-shines-at-milans-fashion-week

      

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Chinese Australian fashion influencer Margaret Zhang appointed editor-in-chief of Vogue China

By Elias Visontay

Experts say the 27-year-old can help ‘keep the good ties rolling’ between the two countries at a time of ‘political skirmishes’

A 27-year-old Chinese Australian fashion influencer has been appointed editor-in-chief of Vogue China in a move experts believe could serve as positive soft diplomacy at a time of increasing tension between Canberra and Beijing.

Margaret Zhang, who was born in Sydney and grew up in the suburb of West Ryde, is Vogue’s youngest editor-in-chief – despite having never edited a magazine.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/media/2021/feb/25/chinese-australian-fashioner-influencer-margaret-zhang-appointed-editor-in-chief-of-vogue-china

      

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Cardi B: 'I have felt prejudice' over racial disparities in the fashion industry

By Priya Elan

The rapper, who has also designed and modeled, says black artists are discriminated against despite being powerful influences

Cardi B has hit out at the racial disparities in the fashion world in a new interview, saying that black artists are discriminated against despite being powerful influences in the industry.

Speaking to Interview magazine, the rapper has decried the way rap artists are treated in comparison to their white musical peers.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/24/cardi-b-i-have-felt-prejudice-racial-disparities-fashion-industry

      

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London Fashion Week autumn/winter 2021: key shows – in pictures

By Jo Jones, Helen Seamons and Peter Bevan

The first digital-only London Fashion Week saw big names and new talent showcase their collections online. From Royal Ballet dancers to pineapple leather and an Oscar-winning actress, here are the highlights

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/gallery/2021/feb/24/london-fashion-week-autumnwinter-2021-key-shows-in-pictures

      

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Fendi serves palette cleanser for label's optimistic outlook

By Priya Elan

Creative director, Kim Jones, oversees energetic Milan catwalk and says people are desperate to dress up

There is a sense of mild panic on the opening day of Milan fashion week. Despite some big hitters showing (Dolce & Gabbana, Prada and Valentino), with three A-list fashion labels absent from the calendar (Gucci, Bottega Veneta and Versace), it is hard not to link this shrunken lineup with the impact of the the coronavirus pandemic on the industry.

It has been nearly a year since Giorgio Armani had to cancel invites to his show and presented his collection behind closed doors because of the virus. Business has continued to decline – according to estimates by the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana (CNMI), which organises Milan fashion week, total turnover at Italian fashion companies has declined by 25%.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/24/fendi-serves-palette-cleanser-optimistic-outlook-milan

      

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Feed your moths and hide your trousers: the expert guide to making clothes last forever

By Hannah Marriott

Orsola de Castro is a fashion designer who became a re-use revolutionary. Now she has written a book to help people care for their clothes – and the planet

There is a rip in the armpit of Orsola de Castro’s jumper. She raises her hand high in the air so I can see it: a slash of pale skin peeks from tomato-red wool. This “memory hole”, as De Castro describes it, tells the story of the jumper’s long life. It was owned by her cousin, then her daughter. “It is very old Benetton, from when Benetton was still made in Italy. You can’t see it on Zoom, but this is really nice wool,” she says, arm still aloft.

De Castro, 54, is an activist, a lecturer, a former designer and a co-founder of not-for-profit movement Fashion Revolution. With the release of her book Loved Clothes Last, she has also become a kind of anti-Marie Kondo. She advocates “radical keeping”, not decluttering. “The only antidote to throwaway culture is to keep. So I am an obsessive keeper,” she says.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/24/feed-your-moths-and-hide-your-trousers-the-expert-guide-to-making-clothes-last-for-ever

      

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Digital fashion designers sought for UK’s first degree in virtual couture

By Hannah Marriott Fashion editor

Environmental concerns and tech boom have conjured ‘perfect storm’ for master’s course in fashion and gaming, says professor

The seemingly sci-fi world of digital couture – in which social media users can buy virtual clothing to be worn online, while gamers can dress avatars in flamboyant “skins” – is increasingly being hailed as the next big thing in the industry.

Now, virtual clothes designers can take a master’s on the subject, the first of its kind in the UK, at the University for the Creative Arts in Farnham.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/23/digital-fashion-designers-uk-degree-digital-couture-gaming-tech

      

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Burberry's Riccardo Tisci taps into the fluid generation

By Jess Cartner-Morley

Collection inspired by the ‘great outdoors’ featured silk skirts and women but was entirely menswear

There were elegant pleated silk skirts and several of the models were women, but Burberry’s latest catwalk show – filmed in the brand’s empty and shuttered London flagship store and live-streamed as part of a digital-only London fashion week – was an entirely menswear collection.

In a Zoom call after the show, the designer Riccardo Tisci shrugged off any apparent contradiction as representing an outdated way of thinking about clothes. “Fluidity is a really important word to the younger generation,” he said. “They aren’t frightened of it, because they aren’t scared of their sexuality.”

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2021/feb/22/burberrys-riccardo-tisci-taps-into-the-fluid-generation

      

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