Shows

Kenneth Nicholson Men’s Spring 2019

Kenneth Nicholson pulls from a varied bag of interests. The Houston native is as motivated by 18th-century dress as he is by outfits from “Soul Train” and military uniforms — after attending the Academy of Art in San Francisco, Nicholson spent a one-year stint in the Navy before he was honorably discharged. But his overall interest is in expanding the boundaries of men’s wear.
“Historically, men haven’t been restricted to just a shirt and pants. They’ve had more options,” Nicholson said. “I like to edify people and shake things up.”
He divided his collection into three chapters. The first chapter was a stark white, which Nicholson said was void of color to express sadness. Models wore cotton and linen long-sleeved shirtdresses with subtle swing hems, white lace shirts paired with cream high-waisted pants, and a brocade jacket with an exaggerated lapel coupled with a matching skirt. References to royalty were sprinkled throughout the lineup. Some models wore sashes, others wore crowns and a couple of the more structured, beaded looks with mock necks, nipped waists and peplums, which were highlights from the collection, brought to mind regalness.
The second chapter, which signaled better memories and featured more color, was the strongest. Nicholson doubled

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/kenneth-nicholson/review/

      

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Death to Tennis Men’s Spring 2019

Summertime was the prevailing theme for William Watson and Vincent Oshin, the duo behind Death to Tennis. The designers, who are both British, were feeling nostalgic and a bit homesick so they looked to old beachside photographs to inform their lineup, which they said is one of their most colorful collections to date.
They leaned into the old and new, utilizing a color palette consisting of royal blue, purple, yellow, olive red and navy that brought to mind Ralph Lauren and Cross Colours from the Nineties.
These colors lent new life to core items such as graphic T-shirts, hoodies and the McCarthy jacket, which Justin Bieber popularized. They showed these signatures alongside cargo pants with minimal pockets, boxy button-up shirts, cotton parkas and shirt jackets. A long, hooded, colorblocked parka that grazed the ground was a standout.
The suit or matching set was another primary component. Models wore tracksuits, relaxed cotton suits and boxy shirts styled with slightly baggy pants. It was a nice take on tailored pieces that felt hip but not too trendy.
Death to Tennis is known for its original prints and this season it presented a camo pattern, a polo motif and a paint-splattered print.
Last season, the brand put on a

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/death-to-tennis/review/

      

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Romeo Hunte Men’s Spring 2019

Romeo Hunte didn’t make any friends in his men’s runway debut in New York. His choice of a site away from the other venues and the complete chaos in the lobby of the Dream Downtown Hotel with hundreds of people attempting to access elevators to get to the rooftop site was bad enough. The fact that his team couldn’t get its act together to start his show until nearly an hour after it was planned had everyone eyeing the exits before the first look came out.
Once the show finally started, it was clear that Hunte had an underwater sports adventure as his overriding theme. He used neoprene from diving wetsuits that he reimagined as performance vests in bright colors and cropped jackets with exaggerated necklines.

Camo prints in cargo pants and bombers and the use of safety orange enhanced the streetwear flair. But while the line showed some promise, there were several missteps, including poorly executed tailoring and some unfortunate sequined embellished sweatshirts. But apart from that, the collection was youthful and carefree.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/romeo-hunte/review/

      

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Todd Snyder Men’s Spring 2019

Todd Snyder closed New York Fashion Week: Men’s on a high note, sending out a feel-good collection full of bright colors and a youthful attitude that he titled “The American Tourist.”
“I played a lot with a mix of sartorial and campy references,” he said backstage before the show, where truffle popcorn and beer was served.

The opening look set the tone for the collection: a yellow T-shirt with a photo of a Waffle House that was taken by folk rocker Gerry Beckley of the group America. A series, all shot by the musician, are to make their debut for spring.

Snyder, the king of collaborations, unveiled other partnerships at the show including a line of terry-cloth bucket hats with Kangol, high-top tie-dye sneakers with Novesta, and perhaps the most striking, archival Hawaiian prints from Reyn Spooner that he used most successfully on an updated suit. “It’s the modern leisure suit,” he said.

