Shows

Alexander McQueen Men’s Fall 2018

Sarah Burton lets fantasy take flight like few designers working today, but for her fall collection for Alexander McQueen, she drew inspiration from closer to home: the many faces of the British male.
The designer conjured an eclectic mental collage: Savile Row tailoring; Perry Ogden’s photographs of Irish pony kids; East End boys and Samuel Beckett. Then there was founder Lee Alexander McQueen himself, who she recalled was fond of camel coats, shearling jackets and Crombie coats.
It translated into a savvy mix of archetypes, expressed via everything from a pinstriped suit and a distressed mohair sweater to a bounty of deconstructed outerwear.
“It was taking this very classic British wardrobe and subverting it, turning it on its head,” she explained backstage. “It was almost like making each garment of the wardrobe very, very McQueen, so it wasn’t so much about a fantasy journey, it was more about something very grounded in reality.”
Hence, suit jackets were nipped in at the waist to explode the shoulders. Featherweight slim trenchcoats came tied around the waist like long skirts. Bomber jackets, pea coats and an oversized patchwork leather duffle coat featured trompe-l’oeil double zips that created the illusion of layering.
There was plenty of the house’s signature

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Pringle of Scotland Men’s Fall 2018

For the first collection under Gaby Day’s tenure as head of men’s wear, Pringle focused on its Scottish homeland — particularly the Shetland Isles — for a fall collection that borrowed from its land and traditions.
The palette reached for earth neutrals provided by the environment, from mossy, olive and sage greens, to the brash yellow of gorse — a painfully prickly springtime shrub — and natural variations of wool itself.
Shetland wool, with its coarser hand, resulted in chunkier pieces, like a fisherman’s cardigan fastened by metal clips, or a sweater bisected down the middle and featuring inverted black-and-white and white-on-black patterns.
But the isles also lent their traditions, and the achievements of its star produce. One handmade jumper featured a patch that looked like two halves of geometric Taatit rugs — a Nordic import found from Finland to Ireland — had been knitted together, as they were at weddings, while a thinner gauge allowed those geometric patterns to become a jumble of graphic ribbons. Elsewhere still, they became a textural loose knit pattern.
Climbing references, in graphic patches or in the handful of mountaineering-inspired outerwear, weren’t to Ben Nevis — Scotland’s highest summit, culminating at 1,345 meters above sea level — but a

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Loewe Men’s Fall 2018

The elves in the Loewe atelier had been hard at work, with a range of handiwork-intensive goodies, from the house’s new hand-stitched boat shoe made from a single piece of leather to white shirts covered in sailor’s knots.
“It’s about refocusing on the craft and the details,” said Jonathan Anderson, who continued to push the boundaries of skin with a multitude of propositions. Case in point: Using the pockets on a cargo pant to showcase the results of the latest experimentations, like a leather corduroy with hand-scraped grooves, and a range of washes.
Needlepoint-style nature designs on bags were made by laser-cutting holes in the leather. The house’s popular jester-style Dino sneakers with curved toes had also been added to the men’s offer, available in regular low-top but also high-top versions. He also added messenger bags in tan leather and shearling, chiming with the season’s Nineties obsession.
Takeaways included a striped fleece jogger, cropped workwear-inspired denim, a Seventies-flavored patchwork shearling and a supercool caramel puffer bomber.
Looks came tricked with fresh updates on the designer’s cute till-ringer accessories like mini sheepskin cross-body purses and squirrel-shaped key rings, with the childish sensibility extending to details like oversized buttons on coats.
Tartans and wooly blanket fabrics underscored

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Cerruti Men’s Fall 2018

Jason Basmajian reined in the silhouettes this season, sending out a collection of tailored pieces that gently relayed a message of back-to-work.
The designer cast a wide net in the inspiration department, citing post-punk, military and streetwear looks as influences but managed to bring them together, partly through a series of cinched waists that recurred throughout the collection.
Trousers were slimmed down, while the waists rose higher. Belts were knotted, most of them, creating pleats in the back — on a fleece-lined bomber jacket, a lengthy puffer coat in black and shiny brown overcoats in waxed leather. Pouch belts also played a role in the belt-tightening exercise.
The logo made a few appearances, running neatly across the front of a plum top in one instance.
Working the soft autumn hues in khaki, plum, mustard and black, Basmajian also sent a graphic, Bauhaus-style motif down the runway, pairing jackets in the rich fabric with cropped pants.
The show’s looser side came in the form of oversized coats in various check motifs, a nod to the Eighties, as the label continues its push to bring the swinging Nino Cerruti aesthetic to a new generation.

