Destination XL’s London Store Closure Takes Bite Out of Business

It was a tough third quarter for Destination XL Group. On Friday, the largest men’s big and tall specialty retailer reported net losses for the period rose to $7.2 million from a net loss of $2 million in the prior year’s quarter. The company attributed the higher loss in large part to the closure of […]

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Bikkembergs Sets Relaunch From China

MILAN — One company, one brand, one name. Formerly known as Dirk Bikkembergs, the fashion house, with a strong focus on urban sportswear, was recently renamed Bikkembergs and consequently its offering was streamlined to include only one brand, designed by creative director Lee Wood. Driven by a “make it simple” mentality, said Bikkembergs chief operating […]

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Southern Tide to Open First Company-Owned Store

Allen Stephenson was a senior in college in 2006 when he came up with the idea of creating a colorful polo shirt with a skipjack fish as its logo. The Greenville, S.C., native started to make inroads in the South before hitting the trade show circuit in New York — with his mother by his […]

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The Lowdown on Great Auk Outfitters, Ministry of Supply’s New Ethical Luxury Brand

Today, the Boston-based technical apparel brand Ministry of Supply launches “Great Auk Outfitters,” in the name of engineering a more ethical, environmentally responsible luxury brand. While vegan winter jacket alternatives exist from the likes of Matt & Nat, Nanushka and Ganni, Great Auk Outfitters positions itself against Canada Goose and Moncler in terms of performance. […]

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John Bercow Says David Cameron ‘Thinks People Like Him Are Born To Rule’

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Kate Middleton Completes Her Somber Look With This $30 Sparkly Accessory at Festival of Remembrance

Kate Middleton went for an appropriately somber look as she and the rest of the British royals honored fallen soldiers today at the Festival of Remembrance in Kensington, London. Middleton sported a navy, long-sleeved dress with sheer black tights. Kate Middleton and Prince William arrive to the Festival of Remembrance in London on Nov. 9. […]

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UK Weather Forecast: Flood Warnings Remain In Place As First Snow Of The Season Is Recorded

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Meghan Markle Wears Chic Bow-Accented Pumps at Festival of Remembrance

Meghan Markle recycled shoes from the depths of her closet at the Royal Festival of Remembrance today at London’s Royal Albert Hall. The Duchess of Sussex went for a vintage feel with her attire, selecting an understated black dress with a subtle jacquard pattern. The dress featured a V-neckline and a full skirt. Meghan Markle […]

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Melania Trump Jets Off to Alabama in Her Favorite 4-Inch Stilettos

Melania Trump jetted from Washington, D.C. to Alabama today alongside husband Donald Trump — and she looked sleek in head-to-heel black. The first lady wore a knee-length coat with a ribbed collar and a button-up front, which she layered over a long-sleeved dress. Melania Trump in a black coat and Manolo Blahnik BB pumps en […]

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Labour Candidate’s Daughter Bridges Political Divide With ‘Pockets For Women’ Manifesto

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A$AP Rocky To Return To Perform In Sweden Months After Detainment

The rapper is scheduled to perform in Stockholm in December. Via:: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/asap-rocky-return-sweden-performance_n_5dc6f009e4b02bf57940c587       

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Jaime King Wears Tory Burch Loafers Inspired by the Designer’s Dad to Ray-Ban Event in LA

Jaime King showed up in style to the opening of Ray-Ban’s latest outpost on Los Angeles’ Abbot Kinney Boulevard last week. The 40-year-old “Pearl Harbor” actress wore a striped, zip-front shirt from Tory Burch (marked down to $209 on the brand’s site) tucked into wide-legged denim pants. Jaime King wears Tory Burch flats at Ray-Ban’s […]

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Best Cyber Monday Shoe Deals You Can Expect

With Halloween in the books, our collective attention has shifted to the holidays — and to the savings that come along with the season. Cyber Monday represents one of the biggest sales opportunities of the years — and the shoe deals are no joke. Here, FN rounds up everything we know so far about the […]

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Paulina Porzikova Responds To Reports That Ric Ocasek Cut Her Out Of His Will

The supermodel and widow of the late Cars frontman says she had known for months. Via:: https://www.huffpost.com/entry/paulina-porzikova-knew-ric-ocasek-cut-her-out-of-will_n_5dc6f434e4b00927b233f84f       

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Donald Trump Endorsed A ‘Maga Challenge’ And The Results Are Erm… Interesting

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How A Conspiracy Theory About The Notre Dame Cathedral Led To A Mosque Shooting