His longtime partnership with Champion was also on display in bomber jackets, paneled sweatshirts and underwear. It even appeared as a side stripe on a plaid patterned suit.

Another play on the Americana theme came with the introduction of a new logo — “Snyder’s” in retro block letters — that he used

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/todd-snyder/review/

      

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Public School Men’s Spring 2019

Call it Public School part two.

On the final night of New York Fashion Week: Men’s, the streetwear-skewed brand held a party and presentation at a space on Howard Street in Chinatown with its theme kept under wraps until the doors opened.

“This is our space,” said Dao-Yi Chow, who designs the label with Maxwell Osborne. “This will be our first retail store and this is a soft launch of the space.”

Throughout the location were mannequins dressed in the new collection — although Chow said the description “needs an asterisk by ‘new.’ Everything is recycled, upcycled or dead stock,” he said, and is intended to represent our new philosophy.”

While the philosophy may be new, the lineup revisited the duo’s greatest hits.

They revisited collaborations with like-minded brands including Eileen Fisher, whose dead-stock silks became striped pajama-inspired ensembles; Levi’s, whose vintage denim was reworked into cropped trucker jackets, and Alpha Industries military fabrics made into sleek outerwear.

“It’s very much the foundation and our past and then looking into the future,” Osborne added.

The collection reflected that with a clear example being a supersharp black suit with built-in cargo pockets and statement zippers. A short-sleeve jumpsuit — also part of their DNA — was so elegant

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/public-school/review/

      

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Reconstruct Collective Men’s Spring 2019

Reconstruct Collective, consisting of five female designers, began out of necessity. After learning that the Willem de Kooning Academy wasn’t able to put on a fashion show for its graduating class, students banded together to organize their own show. And in order to raise money for the show, they needed to form a business with the chamber of commerce. Because they worked so well together, Laura Aanen, Alyssa Groeneveld, Kim Kivits, Michelle Lievaart and Sanne Verkleij decided to start a collective shortly after graduating. Now three collections in, the Amsterdam-based company opted to show in New York, which Groeneveld said made sense for the brand, which caters to the youth.
For spring the unisex line was based on a fictional place called Planet Re-4 and the fictional characters that live there. The lineup, which Groeneveld said falls between streetwear and couture, was made up of reconstructions of sporty pieces. They presented cropped bubble vests and matching miniskirts, wide-leg nylon pants decorated with multiple drawstrings or reflective material, cropped tank tops with the Re-4 logo and jackets made from strips of fabric. The waistbands displayed a graphic Reconstruct logo. They also reconfigured Converse tracksuits and pieces from The New Originals, an Amsterdam-based

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/reconstruct/review/

      

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Ricardo Seco Men’s Spring 2019

The 50th anniversary of the Mexico City Olympics served as the jumping off point for Ricardo Seco’s spring men’s collection.

The designer used stripes and optical illusions along with the late Sixties font and Olympics rings to pay homage to the 1968 Games. These graphics showed up in bombers, T-shirts and track pants that Seco reimagined in bright colors or vibrant black and white.

More contemporary visual elements such as cell phones and skates were used as accents inside jackets while the current immigration crisis was referenced by large DACA lettering on T-shirts and socks. Seco also went back to the beginning of the Black Power movement by using the now-famous fist symbol on tops.

The overall vibe of the collection felt upbeat despite the political references.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/?runway-review=ricardo-seco-mens-spring-1202756832

      

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Bode Men’s Spring 2019

Aaron Aujla, owner of Green River Project, a furniture and interiors firm, was Emily Bode’s primary reference point this season. She met Aujla in New York and they’ve previously worked together on other projects. (He’s created all of the furniture for Bode’s presentations.)
For her collection, Bode drew from Aujla’s lineage. His family is from India, but he grew up in British Columbia. Bode has always outsourced her embroidery and embellishment work in India, but this season she worked with more Indian textiles that had historical significance. She made suits from Khadi towels, an Indian fabric and developed another suit from India’s government subsidized mill prints.
Bode said the Khadi fabric has a connection to Mahatma Gandhi’s self-reliance movement, which urged Indians to bring weaving back into the home as opposed to buying these goods from other countries.
Highlights included a white fringed button-up shirt made of chenille, a pair of floral print high-waisted pants constructed from curtain fabric, and a bright yellow matching set printed with a village motif that consisted of a crepe de chine shirt and duchesse-satin pants.
The furniture was influenced by Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray’s 1966 “Nayak,” which was filmed on a train, and each of the pieces were

