Shows

Rag & Bone Pre-Fall 2018

With new merchandise across categories dropping every month, designer Marcus Wainwright is focusing on perfecting the Rag & Bone icons. For pre-fall in women’s, “men’s wear for women” was key, like an Army green skirt with a zipper down the front or military-inspired jacket. Easygoing dresses with buttons running down the sides — offered in light purple or black-and-white houndstooth — added a more feminine touch to the looks. Denim was also strong in the collection, a standout being a long workwear robe.
The men’s wear was also a compilation of the brand’s greatest hits. T-shirts, chinos, tracksuits, jeans and outerwear with military and workwear influences were all tweaked for the season. Among the highlights was a waxed cotton field jacket, a coach’s jacket in a black-and-white gingham pattern, a color-blocked hoodie, and a patchwork oxford shirt that Wainwright said was a personal favorite. “I had one when I was 15 so I had to do it,” he said.
He said the brand’s mission is to “double down” on what it believes to be the “perfect” chinos, jeans, shirts, etc. “That’s at the core of what we do,” Wainwright said. For pre-fall, a new twill chino has entered the mix, and features a

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Jill Stuart Pre-Fall 2018

Due to demand from her buyers and showroom, Jill Stuart decided to debut her pre-fall collection for 2018. For her, it felt like a breath of fresh air to design for the in-between. “I was inspired by boyish tailoring, using classic men’s wear fabrics and making them more feminine by mixing in the bold, floral prints,” Stuart explained. From a red, black and cream check pant and matching blazer to a dark check blazer paired with blue tonal floral jacquard dress with ruffles, the overall look was great. Stuart also incorporated a few new dresses to the lineup: one with bold florals held a looser shape with shoulders off to the side and pouffed, while another in a creamy check had loose ties that could be worn around the neck to mimic a handkerchief. Heavier coats and leather offerings also nicely offset the feminine prints and ruffle details.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

R13 Pre-Fall 2018

There were a lot of covetable pieces in Chris Leba’s gritty Americana-inflected lineup. The Eighties and early Nineties typically manifest in different forms for the designer each season, this time leaning on a notion of edgy, reconstructed men’s wear.
On the side of grunge, red plaid fabric was worked in offbeat ways. An unstructured wool suit was cut oversize and with intentional crinkles. Flannels had inverted stitching. Wide-leg shorts featured a playful wrap-front kilt; even a fanny pack was attached to a similar pleated skirt. The latter was great for adding layers without the bulk.
Leaning more classic was outerwear inspired by men’s cuts. A dramatic sculpted leather jacket featured signature wide-set shoulders that looked as if the sleeves were being taken apart. A sharp blazer was cut with a practical shirt tail so it could be tucked in. Leba’s strength lies in tweaking what’s already luxe with some edge. Drawing from men’s wear also gives his woman a sense of cool rebellion.
With roots in denim, Leba is constantly pushing for innovation with the fabric, introducing a new straight-leg Cadillac jean with a novel back flare visible only from the side.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

M Missoni Pre-Fall 2018

The design team at M Missoni referenced Pop Art and cartoons through a Seventies lens for pre-fall, injecting the slightest bit of edge with sheer accents along the way. The inspiration manifested most evidently through abstract cartoon-inspired prints, like the evil-eye pattern on a knit dress mixed with signature zigzags, and bold geometric patterns in bright shades of pink and orange. The zigzags themselves came more muted this season, with blurred lines on a long-sleeve dress, or in collages on a sweater and vest that broke up the graphic lines.
The most referential of the era leaned on the side of preppy — as in the oversize printed polos, the sharp collars of knit tops and dresses and chunky knitwear. The latter brought in a sense of youthful energy and, along with mesh paneling, some allure in otherwise buttoned-up designs. Applied onto a fine knit dress, the result was a refreshing balance of proper and edgy.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Pringle of Scotland Pre-Fall 2018