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How A Conspiracy Theory About The Notre Dame Cathedral Led To A Mosque Shooting

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Alexandra Shulman: ‘I value contentment rather than focusing on being happy’

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Top Posts-Editor’s selected Article

IN THE HOOD: The hoodie is as much a clothing staple as it is a divisive cultural symbol and streetwear icon favored by youth subcultures and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs alike. Now, it's getting its own exhibition at the Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam, which opens on Dec. 1. The Hoodie, which runs until April 2020, traces the garment's history, starting with its role in 1930s workwear. A selection of designers including Rick Owens, Off-White and Vetements will have hoodies on display complimented with an installation created by Bogomir Doringer and works by photographer Campbell Addy. Depending on who's wearing it, the hoodie can be an indicator of profession, personality and values. More so than any other garment – except, maybe, jeans – the hoodie sits at the intersection of gender, ethnicity, age, and geography. Sometimes, it can even be a provocation. “Today, we don't associate black leather jackets with the outsider, they've been normalized, evoking a specific class and market. Hoodies, however, are touted as a trend – while also being demonized,” said Lou Stoppard, curator of the exhibition. The exhibition aims to challenge viewers on who wears the hoodie, and what it represents. Digital footage, social media posts, and the garment itself are usedFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
IN THE HOOD: The hoodie is as much a clothing staple as it is a divisive cultural symbol and streetwear icon favored by youth subcultures and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs alike. Now, it's getting its own exhibition at the Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam, which opens on Dec. 1. The Hoodie, which runs until April 2020, traces the garment's history, starting with its role in 1930s workwear. A selection of designers including Rick Owens, Off-White and Vetements will have hoodies on display complimented with an installation created by Bogomir Doringer and works by photographer Campbell Addy. Depending on who's wearing it, the hoodie can be an indicator of profession, personality and values. More so than any other garment – except, maybe, jeans – the hoodie sits at the intersection of gender, ethnicity, age, and geography. Sometimes, it can even be a provocation. “Today, we don't associate black leather jackets with the outsider, they've been normalized, evoking a specific class and market. Hoodies, however, are touted as a trend – while also being demonized,” said Lou Stoppard, curator of the exhibition. The exhibition aims to challenge viewers on who wears the hoodie, and what it represents. Digital footage, social media posts, and the garment itself are usedFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — “I love the idea that my thrifted worker's pants may have previously belonged to someone named Gerard.” This sentence was uttered by Emilie, one of the seven young fashion aficionados interviewed in “Radical Fashion Kids,” a 15-minute documentary produced by the Institut Français de la Mode, which was unveiled on Wednesday during the Fashion Reboot conference, a day of talks dealing with the fashion industry's current challenges. “Radical Fashion Kids” featured a range of Gen Zers, from 13-year-old Ondine, who stopped buying fast fashion after watching the documentary “The True Cost” to 19-year-old Peter, who doesn't see the point of brick-and-mortar stores as he can scroll through resale platforms on his phone in bed. Their interviews drove home a key point: The secondhand market is stronger than ever. According to IFM teacher Thomas Delattre, 40 percent of French consumers bought at least one secondhand item in 2019, up from 30 percent in 2018 and 15 percent in 2009. “This is true across all socio-professional categories and touches both men and woman equally,” he told the audience during a presentation named “Re-consuming: New Needs, New Strategies,” based on a study of French consumers led by the IFM. The point of the video wasFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — “I love the idea that my thrifted worker's pants may have previously belonged to someone named Gerard.” This sentence was uttered by Emilie, one of the seven young fashion aficionados interviewed in “Radical Fashion Kids,” a 15-minute documentary produced by the Institut Français de la Mode, which was unveiled on Wednesday during the Fashion Reboot conference, a day of talks dealing with the fashion industry's current challenges. “Radical Fashion Kids” featured a range of Gen Zers, from 13-year-old Ondine, who stopped buying fast fashion after watching the documentary “The True Cost” to 19-year-old Peter, who doesn't see the point of brick-and-mortar stores as he can scroll through resale platforms on his phone in bed. Their interviews drove home a key point: The secondhand market is stronger than ever. According to IFM teacher Thomas Delattre, 40 percent of French consumers bought at least one secondhand item in 2019, up from 30 percent in 2018 and 15 percent in 2009. “This is true across all socio-professional categories and touches both men and woman equally,” he told the audience during a presentation named “Re-consuming: New Needs, New Strategies,” based on a study of French consumers led by the IFM. The point of the video wasFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