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Vetements Men’s Fall 2018

With the fashion world’s eyes glued to the next fashion moves of Vetements, as the kings of appropriation, anyone expecting a change of tactic would have been disappointed.
Instead, Demna Gvasalia, looking “the elephant in the room” right in the face, went back to his designer roots, “and back to the [Martin] Margiela approach.”
“It’s very personal, I wanted to show what Margiela means for me and Vetements. It’s an approach, it’s a way of loving clothes, breaking the rules with those clothes,” said the designer backstage.
But he did it his own way, of course, with his signature mash-up of signs and prints, thrift-store sportswear collages and Eastern European peasant styling, with silhouettes built from piled-up oversized shirts in a jumble of prints and headscarves.
But the collection also had a softer, chicer side to it, like the opening look pairing a belted bourgeois fur coat flipped inside out to expose the nylon lining, matched with a polka dot scarf. Or a look fusing a floral black prairie dress to the outside of a reversed khaki trench, with printed full bodysuits, or “morph suits,” worn under a lot of the women’s looks.
This idea of turning oversized jackets around to expose the tags was very

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Faith Connexion Men’s Fall 2018

In a marked contrast with the creative chaos of its previous collections, Faith Connexion chose to refocus for fall, paring things back and concentrating on reworking favorites from collections past. “We want to mature the brand and step back a bit, but it will always stay frenetic,” said Magnus Dekker, one of the collaborative brand’s designers. While much of Faith Connexion’s fun appeal has always been in its bold, outgoing designs and collaborations, in Dekker’s words, “You sometimes couldn’t see the wood for the trees.”
Much of the lineup was coed, like the rising brand’s ongoing collaboration with Kappa featuring sequin-clad track pants, found here in red in a button-up style. Another tie-up, with K-Way featured a reversible fake fur jacket that was loud but proud. Among the sporty references, there were extralong football scarves featuring the Faith Connexion logo (appearing for the first time, believe it or not) that if successful, are likely to put the label on the map at a scale beyond its current fashion insider status. Speaking of geography, Faith Connexion will be opening up Asia in the next couple of months, according to its president Maria Buccellati.
On the tailored side — blazers are the brand’s bestsellers —

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Hed Mayner Men’s Fall 2018

For his third show in Paris, Israeli designer Hed Mayner charted a course through a nautical theme.
There was a melancholy mood to the voluminous jackets with sleeves falling to the fingertips, back-to-front shirting mimicking a sailor suit, and in the outerwear, some of which were capes crafted from recycled sails.
“They’re things that you go to sleep in, pieces in which you have a life,” he said backstage. Even the landlocked will get mileage out of boiled wools in a palette of navy and grays that spoke of cold-weather strategies from a time before technical materials. Extrawide trousers that pooled at the ankle and collars turned up as high as they’d go, and then some had something of Corto Maltese to them.
The waters between utilitarian and tailored clothing can often be rough, filled with oversized proportions and unflattering silhouettes. In reframing tailored outerwear and suiting into a form of workwear by playing with scale — magnifying and downsizing is one of his signatures — Mayner found his way to a safe harbor between the two.

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Ambush Men’s Fall 2018

For Yoon Ahn, a trip back to Seattle and Oregon last summer brought back memories of youth, when comfortable, practical clothes were combined with thrift store finds. “I translated that to how I would wear it now,” said the ultracool designer at her Paris presentation.
Outdoor staples like fleece and waterproof fabrics were usurped in this unisex offering, reshaped and layered in surprising ways. Suits were worn loose — they never quite fit when they’re secondhand, after all. A poppy motif adorned a sheer white fabric on shirts, giving a bucolic touch to certain looks that worked well as a contrast.
In one look, an oversized wide-brimmed felt hat embroidered with a sporty “A” was meant to recall a mountain ranger. It would incidentally hold off the rain with far more street cred than a humble umbrella. It was paired with a deconstructed plaid flannel shirt, worn like a crop top and skirt with fishtail sleeves and spliced with a khaki raincoat.
With the jewelry — where the label started out — Ahn also waxed nostalgic, working glass beads into a romantic, colorful shower of rain drops and deviating from previous, harder collections.
While the references were familiar, the self-taught designer, who cofounded the

