Day: November 12, 2020

Check her out: how Netflix hit The Queen’s Gambit thrills with fashion

By Morwenna Ferrier

Stylish chess drama fills the hole left by period pieces such as Mad Men – and puts the clothes front and centre

In chess, the first move is everything. This is also true in TV – something The Queen’s Gambit, a seductive seven-part drama about a female chess prodigy in the American midwest, knows all too well.

In the first few moments, we meet our teenage hero, Beth Harman (Anya Taylor-Joy), asleep in a hotel bath wearing a burgundy Pierre Cardin shift dress from the night before. Moments later, she has changed into a Biba-inspired mint-green viscose one, which matches the tranquillisers she knocks back with a minibar vodka. Grabbing her shoes – black pointed flats, so this must be the 60s – she hurries downstairs to play the most important chess game of her career on the mother of all hangovers.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2020/nov/12/check-her-out-how-netflix-hit-the-queens-gambit-thrills-with-fashion

      

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Destination wonder: a journey through Ghana’s feelgood fashion world

By Chidozie Obasi

With Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Accra’s fashion week cancelled due to coronavirus, photographer Carlos Idun-Tawiah captures the talent of the new wave of designers who would have been showcasing their work

Against the backdrop of West Africa’s heritage, Ghana’s fashion scene is culturally rich and diverse. Nestling between Togo and Ivory Coast, it oozes with vital energy. It was once home to the celebrated Yaa Asantewaa, queen mother of the Edweso tribe of the Asante (Ashanti). As Ghana’s history continues to unfold, its precolonial past has woven its essence into the work of its modern artists. Today’s generation of designers explores the depths of the nation’s heritage, without trivialising its value. Through experimentation and by devoting their tradition to the streets of Accra, young designers are bringing Ghana’s colourful culture into sharp focus.

With Accra fashion week postponed due to Covid-19, Mercedes-Benz has worked with five next-gen designers and the photographer Carlos Idun-Tawia to showcase Ghana’s emerging talent and the country’s tradition of sharing skills from one generation to the next through storytelling.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/nov/12/destination-wonder-a-journey-through-ghanas-feelgood-fashion-world

      

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Rainbow bright! How the symbol of optimism and joy spread across our clothes, homes and lives in 2020

By Jess Cartner-Morley

Appearing in windows and bookshelves, the rainbow became the defining motif of the year. Now, they are everywhere from trainers to Christmas decorations – and are big business. What’s behind this new optimism economy?

The rainbows started appearing all over Italy within a few days of schools closing for the first lockdown, back in March. Crayon drawings were taped to the inside of windows; poster-painted banners hung from balconies. When the pandemic came to Britain the rainbows came too, with the Italian message of positivity andrà tutto bene (everything will be all right) morphing into thanks to the NHS. Then, during the months of lockdown, the rainbows moved inside our homes, with a craze for arranging books by colour in pursuit of an aesthetically pleasing Zoom backdrop.

The rainbow is to 2020 what “keep calm and carry on” was to 1939. And, just as “keep calm and carry on” began as a public information campaign but became a tea towel industry, what began as a gesture of hope is now big business. John Lewis reports that an £8 rainbow bauble is an early festive bestseller. (After a decade of tasteful soft-white fairy lights, I predict a comeback this year for multicoloured Christmas tree lights – rebranded, no doubt, as “rainbow lights”.) Shiver ’n’ Shake Rainbow Kate, a gaudy-haired £40 doll with a thermometer for reading her temperature when she shakes with “fever”, is tipped as one of the toys of the season. Meanwhile, tracksuit aficionados are sitting out the second lockdown in Olivia Rubin’s £150 pastel-toned rainbow stripe tracksuits.

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Via:: https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2020/nov/12/rainbow-bright-how-the-symbol-of-optimism-and-joy-spread-across-our-clothes-homes-and-lives-in-2020

      

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