LONDON — London fashion incubator the Trampery has made the environment a top priority with the official launch of its Sustainable Fashion Accelerator program, which is meant to help young labels integrate sustainability into their business models. Supported by the mayor of London's Good Growth Fund and Hackney Wick's Creative Enterprise Zone, the Trampery chose Steven Tai Studio, Sabinna, We Are Rewritten, Lara Intimates, Leticia Credidio, Sarah Baily and Been London to be part of the first cohort of labels to test the six-month program. “So far, it's been great. The community aspect and support system is key here,” said designer Sabinna Rachimova of Sabinna. “As a founder you feel so lonely sometimes, especially when you scale and grow. There's always some new challenge that pops up and the Sustainable Fashion Accelerator actually answered a lot of questions I had.” She was speaking at the launch event on Tuesday at one of the Trampery's buildings in Fish Island Village — in the outer reaches of East London. Members of the industry toasted to the success of the new program. “The program gave us the confidence to start approaching the business in a holistic manner. The seminars breeds a mind-set with sustainability in the forefront of everythingFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
LONDON — London fashion incubator the Trampery has made the environment a top priority with the official launch of its Sustainable Fashion Accelerator program, which is meant to help young labels integrate sustainability into their business models. Supported by the mayor of London's Good Growth Fund and Hackney Wick's Creative Enterprise Zone, the Trampery chose Steven Tai Studio, Sabinna, We Are Rewritten, Lara Intimates, Leticia Credidio, Sarah Baily and Been London to be part of the first cohort of labels to test the six-month program. “So far, it's been great. The community aspect and support system is key here,” said designer Sabinna Rachimova of Sabinna. “As a founder you feel so lonely sometimes, especially when you scale and grow. There's always some new challenge that pops up and the Sustainable Fashion Accelerator actually answered a lot of questions I had.” She was speaking at the launch event on Tuesday at one of the Trampery's buildings in Fish Island Village — in the outer reaches of East London. Members of the industry toasted to the success of the new program. “The program gave us the confidence to start approaching the business in a holistic manner. The seminars breeds a mind-set with sustainability in the forefront of everythingFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
MILAN — There's a changing of the guard at Marni. The Italian brand's chief executive officer Stefano Biondo is exiting the company and its parent group OTB. He will be succeeded by Barbara Calò, who will be holding the title of general manager. Calò joined Marni at the beginning of 2016 as global omnichannel director, and in her new position she will report to OTB ceo Ubaldo Minelli. Biondo arrived at Marni in May 2018 and was part of the new organization of the brand's management structure globally, reporting to Minelli. Biondo was previously chief brand officer at Italian eyewear company Safilo. Marni's revenues top 170 million euros, 60 percent of which are generated through the 76 directly operated stores and its online shop. Handbags and footwear are growing categories and represent more than 55 percent of total revenues. Upon Biondo's arrival, the company said it would focus on Asia, especially China, a further development of its men's collections, and licensing partnerships. In September 2018, Marni teamed with Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck to celebrate the opening of its store in New York's Upper East Side neighborhood. Relocating from a different space on the same street, the 2,228-square-foot, two-story Madison Avenue boutique carries a wide offering of the Milanese brand's women'sFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
MILAN — There's a changing of the guard at Marni. The Italian brand's chief executive officer Stefano Biondo is exiting the company and its parent group OTB. He will be succeeded by Barbara Calò, who will be holding the title of general manager. Calò joined Marni at the beginning of 2016 as global omnichannel director, and in her new position she will report to OTB ceo Ubaldo Minelli. Biondo arrived at Marni in May 2018 and was part of the new organization of the brand's management structure globally, reporting to Minelli. Biondo was previously chief brand officer at Italian eyewear company Safilo. Marni's revenues top 170 million euros, 60 percent of which are generated through the 76 directly operated stores and its online shop. Handbags and footwear are growing categories and represent more than 55 percent of total revenues. Upon Biondo's arrival, the company said it would focus on Asia, especially China, a further development of its men's collections, and licensing partnerships. In September 2018, Marni teamed with Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck to celebrate the opening of its store in New York's Upper East Side neighborhood. Relocating from a different space on the same