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Amiri Men’s Fall 2018

Mike Amiri’s first full-on presentation in Paris was something of a ceremony. Let’s call it a rite of passage. In the ornate chapel of the Beaux-Arts, Amiri laid out hundreds of candles and flowers as the backdrop, with his models — both girls and boys — walking down a patchwork of oriental rugs to the rock soundtrack of California-based musician Goth Babe playing live in the background.
Inspired by watching “The Lost Boys” when he was a kid, Amiri channeled a glammed-up vampire theme. Kiefer Sutherland’s toothy leer even featured on the glitter-clad T-shirts and was painted onto the back of a black biker jacket. “Vampires are fabulous,” said Amiri backstage after the show.
“These are the kids I saw when I was too young to hang out with them,” said the designer, explaining the inspiration. “It’s about how do I take pieces of that and put it into my collection without having this overly done cinematic thing?”
Superskinny jeans — one of the designer’s staples — got the glam treatment, glittering with an array of surface treatments, many with rips at the knee.
A brushed mohair plaid coat was paired with silver pants, while a tuxedo was done in red velvet with glinting

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Napa Martine Rose Men’s Fall 2018

In a departure from her two previous capsules for Napapijri, London-based Martine Rose tapped Nineties indie music culture — think The Stone Roses — and Inuit clothing for a more rough-and-ready take this season. The Italian brand’s heritage curly fleece was reinterpreted in a jacquard floral pattern, while giant reversible down coats were worked in an outsize check that had a touch of the folklore about them, adding interest. Big sweaters that would long have been extremely uncool and beige corduroy jeans complemented the lineup, which was punctuated by cross-body bags intended to cut through the shapes of the distinctly oversize outerwear.

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Vionnet Pre-Fall 2018

The fantastic, underwater world described by Jules Verne in his “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” novel served as the main inspiration for the Vionnet pre-fall collection.
Marine creatures popped up on the pretty multicolor plissé tops and maxidresses featuring shimmering effects and a pattern of micro wales decorated a range of fluid pieces, including a chic tea dress and a effortless elegant pajama set, both worked in an eco-friendly silk.
The elegant look, which included a wide range of draped and bias-cut frocks, including a pretty style crafted from interwoven grosgrain, was peppered by sporty accents, including elastic belts punctuating the frocks. They were inspired by the tennis outfits of Billie Jean King, one of the most successful tennis players of all-time who is also a feminist icon. Her style echoed in a chic tennis-inspired set, featuring a draped mini skirt paired with a T-shirt with the plissé front sprayed to obtain a pinstriped effect.
With this lineup, which offered a varied wardrobe for sophisticated woman, Vionnet scored the match point.

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Junya Watanabe Man Fall 2018

It must be nearly impossible to pry Junya Watanabe out of a specialist camping or trekking store. His fascination with functional garments and detailing was as obvious on his fall runway as a moose in the middle of a hiking path.
Reflective stripes, rugged patches, zippers and pockets galore were the features of this outdoors-y collection, which was heavy on meaty outerwear and the types of pants and sweaters a very stylish longshoreman might wear.
The show had an easy confidence and the clothes were masculine, handsome and approachable. The gadgetry was impressive: Some jackets converted to bags and vice versa, while some coats were worn as backpacks, or boasted built-in backpacks.
A pioneer in inviting specialist manufacturers to realize his designs, Watanabe rolled out a collaboration with Canada Goose on a range of technical outerwear inspired by archival models. The dark and generously sized parka, duffle coat and coach’s jacket that helped open the show were particularly striking. Other collaborations included Karrimor, Filson, Gloverall, Carhartt, Levi’s, New Balance and Heinrich Dinkelacker.
Unfortunately, the bounty of other labels and logos on display sometimes made it seem like Au Vieux Campeur or Paragon Sports put on a highfalutin’ fashion show with a bouncy techno soundtrack.
It

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13 Bonaparte Men’s Fall 2018

13 Bonaparte continues to develop its vocabulary of architecturally inclined contemporary men’s wear in its non-seasonal Collection 12. Founder David Sarfati, who cites luminaries such as Oscar Niemeyer as influences, said his lineups are envisioned as midseason ranges dotted with outlying seasonal items. For winter, those would be a generous navy double-breasted coat or a long silhouette in all-over dark gray pinstripe.
Rather than positioning the brand within the elevated utility and sports movement, the driving impression for fall was of a uniform fit for gallery owners and art critics. Neutral tones of black, greys and olive abounded in this very monochromatic iteration, standing alongside vibrant yellow — a hue being touted as “Gen Z Yellow,” soon to supersede Millennial pink.
But being seasonless didn’t isolate the collection from of-the-moment notions like revisiting normal clothing, or expanding on the capsule of women’s wear explored in Le Denim. Unlike others tapping into men’s wear for women slipstream, Sarfati acknowledged this small but keen segment of his clientele would be served through a compact denim offering that included skirts — a crafty mini that looked like jeans legs reassembled — or even dresses, as well as the expected adapted men’s wear, but that there were no