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/bode/review/

      

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Head of State Men’s Spring 2019

For his first runway show, Nigerian-born designer Taofeek Abijako, took inspiration from Afrofuturism and paraded a lineup with a distinct Seventies feel.
Cue an array of high-waisted cropped and flared pants, fitted sweatshirts and message T-shirts.
The standouts were the flared pants, worn with matching boots, which gave it a New York Seventies vibe.
Head of State is now part of Groupe, a distribution umbrella formed by James and Gwendolyn Jurney of Seize sur Vingt, which manages and nurtures independent designers and brands. Abijako was the first brand chosen, allowing him to focus strictly on creating the collection while Groupe provides the funding for samples and production.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/head-of-state/review/

      

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N. Hoolywood Men’s Spring 2019

This season, the N. Hoolywood designer Daisuke Obana delivered a lineup inspired by Native American artist T.C. Cannon, whose work he discovered during a recent trip to Arizona.
“The lines and the bold colors in the artist’s paintings were what drew me to them,” he said backstage, pointing to an array of blanket-like pieces, often paired with matching oversize shorts. This graphic inspiration was seen in everything from cropped bomber jackets and knitwear with fringe across the chest to oversize pants.
An added surprise was Obana’s collaboration with sportswear brand Umbro. It spanned logo T-shirts, long-sleeved soccer jerseys and elongated coats adorned with oversize Umbro logos done up in bright colors with vertical lines that tied back to Cannon’s paintings.
With their mix of deconstruction and surprising proportions, Obana’s Japanese silhouettes seamlessly blended the worlds of artisanal and active sport.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/n-hoolywood/review/

      

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Jahnkoy Men’s Spring 2019

Jahnkoy’s Maria Kazakova, who is Siberian and studied at Central Saint Martins and Parsons, has received a lot of support from the industry with her brand narrative, which is centered on preserving traditional craftsmanship and reworking it for a new generation.
She was shortlisted for the 2017 LVMH Prize and has found fans in consultant Julie Gilhart and Bruce Pask, the men’s fashion director at Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus. Kazakova also has the support of Puma, Swarovski and the CFDA’s Elaine Gold Launch Pad program.
Her goal has always been to connect larger companies with local artisans, but with the extra help she’s been able to expand on that and bring more makers from Brooklyn and India into the mix. The show, which was more like a theatrical art project, was a collective effort as well. Titled “Deceived: No More,” the performance explored how the fashion industry impacts cultural identity. The presentation, which was choreographed by Nathan Trice, was broken up into three parts: chaos, unification and order. Much like her previous presentations, she made the runway mimic a chaotic city street that was dotted with orange cones and caution signs — one read “Separation is No Longer Cool.”
Kazakova called the

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/jahnkoy/review/

      

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Nihl Men’s Spring 2019

In his New York show, Neil Grotzinger of Nihl, the LVMH Prize finalist, broke traditional rules of masculinity with a collection that centered around bending the rules of those in authority.
He took police officers, football players and Wall Street brokers and turned their wardrobes on their head by “exploring the qualities of borderline ephemerality and downright queerness,” according to the liner notes.

A clear example was a pair of football pants made from fine white silk he paired with a handmade chain mail tank top. An authentic crinkled painter’s tarp — black on one side, green on the other with drawstrings included — was reinterpreted as pants and a top.

Grotzinger’s use of elaborate embroidery techniques appeared as embellishments on several pieces, including the sleeves of sheer tops and a sliced-open basketball short.

The use of revealing cutouts and jock straps throughout the collection added a level of eroticism while enhancing the masculinity of the offering.

“The concepts of masculinity can be very restrictive and I like to break the conformity of that,” Grotzinger said.