street, the 2,228-square-foot, two-story Madison Avenue boutique carries a wide offering of the Milanese brand's women'sFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — French women are taking over the business world. Lisa Chavy, founder of lingerie brand Livy, is the latest French entrepreneur to have captured the attention of an international audience, following the footsteps of Sézane's Morgane Sézalory and Caudalie's Mathilde Thomas. “France is trending right now,” mused the lingerie designer over patisseries at a Parisian hotel, dispelling the myth of the French girl's tiny appetite. “It seems like as soon as a French woman steps up and does something different, people get on board,” she continued. “The weird thing is, you don't really see that in fashion. Look at LVMH: not one of its fashion houses is helmed by a French woman.” After 12 years designing for Millennial-friendly underwear brand Undiz, Chavy, who is 38, decided in 2017 to launch her own brand to fill a gap she had identified within the French market. “The French scene is currently filled with mid-market, affordable luxury ready-to-wear brands, such as the SMCP labels (Sandro, Maje and Claudie Pierlot), who cater the 30-year-old woman with a bit of spending power,” Chavy said. “But where does this woman go to buy her lingerie? We saw this as the perfect opportunity to bring the luxury experience to an affordableFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — French women are taking over the business world. Lisa Chavy, founder of lingerie brand Livy, is the latest French entrepreneur to have captured the attention of an international audience, following the footsteps of Sézane's Morgane Sézalory and Caudalie's Mathilde Thomas. “France is trending right now,” mused the lingerie designer over patisseries at a Parisian hotel, dispelling the myth of the French girl's tiny appetite. “It seems like as soon as a French woman steps up and does something different, people get on board,” she continued. “The weird thing is, you don't really see that in fashion. Look at LVMH: not one of its fashion houses is helmed by a French woman.” After 12 years designing for Millennial-friendly underwear brand Undiz, Chavy, who is 38, decided in 2017 to launch her own brand to fill a gap she had identified within the French market. “The French scene is currently filled with mid-market, affordable luxury ready-to-wear brands, such as the SMCP labels (Sandro, Maje and Claudie Pierlot), who cater the 30-year-old woman with a bit of spending power,” Chavy said. “But where does this woman go to buy her lingerie? We saw this as the perfect opportunity to bring the luxury experience to an affordableFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — Forget resale. The latest tech-driven start-up allows fashion fans the possibility to revive items from past collections. Volvita, which will let people peruse a library of fashion brands' previous and current collections, curate sharable playlists of favorite pieces and preorder garments that might be remade, is the brainchild of cofounders Christina Grammenos and Christian Drappi. The concept has a sustainable angle since producing an exact number of preordered garments leads to no overstock — overproduction being one of fashion's dirtiest secrets. Grammenos, Volvita's chief executive officer, was previously general manager of influencer marketing platform Tribe Dynamics, received an MBA from Harvard Business School and was a business planner at Miramax. Drappi was a software engineer at Tribe Dynamics and is now Volvita's chief technical officer. Jad Boutros, cofounder and ceo of TerraTrue and former chief security officer of Snap Inc.; Veronika Kapustina, practitioner in residence at the London School of Economics' Marshall Institute; Nicole Shanahan, founder and ceo of ClearAccesIP, and AbdulAziz AlRashed invested in the recent funding round. Christian Drappi Courtesy Photo Monies will be used to help Volvita, a mobile application, launch a pilot with a few undisclosed brands in January. The app is meant to broaden consumers' fashion choices and tap into their wishFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — Forget resale. The latest tech-driven start-up allows fashion fans the possibility to revive items from past collections. Volvita, which will let people peruse a library of fashion brands' previous and current collections, curate sharable playlists of favorite pieces and preorder garments that might be remade, is the brainchild of cofounders Christina Grammenos and Christian Drappi. The concept has a sustainable angle since producing an exact number of preordered garments leads to no overstock — overproduction being one of fashion's dirtiest secrets. Grammenos, Volvita's chief executive officer, was previously general manager of influencer marketing platform Tribe Dynamics, received an MBA from Harvard Business School and was a business planner at Miramax. Drappi was a software engineer at Tribe Dynamics and is now Volvita's chief technical officer. Jad Boutros, cofounder and ceo of TerraTrue and former chief security officer of Snap Inc.; Veronika Kapustina, practitioner in residence at the London School of Economics' Marshall Institute; Nicole Shanahan, founder and ceo of ClearAccesIP, and AbdulAziz AlRashed invested in the recent funding round. Christian Drappi Courtesy Photo Monies will be used to help Volvita, a mobile application, launch a pilot with a few undisclosed brands in January. The app is meant to broaden consumers' fashion choices and tap into their wishFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