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I’m Isola Marras Pre-Fall 2018

For pre-fall, Efisio Marras imagined a contemporary Scheherazade living her adventures in the Nevada desert rather than among the Arabian dunes. She becomes the heroine of a sort of video game or manga comic where colors are bold and everything is infused with a Pop touch.
Chiffon tunics and fluid pants were splashed with an all-over print infused with a Generation Y romanticism and a gold plissé velvet off-the-shoulder jumpsuit featured logo bands running down the sleeves and the legs.
Tailoring got an adventurous makeover with a playful skirt suit peppered by utilitarian details and a classic British tartan fabric was crafted for boyish shorts worn with a nylon parka.
The young and fun collection also included beautifully crafted knits, such as an oversized sweater showing a desert scene rendered in bright neon tones.

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XB OFCL by Brandon Sun Men’s Fall 2018

The saying goes that once you hit rock bottom, the only way is up. Not so long ago, Brandon Sun was offering a dystopian vision with military and run-down urban mobility — imagine the “Dark Angel” universe — in which things literally were tied together with strings. Now he’s focusing on the light at the end of the tunnel, the sense of coming together and out on the other side. Lyrics from Guns ‘n’ Roses hit “November Rain” featured heavily on items, stating “never mind the darkness / we can still find a way.”
This season, the American designer widely channeled Americana and its cowboy ideal for men, as part of a reflection on what it means to be American. “In both cases, what it means has changed recently, and for men, that macho, cool and in control cowboy is no longer relevant,” he said during a showroom appointment. The lineup was rife with the familiar trappings of Western shirts, washed denims — these are starting to crop up on women, too — leather jackets, belts and buckles.
That didn’t mean Sun abandoned his signature splicing, reworking plaid patterns into sparse Western shirts, putting together jackets that were, say, half field jacket on

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Maison Michel Pre-Fall 2018

Priscilla Royer channeled a good girl vibe for pre-fall, taking her inspiration from Catherine Deneuve’s role in Roman Polanski’s 1965 psychological thriller “Repulsion” – the part before she starts murdering her suitors, that is. “It’s pretty, rather than sexy,” said Royer.
Innovative rainproofing techniques, reversible solutions and an overwhelming choice of shapes, as ever, meant there was something for everyone here, and for every occasion.
For a walk in the park, there were royal blue, beige, russet and gray wool designs, some adorned with tartan or checked ribbons attached with belt buckles, others in all-over blue tartan.
For work, there were wool fedoras circled with a houndstooth ribbon, or for the more outgoing, a reversible cloth cap in the same check fabric with the house’s familiar cat’s ears, beige on the one side, black and white on the other for maximum versatility. A dusty pink velvet beret was also particularly cute.
Out on a date, meanwhile, the pretty girl came into her own, sporting a cap with a jacquard rose motif, another with a wrap front in a metallic lurex fabric and a third molded version, with the cat’s ears, covered with little bows.
The rose motif was more understated but very feminine when embroidered

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Christopher Kane Pre-Fall 2018

“It’s all the things I love – diamonds, neon, feathers. I OD’d on diamonds – but I couldn’t help it,” said Christopher Kane of his attention-grabbing collection, which also featured horror movie graphics and neon lace.
A ribbed cashmere sweater shimmered with crystal fringes, a leather dress was trimmed with ostrich feathers while tailored black jackets and curve-hugging sweater dresses alike flashed long diamante fringe. Kane even adorned his princess pumps with rhinestone frills.
All the pieces that didn’t sparkle or swish were neon bright, as in the big flowers on a long and sheer devoré jersey dress; the ribbed cashmere sweaters in shades like chartreuse, and the black dresses adorned with flashes of orange or yellow lace.
It’s hard to believe this flashy collection also took its inspiration from one of Kane’s favorite places in England, the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery in Stoke-on-Trent. A big Royal Doulton fan (see his spring/summer 2018 collection) Kane shot his pre-fall look book there and created a lineup of beautiful dresses and skirts, some in leather with raw, uneven edges that were meant to evoke broken plates and bits of china.