In this debut, Grotzinger gained a lot of attention by breaking the rules — in the right way.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/nihl/review/

      

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Gustav von Aschenbach Men’s Spring 2019

In its third season, Robert Geller’s Gustav von Aschenbach seems to be finally developing its own identity.
Although a younger and more fun offshoot of the designer’s main line, the collection still has Geller’s signature, with its traditional boxy silhouettes, washed cotton fabrics and saturated tones.
But G.V.A., as the line is now being called, has more of a streetwear edge. The use of logos, slogans and appliquéd photographs spoke to Geller’s love of Swiss graphic design and typography — as evidenced by the word Basel used on garments throughout.
“The G.V.A. kid is evolving into a young artist, who expresses himself through individualistic, self-confident clothes,” Geller said.
Some of this artistic expression shone through in a creative casting mix of models and New York street dancers that added a jolt of energy and fun to the show.
Among the highlights was an array of light outerwear, from trenchcoats and cropped field jackets to utility varsities. Embellished with the graphic details, these became one-of-a-kind pieces.
Geller’s ability to create a younger alter-ego allows him to channel trendier and more of-the-now pieces. But coupled with his more romantic and mature Robert Geller collection, these two sides of his personality seem perfectly aligned.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/gustav-von-aschenbach-by-robert-geller/review/

      

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Sundae School Men’s Spring 2019

What is smokewear? According to Dae Lim, who designs Sundae School, it’s a category of clothing that’s not confined to weed smokers but supportive of recreational weed smoking in subtle and overt ways.
Lim grew up in Seoul, where marijuana usage is still illegal, but came to the U.S. 11 years ago and was introduced to it as a teen. After studying math at Harvard, he joined McKinsey & Co. as a consultant but decided that wasn’t the environment for him and got a job at VFiles as the head of growth. He used his resources there to create Sundae School, which is a year old and started out with mostly graphic T-shirts and dad hats emblazoned with stoner puns. But for his spring 2019 collection, he expanded on his original proposition with a proper apparel collection that’s titled Ddul-Sunbi — ddul is a slang term teens in Korea use for weed and sunbi means scholar.
He imagined a world where scholars explored weed and collaborated with South Korean illustrator Yeonbun on a graphic depicting that scenario. He also looked to hanbok, traditional Korean dress, to present a neutral lineup of casual but refined clothing. Models wore mostly leisure suits that consisted of lightweight poly jackets with tie

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/sundae-school/review/

      

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Parke & Ronen Men’s Spring 2019

Leave it to Parke & Ronen to transport tired, hot New Yorkers to a beach in Malibu on a Tuesday afternoon in July.
“It’s all about L.A., baby,” said codesigner Parke Lutter backstage before the show.
He and Ronen Jehezkel trotted out a lovely array of pastel colors, floral prints and retro graphic stripes on swimwear, coverups and short-sleeve sweaters.
“We threw in a little Eighties vibe — we were listening to the Go-Go’s,” Lutter said, adding that the silhouette this season was classic but modernized with a little higher waist and more of a boxy feel.
The sheer shirts and pajama sets spoke of the leisurely lifestyle while the sleeveless hooded sweatshirts pushed a more athletic vibe.
With a soundtrack that included Lady Gaga’s “Boys, Boys, Boys” and Rod Stewart’s “Do You Think I’m Sexy,” Parke & Ronen proved that even after 21 years, they can still get a crowd energized while building on a successful business.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/parke-ronen/review/

      

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Feng Chen Wang Men’s Spring 2019

Feng Chen Wang thought about the word “half” and what it means for human connection.
The show started with an opening of the curtains, which streamed sunlight into the dark space and emphasized the collection’s vivid color palette, which Wang said was meant to convey a range of human emotions.
The opening looks came in an icy blue gradient — sad — and progressed into an iridescent green and a warm hot pink — happy. Things ended with shades of black and gray, which Wang said played on black and white and the idea of half, or yin and yang.
The garments were amalgamations of sportswear basics. Wang placed double collars on long trenchcoats and pieced together two Levi’s jackets to make one. She did the same thing with Converse sneakers by adding an extra sole and merging two sneaker halves together. An extra leg was added to jeans and the more dramatic pieces consisted of collared shirts and trenchcoats that were draped on top of each other and fell down to the floor.
Some of these pieces revealed the heart, another means to depict feelings. Wang discovered that different sentiments lead to different body temperatures and she presented PVC pieces to highlight the