For spring, contemporary designers went for big and bold, offering up exaggerated sleeves and poufed silhouettes with a playful demeanor. Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
For spring, contemporary designers went for big and bold, offering up exaggerated sleeves and poufed silhouettes with a playful demeanor. Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
Martin Margiela is back and talking. Thirty years after he first mystified and enthralled fashion with his nonconformist brilliance, and 11 years after he walked away from the industry following his 20th anniversary runway show, the designer is the subject of Reiner Holzemer's documentary film “Martin Margiela: In His Own Words,” which premieres tonight at the DOC NYC Film Festival. The director's previous works include films on William Eggleston, Juergen Teller and, most recently, the 2017 “Dries” (as in Van Noten). Margiela is widely considered one of modern fashion's most important designers, his influence continuing today in all sorts of arenas — deconstruction, streetwear, repurposed vintage, down-off-the-pedestal haute couture, alternative show venues. Anyone with a casual interest in the edgier aspects of fashion's recent past should find plenty of interest in the documentary; serious fashion-history obsessives will be all aflutter to hear firsthand the designer's perspective on his career. Margiela's conversation volleys between esoteric musings and pragmatic dissection of craft and problem-solving; from the start, he distinguished himself as both renegade creator and skilled artisan. He was also a designer who for two decades navigated the uneasy terrain of a challenging industry, and he offers a brief, stinging assessment of whyFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
Plus-size lingerie, skimpy swimsuits and other unmentionables were the buzzwords of choice at the HUG Gala Wednesday evening in Midtown Manhattan. The annual Project Help Us Give Gala — now in its 64th year — was formed by leaders in the lingerie and swimwear industries to raise money for charity. Executives from brands like Wacoal, Lively, PVH Corp., Ross Stores and Miraclesuit all donned their finest attire as they gathered in the penthouse of 230 Fifth Avenue to mingle over fancy cocktails and the sounds of jazz singer Pucci Amanda Jhones. “I'm not sure who put together the gift bags, but usually it takes me a full day in the sun to turn the same shade of the lingerie that was in those bags,” Dr. Steven Flanagan, medical director at Rusk Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Health, told the crowd of more than 200 people as they nibbled on New York steak and ravioli. He was referring to the scarlet-colored, lacy thong that was a party favor. Guests at the 2019 Project HUG Gala in New York City. Courtesy Despite the light-hearted shenanigans, the event had a serious undertone. It helped raise more than $200,000 for the Hassenfeld Children's Hospital at NYU Langone and the PediatricFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
MILAN — Giambattista Valli has reorganized the schedule of the collections under the Giamba moniker. The strategy, which the designer developed for his Giamba line, founded in 2014 to complement the main Giambattista Valli line with playful, underground and somewhat sexy designs, includes the release of two collections a year, instead of four. According to a company spokesperson, the new strategy better responds to the needs of retailers that require getting products in stores early in the season. Giamba unveiled this course with the spring 2020 season, when the brand presented a single collection, unveiled to buyers in July in conjunction with the resort schedule. Giamba Resort 2020 Courtesy Photo Recently, the Roman designer, who also operates a couture line introduced in 2011, collaborated with Swedish fast-fashion giant H&M on a capsule collection, which was celebrated on Oct. 24 with a runway show followed by an event in his native city. In 2017, Artémis, the investment arm of the Pinault family, took a minority stake in the Giambattista Valli company. Artémis is the majority shareholder of the global luxury group Kering, led by François-Henri Pinault. It also owns the auction house Christie's; several prestigious vineyards, including Château Latour; the luxury cruise specialist Ponant; the Fnac Darty group; the weeklyFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — Kris Van Assche has found a way to combine his passion for Pierre Jeanneret furniture with his role as creative director of shoemaker Berluti. The designer is collaborating with the Paris-based Laffanour Galerie Downtown on 17 original Jeanneret furniture pieces from the Fifties, reupholstered in Berluti's signature patinated Venezia leather. The series will be presented in a showroom in Miami's Design District during Art Basel Miami Beach from Dec. 2 to 8. Van Assche has a longstanding relationship with François Laffanour, who specializes in pieces by design icons such as Charlotte Perriand, Jean Prouvé and Le Corbusier. The two previously collaborated on a series of light sculptures by Isamu Noguchi, including some customized by Van Assche, during his tenure at Dior Homme. This time around, Laffanour has restored a selection of pieces created by Jeanneret to furnish Chandigarh, the planned city designed by Le Corbusier after India's independence. Jeanneret, Le Corbusier's cousin, was appointed chief architect of the site and created complete lines of furniture for public and private buildings. Van Assche is something of a super-fan. Having bought his first Jeanneret pieces from Laffanour more than a decade ago, he estimates 80 percent of the furniture in his home is by theFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