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Jil Sander Men’s Fall 2018

Technical but cozy was one of the key directions for Lucie and Luke Meier’s debut men’s effort for the house, presented as a softer, more positive and human spin on futurism, hooked on the kinds of pieces one might really want to wear when in need of a bit of cocooning while vacating planet Earth.
“It’s this idea of going into space, but not abandoning your rituals,” said Lucie, with Luke quipping: “Like, halfway there you might want a nice cup of coffee.”
The design duo gravitated to the white cotton duvet coats – also revisited in a technical organza – with matching horizontal messenger bags that could double as a pillow slung across.
For the shapes, the designers wanted enveloping, swaddling, bigger volumes “but for it to be controlled.” Neat details included fully-molded aluminum buttons.
The protectionist spirit was in keeping with the times, but it was the more down-to-Earth pieces that worked best, like the classic topcoats with rounded shoulders and detachable fur hoods, a white mac edged with a thick silver leather tape on the lining to hold the construction, textured but minimal outerwear and a simple black suit with graphic white contrast topstitching.
A plain, old school, single-breasted gray suit layered

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Golden Goose Deluxe Brand Men’s Fall 2018

Golden Goose Deluxe Brand’s man is getting his hands dirty for fall. The Italian label combined high-end fabrics with innovative finishes that gave them a worn-in look, as if the wearer had just finished working in the garage and had rubbed his oily hands on his clothes. This use of cut and surface treatments made for an appealing play on high-low. A red velvet tuxedo, for example, was given a darker sprayed finish for a grubby luxe look, while baggy knits were woven in a combination of yarns for a similar effect.
In the same vein, a long black suede jacket was polished on its top half for a leather finish but left raw on the bottom, making for an interesting mix of textures, while the surface of a black calf skin bomber was scratched by hand to create a mottling of black and brown, making each one unique.
The blue collar references make their way into the collection in other ways, too, as in a reflective striped tape down the side of a pair of navy pants, or the loose cut of a pair of beige corduroy worker pants. The brand’s sneakers also got the worn-in treatment, roughed up by hand

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Nïuku Men’s Fall 2018

Befitting Nïuku’s position as a buzzy brand – thanks in part to its presence among the 2017 ANDAM finalists – the scene at their first show on the Paris men’s wear schedule was wild, guests crushing to get into the brand’s show space.
Exits identifying as men’s wear came at a rapid fire pace, worn on boys and girls alike. The premise was not exactly novel, but was done with gusto. “Unisex is no longer a question today as new generations just pick up items they like regardless of who it was for. For us, ‘unisex’ is not a concept, it’s being part of our time,” said Lenny Guerrier after the show.
As expected, the trio formed by Guerrier, Kadiata “Kadjahdjah” Nïuku Diallo and Riad Trabelsi spiked the current Nineties sportswear vibe with men’s tailoring inspirations lifted across the 20th century. While coats, be they wide wale corduroy or green boiled wool with raw edges, looked solid but staid, as did retooled nylon shell suits, courtesy of their sponsor Reebok.
Jackets with their lapels looped over the shoulder as scarves, a baby pink shell suit sliced under the arms to form looser skin-baring sleeves, or a partially unzipped bomber drop backwards in a

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Sean Suen Men’s Fall 2018

Beijing-born Sean Suen — who studied graphic design and fine arts before veering off into fashion — presented a cinematic collection that tapped into the doomed fate of one of its most famous inhabitants, China’s last emperor Puyi. During a preview, the designer mentioned that he had recently seen the 1987 Bertolucci film and that the generational perception of the man seemed to evolve from a semi-villainous focal point, to a remote historical figure.
In keeping with the Chinese designer’s previous efforts, the lineup focused on tailored shapes, silhouettes retained a monastic “East-meets-West” sensibility by borrowing indiscriminately from martial outfits, classic tailoring and workwear.
Suen’s painterly sensibilities come to express themselves through his sartorial work, and lend themselves to this kind of implicit storytelling. But even without knowing the igniting thought, the slow descent from the imperial throne to a form of layman anonymity was clear, say, in the gradual softening of the shoulders — from the stricture of a shoulder cape to the roundness of the natural articulation — as it was in textures. Suen went from the richness of a wool embossed with an astrakhan pattern on a voluminous fur-collared blouson, to the bareness of a black suit. One mottled

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