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/feng-chen-wang/review/

      

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Monique Lhuillier RTW Spring 2019

For the first time, Monique Lhuillier chose to present her spring collection in Paris before New York. She explained hers “is a celebratory brand…it’s joyous, and I kept seeing my woman in the French countryside, in this vast garden-like setting.” So she opted to shoot the season’s look book in such a scene.
“The collection is carefree, elegant and playful,” Lhuillier continued of the line, with more sleek, deflated silhouettes than in the past, and featuring colors such as rose, “sea foam” and emerald green. “I feel there’s this whole sense of people wanting to feel elegant and dressed, but they want that ease.”
Also for spring, Lhuillier added 3-D embroideries and embroidery over sequins. A standout with the latter technique was the fitted long dress with white and pink flowers embroidered across a sheer tulle top and silver sequined skirt.
Daywear looks included a linear dress in tulle with black and white butterflies and a strapless dress in navy blue tulle with white polka dots and a matching cape-like layer.
Lhuillier’s signature gowns still peppered the collection and will please her brand’s longstanding fans, but the enriched selection for day should catch their eye — and that of others — too.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/spring-2019/paris/monique-lhuillier/review/

      

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Victor Li Men’s Spring 2019

For his debut collection, designer Victor Li wanted to create a wardrobe centered around items from his own closet — but with a lifestyle edge and with each individual look serving a particular purpose, whether that was something perfect for an island getaway or simply running to the grocery store.
The lineup featured hand-drawn patterns created from a mashup of the design team’s faces, which were seen on everything from casual shirts and Ts to rectangular leather patches. Casual yet fitted silhouettes included jackets and modern suits in fresh cuts, finished with idiosyncratic details such as bow ties on the pockets of shirts and trenches.
The color palette ranged from soft creams to pinks, baby blues and soft greens, which added a refined touch to the offering.
To the trained eye, Li’s debut collection was reminiscent of contemporary European brands and it definitely brought a much-needed refined and elegant vibe for the man seeking an escape from the oversaturated offering of streetwear.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/victor-li/review/

      

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Willy Chavarria Men’s Spring 2019

Models running wind sprints and stretching in colorful soccer gear on the runway prior to the show created the ideal introduction for Willy Chavarria’s new collaboration with Danish soccer brand Hummel.
The collection was defined by the use of bright colors and long boxy silhouettes in shorts and tops that paid homage to the designer’s main line. His creative use of the Hummel logo and soccer uniform staples such as numbers and insignias turned them into streetwear-infused details.
The collaboration will also serve to offer sponsorships to New York City soccer players with documented and undocumented U.S. citizens offering support to immigrants, another key element of this season for Chavarria.
His spin on soccerwear served as part one of a two-part spring collection.
For his main line, Chavarria said he pulled from Latino culture of the early Aughts on the East and West Coasts. The “baggy silhouettes” from Venice and Culver City were juxtaposed with the “long rise pants tucked into Timberlands” that defined the urban landscape in the Bronx and Harlem in that era.
The nostalgia kicked into high gear with Chavarria’s take on Polo Sport references: upside-down American flags, yellow trenchcoats and the word America printed upside down on the front of sweatshirts.
There was also

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/willy-chavarria/review/

      

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Taakk Collection Men’s Spring 2019

Yosuke Demukai has a way with textiles. The Japanese designer, who started Taakk six years ago, develops all of his own fabrics and for spring, he was influenced by what he sees every day. This translated into nylon pants and T-shirts covered in a print of a sunset he sees in from his studio window, jacquard overalls and pants that looked like denim — he bleached and overdyed the fabric for a different effect — and water-repellent organza parkas. One of the most interesting pieces were tracksuits that appeared as if they were leather, but were actually made from a coated knit.
It was lots of new ideas, but the collection lacked a cohesive statement.

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Via:: https://wwd.com/runway/mens-spring-collections-2019/new-york/taakk-collection/review/

      

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