MILAN — Two powerhouses are joining forces, each bringing its unique expertise. Prada and Adidas are launching a long-term collaboration with the goal to “investigate the realms of heritage, technology and innovation — and to challenge conventional wisdom through unexpected strategies,” the two companies said in a joint statement exclusively revealed to WWD. “The new vision draws inspiration from the rich legacies of both to reengineer timeless icons, and leverages the houses' technological footprint to innovate. The path is an evolving and dynamic structure composed of key milestones, marking a significant departure from existing patterns while building on the houses' strong milieu of shared approaches and pursuits.” The initial result of the collaboration will be the release of two limited-edition Prada for Adidas styles, with a first model to be launched for men and women globally in December and made entirely by Prada in Italy. The announcement follows a social media tease on Thursday, when both companies posted a photo on Instagram of Adidas and Adidas Originals shoe boxes peeking out of a classic white Prada shopping bag. The hashtag read #pradaforadidas. The Italian luxury goods house and the leading Germany-based sportswear brand are keeping details of the Prada for Adidas partnership under wraps for theFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
BEIJING — Most brands when they host a show in China, as Valentino did here on Thursday, amp up all the references to the country as much as possible. Not so for the Roman house, which debuted a new couture collection here, outside of its regular calendar. The venue was unmistakably Chinese–held on the northwestern edges of the city at the Aman Summer Palace, a resort that sits right at the doorstep of the former opulent retreat built for Qing dynasty emperors. But Valentino's creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli underscored, “it is a classic haute couture Italian collection,” Rather, Piccioli hoped people would think of it as a daydream, the title of this particular collection, in which two ancient capitals – Renaissance-era Rome and imperialistic Beijing – engage in a dialogue. He further elaborated: “It's keeping your identity and maintaining your diversity, but living together — which I think is good in life in general, not just for a collection.” Operatic music flowed through the series of narrow chambers and corridors of the Aman resort for a show that felt intimate despite its more than 600 guests. Just the night before, Valentino treated guests to dinner at TRB Hutong where there were parallel but contrastingFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
PARIS — It was upon discovering a pair of tiny 18th-century shoes in the archives of the Arts Décoratifs in Paris that curator Denis Bruna got the idea for the museum's latest exhibition: The shoes, which were worn by Marie-Antoinette in 1792, measured 21-cm. by 5-cm., corresponding to a European size 33. “How was it possible for a 37-year-old woman to put her adult feet in such a tiny shoe,” wondered Bruna, speaking at the press preview of “Marche et Démarche,” or “Walk and Gait” in English, on Wednesday, which runs until Feb. 23. “We realized that the shoes that we had in our archives from the 17th century to mid-19th century were all extraordinarily small and thin,” he continued. “It prompted us to wonder how our relationship to shoes and the act of walking has evolved throughout history.” Marie-Antoinette's shoe from 1792 Christophe Delliere By studying historical documents such as personal diaries, the curator discovered that aristocratic women like Marie-Antoinette and her court used to bind their toes in order to fit in tiny shoes, or simply wear half of them — the front part, just visible under their billowing skirts — which gave them a tottering, bird-like gait. At the time small feet wereFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
Johnathan Crocker, who served as president of Bldwn for the past two years, has exited the company at the expiration of his contract on Oct. 31. Crocker joined the American fashion label in late 2017 to evolve the brand beyond its Midwestern roots. He shortened the brand name from Baldwin, named after cofounders Matt and Emily Baldwin, to Bldwn, moved the design offices to Los Angeles and unveiled the brand's new direction inspired by American artists and architecture in spring 2019. He also opened the brand's first retail location under his direction in August at 8424 Melrose Place in California, located near Bottega Veneta. The store interior featured an elevated appearance inspired by American architects and artists such as Warren Platner and Ray Eames and was designed by Montalba Architects, who also created stores for The Row and Isabel Marant. Spring 2020, the last collection under Crocker's direction, was inspired by Donald Judd and the artist's home in Marfa, Tex. “It's been a distinct and sincere honor to have worked with Bldwn these last two years in defining the next chapter of the brand's story,” said Crocker. “I'm immensely proud of what we have achieved and look forward to seeing the brand continue toFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