Fran Stringer is sharpening her focus at Pringle of Scotland, staying true to the label’s heritage and to what it does best: knitwear. Stringer said she wanted to offer a modern take on the idea of colorful winter dressing and her bright, upbeat lineup was filled with loose, chunky knits in a palette of sorbet shades such as lavender, turquoise and heather.
Stringer said she was inspired by the richness of the pastel colors found in French Cubist artist Francois Villon’s work and by archival brand imagery from the Seventies and Eighties, which led to an array of cool, chunky-knit dresses, loose ponchos and cardigans layered over each other. A charming lilac twinset — a standout in the collection — featured a knitted A–line skirt and cardigan in the same shade. “It’s our interpretation of the modern twinset,” said the designer.
Outerwear played a key role with plenty of loosely tailored wrap coats and ponchos done in wool or seam-sealed cotton gabardine.
As she continues to develop her handwriting, Stringer also felt more confident to revisit the brand’s signature argyle pattern, which she previously treated with caution in order to avoid associations with golfing. Argyle patterns were patched onto cardigans, dialed up and hand-knitted

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Stella McCartney Men’s Spring 2018

For her third see-now-buy-now men’s collection, Stella McCartney took Ibiza as her muse, dressing her man in loose-fitting trousers and breezy knits, hippie fringes and parrot prints.
“It’s a celebration of summer with lightness and unexpected colors — and there’s a hippy-trippy side, too,” said the designer who whipped up a pastel lilac suit with loose, pooling trousers. Based on one of her father Paul McCartney’s suits it has a tighter fit with buttons that are set closer together.
Other standout pieces included a chunky cardigan with deep patch pockets and sun setting on the back, an oversize faux suede jacket with fringes, and lineup of boxy cotton shirts, some with the Stella McCartney logo, others done in fluorescent green and others still covered in parrots.
In keeping with her sustainability efforts, cashmere sweaters were made from recycled bits that would otherwise have ended up on the cutting room floor, while the fringed jacket was made from Alter Suede, which McCartney also uses for her women’s collections.
The collection wasn’t all sea, sand and Seventies sunsets, though. McCartney also drew inspiration from the artwork of Pater Sato, the Japanese airbrush artist. His bright colors and otherworldly ladies appeared on shirts or the linings of

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Dennis Basso Pre-Fall 2018

“The whole feeling is the modern siren…” Dennis Basso mused, “today the modern siren is wearing a fabulous fur over ripped jeans and a T-shirt. It’s a whole different world, a different interpretation.” For pre-fall 2018, the designer decided to run with this thought and give his bread and butter, furs and beautiful gowns, a new take. For instance, Basso designed smaller furs, meant to be worn during the daytime, like a blue fox boa or arctic marble fox jacket with pockets. Standouts included a men’s wear-inspired cashmere plaid coat with broadtail and fox-fur cuffs as well as a super cool, broadtail with mink mini coatdress with sheer arms and shoulder chains, paired with mink-toed leather boots.
A touch of mythology also flowed throughout à la koi fish, bird and floral motifs on red-carpet ballgowns and minidresses. The secret to success with the collection was in the details. Basso only used mini sequins to embellish, giving even the most lavish offerings, like a black hand-embroidered organza ballgown with corset, feather and embroidery details, a “low-key” but powerful look.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Christian Siriano Pre-Fall 2018

Christian Siriano’s mom played muse for the season, providing old scrapbook photos of herself in various Seventies fashion for her son to mine. One in particular stood out, where she’s wearing a leather jacket and jeans. It inspired a great capsule of supple leather and denim separates, the latter of which was a first for the designer. In true Siriano fashion, these were more refined and beautiful than your standard five-pocket jeans. A cropped denim moto style with oversize collar was a standout, trimmed with contrast stitching and an elongated belt. Hefty wide-leg leather pants also toed the line between casual and cocktail, easily imagined with a simple tank or formal blouse.
The dive into Seventies photographs led to Bianca and Mick Jagger, as well, an idea of retro glam but modern and chic. Elements of their style were seen in striped suiting, softly tailored blazers with silk ties, and sequined evening numbers. A gown with simple cami bodice and full metallic tulle skirt hand-embellished with painted glitter pieces was a knockout. It’s already received numerous requests for the upcoming awards season. Any of the pristine, elegant black and white gowns could be just as popular. If the range seemed a