Johnathan Crocker, who served as president of Bldwn for the past two years, has exited the company at the expiration of his contract on Oct. 31. Crocker joined the American fashion label in late 2017 to evolve the brand beyond its Midwestern roots. He shortened the brand name from Baldwin, named after cofounders Matt and Emily Baldwin, to Bldwn, moved the design offices to Los Angeles and unveiled the brand's new direction inspired by American artists and architecture in spring 2019. He also opened the brand's first retail location under his direction in August at 8424 Melrose Place in California, located near Bottega Veneta. The store interior featured an elevated appearance inspired by American architects and artists such as Warren Platner and Ray Eames and was designed by Montalba Architects, who also created stores for The Row and Isabel Marant. Spring 2020, the last collection under Crocker's direction, was inspired by Donald Judd and the artist's home in Marfa, Tex. “It's been a distinct and sincere honor to have worked with Bldwn these last two years in defining the next chapter of the brand's story,” said Crocker. “I'm immensely proud of what we have achieved and look forward to seeing the brand continue toFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
AMSTERDAM — Consumers need to be reassured — in more ways than one. Talk at the trade show Kingpins Amsterdam focused on how societal changes affect the denim industry, which is being forced into a structural transformation. This is first apparent on the trends side. “Talk of a new recession greatly affects the way people spend money,” said denim consultant Amy Leverton during the Kingpins Denim Trends conference, a factor that explains the nostalgia trend driven by the reign of Nineties-styles and Seventies high-waisted jeans. In the face of uncertainty, consumers stick to their basics. “Casual is key,” continued Leverton. “Elevated basics have become super important, in a rise of comfort that is linked to the ath-leisure trend. The paradigm of workwear has shifted: It has become possible to wear jeans as part of a more elevated look. It's all about a super-soft hand feel and comfortable silhouettes.” The return to basics can be felt on shop floors, according to denim manufacturer Elleti, which used its booth at Kingpins to show “Out of the Blue Impression,” an exhibition focused on the creativity of its mills. Using denim as a canvas, six artistic movements, from Cubism to Art Nouveau, were depicted on pairs of straight-legFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
AMSTERDAM — Consumers need to be reassured — in more ways than one. Talk at the trade show Kingpins Amsterdam focused on how societal changes affect the denim industry, which is being forced into a structural transformation. This is first apparent on the trends side. “Talk of a new recession greatly affects the way people spend money,” said denim consultant Amy Leverton during the Kingpins Denim Trends conference, a factor that explains the nostalgia trend driven by the reign of Nineties-styles and Seventies high-waisted jeans. In the face of uncertainty, consumers stick to their basics. “Casual is key,” continued Leverton. “Elevated basics have become super important, in a rise of comfort that is linked to the ath-leisure trend. The paradigm of workwear has shifted: It has become possible to wear jeans as part of a more elevated look. It's all about a super-soft hand feel and comfortable silhouettes.” The return to basics can be felt on shop floors, according to denim manufacturer Elleti, which used its booth at Kingpins to show “Out of the Blue Impression,” an exhibition focused on the creativity of its mills. Using denim as a canvas, six artistic movements, from Cubism to Art Nouveau, were depicted on pairs of straight-legFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
LONDON — Tracee Ellis Ross will host the Fashion Awards, which take place at Royal Albert Hall on Dec. 2. Ross, who helped found Hollywood's gender-equality movement Time's Up, is known for her Golden Globe-winning role as Dr. Rainbow Johnson on the ABC comedy series “Black-ish,” and for playing Joan Clayton on the long-running hit series “Girlfriends.” She is an executive producer on the ABC comedy show “Mixed-ish,” and recently wrapped production on the Focus Features comedy “Covers,” alongside Dakota Johnson, which is set for a May 2020 release. In April 2018, Ross opened the TED Conference, the first black woman to do so. In September, the actress/producer/comedian/activist unveiled her move into beauty with Pattern, a hair-care brand for the underserved curly, coily and tight-textured community. Ross is the founder and chief executive officer of the brand, which was 10-plus years in the making. As reported, Bottega Veneta, Gucci and Loewe are among the names competing for brand of the year at the London awards this year, along with Prada and Jacquemus, while Alessandro Michele, Daniel Lee, Jonathan Anderson and Kim Jones are all nominees for the accessories designer prize. Michele, Lee, Anderson, Jones and Miuccia Prada will also compete for the designer of the year prize. In September, Giorgio Armani was announced as theFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
LONDON — Tracee Ellis Ross will host the Fashion Awards, which take place at Royal Albert Hall on Dec. 2. Ross, who helped found Hollywood's gender-equality movement Time's Up, is known for her Golden Globe-winning role as Dr. Rainbow Johnson on the ABC comedy series “Black-ish,” and for playing Joan Clayton on the long-running hit series “Girlfriends.” She is an executive producer on the ABC comedy show “Mixed-ish,” and recently wrapped production on the Focus Features comedy “Covers,” alongside Dakota Johnson, which is set for a May 2020 release. In April 2018, Ross opened the TED Conference, the first black woman to do so. In September, the actress/producer/comedian/activist unveiled her move into beauty with Pattern, a hair-care brand for the underserved curly, coily and tight-textured community. Ross is the founder and chief executive officer of the brand, which was 10-plus years in the making. As reported, Bottega Veneta, Gucci and Loewe are among the names competing for brand of the year at the London awards this year, along with Prada and Jacquemus, while Alessandro Michele, Daniel Lee, Jonathan Anderson and Kim Jones are all nominees for the accessories designer prize. Michele, Lee, Anderson, Jones and Miuccia Prada will also compete for the designer of the year prize. In September, Giorgio Armani was announced as theFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
In another sign that Richemont is shaking up its underperforming fashion division, its Chloé maison named a new chief executive officer. Riccardo Bellini, currently ceo of Maison Margiela, will join Chloé effective Dec. 1, the house said in a statement on Thursday, confirming a report on WWD.com. Bellini is to succeed longtime Chloé ceo Geoffroy de la Bourdonnaye, who has navigated the house through several changes in creative direction and the death of founder Gaby Aghion in 2014. He had recently put the focus on the attributes of the Chloé girl, exalted at a dedicated cultural space in Paris that opened in 2017, housing the brand's archives, showrooms, a photography studio and exhibition space. De la Bourdonnaye has been at the management helm since 2010. Before that, he was ceo at London retailer Liberty and president at Christian Lacroix. He had joined the fashion industry after a long career at The Walt Disney Co. He piloted Chloé through several changes in designers, recruiting Clare Waight Keller from Pringle to succeed Hannah MacGibbon. When Waight Keller became the couturier at Givenchy in 2017, he tapped Natacha Ramsay-Levi from Louis Vuitton. It is understood Ramsay-Levi's contract runs through the spring. The affable executive also orchestrated 60th anniversaryFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
In another sign that Richemont is shaking up its underperforming fashion division, its Chloé maison named a new chief executive officer. Riccardo Bellini, currently ceo of Maison Margiela, will join Chloé effective Dec. 1, the house said in a statement on Thursday, confirming a report on WWD.com. Bellini is to succeed longtime Chloé ceo Geoffroy de la Bourdonnaye, who has navigated the house through several changes in creative direction and the death of founder Gaby Aghion in 2014. He had recently put the focus on the attributes of the Chloé girl, exalted at a dedicated cultural space in Paris that opened in 2017, housing the brand's archives, showrooms, a photography studio and exhibition space. De la Bourdonnaye has been at the management helm since 2010. Before that, he was ceo at London retailer Liberty and president at Christian Lacroix. He had joined the fashion industry after a long career at The Walt Disney Co. He piloted Chloé through several changes in designers, recruiting Clare Waight Keller from Pringle to succeed Hannah MacGibbon. When Waight Keller became the couturier at Givenchy in 2017, he tapped Natacha Ramsay-Levi from Louis Vuitton. It is understood Ramsay-Levi's contract runs through the spring. The affable executive also orchestrated 60th anniversaryFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]
Since John Galliano joined Maison Margiela as creative director in 2014, revenues at the Paris-based house have doubled — and it's become a byword for cool handbags and accessories. Margiela parent OTB, the Italian group controlled by Renzo Rosso, trumpeted those business achievements Tuesday as it revealed the renewal of Galliano's employment pact. The development, confirmed first to WWD, should squelch persistent speculation that the designer could leave or be poached, and suggests that Rosso's bold casting is starting to pay off. The length and terms of the new pact were not disclosed, but it is understood to span several years. “I believed John was the only person who could take this house five years ago, and I am even more convinced of this today,” Rosso said in a statement. “John's undisputed talent is only matched by his understanding of today's generations, their way of thinking, their struggles, their dreams. And he is doing exactly what this maison always did at its best — disrupt, innovate and inspire.” For his part, Galliano said: “I am super excited for this new chapter and grateful to Renzo for his belief in me and the vision for Maison Margiela.” Maison Margiela RTW Fall 2018 Giovanni Giannoni/WWD The maverick British designer hasFollow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.Read More... [...]