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

A.L.C. Pre-Fall 2018

The wardrobe of the modern woman was on Andrea Lieberman’s mind for pre-fall. “She wears clothes that are quite real but it’s about how she styles it and carries herself with a balance of swagger and elegance.” At the intersection of those two qualities is comfort and confidence. Everything in Lieberman’s pre-fall collection could function in a practical woman’s day-to-day with ease, but nothing was too simple or ordinary. For example, a spare shirt with wide sleeves and pleated button-fly pants packed a vivid punch in monochromatic power red. Lieberman ramped up pajama dressing with a satin top and ultra-wide pants done in a floral print on a black base that gave the total look an elegant bite. On the more casual, cool side was a perfect vintage-inspired golden-yellow T-shirt printed with “La Californie,” after Picasso’s villa in Cannes, worn with slouchy, wide-leg pants.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Badgley Mischka Pre-Fall 2018

Mark Badgley and James Mischka’s pre-fall lineup was like a key to the classic late-summer, early fall social calendar of the all-American socialite. From an overarching palette of red, white and blue, they designed sporty casualwear inspired by Claire McCardell, such as a plaid, spongy cotton top paired with a striped pencil skirt and a red-and-white, cabana striped cotton blazer over navy skinny pants. “It’s a little bit Labor Day because that’s when she’s shopping for this delivery,” said Badgley. To kick off the social season, there were striking, statuesque column gowns with open, off-the shoulder necklines and a few well-chosen embellishments around the shoulders fit for a latter-day Truman Capote swan.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Edeline Lee Pre-Fall 2018

London-based designer Edeline Lee presented in New York for the first time at the Neue Galerie. Her pre-fall collection drew from objects in the gallery’s current exhibition “Wiener Werkstatte 1903 to 1932: The Luxury of Beauty,” the first comprehensive retrospective in America devoted to the Vienna Workshops.
Set in a tone of ladylike polish, the looks held more abstract influences from the artists than direct ones. A sleek black dress, for instance, was trimmed with ruffle flounces referencing fish tails on a Carl Otto Czeschka box; the squares of low-hanging ribbon ties of a shirt to a Hoffmann beer glass; and the bell sleeves of a prim green dress to a Philip Hausler table lamp. The only overt reference was an Egyptian eye motif by Klimt on the hem of a retro shift dress and skirt.
Without knowing the artistic references, the takeaway was quirky decorative elements that livened up minimal silhouettes. The epaulets on a black top provided structure with restraint, as did the architecturally pinned sleeves of a soft red dress. “It’s not always easily visible, but what I did was take a modernist form,” Lee said. “There’s an element of control.”

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Kimora Lee Simmons Pre-Fall 2018

Come the time when pre-fall drops, Kimora Lee Simmons is busy getting her kids ready for the year ahead. The nostalgia for back-to-school shopping led Simmons to the inspiration for her latest collection, “Back to School, for Adults.”
Simmons focused on her classics, blouses with wide or ruffled sleeves, wrap or fit-and-flare dresses; this time infusing men’s wear and ath-leisure details. A selection of sleeveless dresses incorporated outer shoulder-pad or a selection of black-and-white men’s wear check silhouettes stood out in the collection. Simmons also mixed in a bit of gym class to the lineup. For instance, a school uniform-esque, blue and black watercolor plaid skirt with athletic stripe band paired with a black V-neck top or bomber blouse. Nodding to school mascots, a multicolored “wildcat” and “tiger” print took the trip down memory lane a step too far. A selection of graphic, black-and-white color-blocked pieces added a polished look to the collection.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Gucci Pre-Fall 2018

Abundance seems to be a key word to describe Alessandro Michele’s era at Gucci.
Incredible sales, outstanding brand popularity, extensive collections and hyper-decorativism are definitely some of the elements that are marking the rebirth of the label.
Once again, Michele approached the pre-fall season — which is usually dedicated to safer, more commercial collections — with the same flamboyant, opulent, quite extreme attitude that defines his runway shows.
The brand presented a big lineup of 82 looks, which were shot by photographer Peter Schlesinger in different Roman locations, including the aula magna of the Dental Hospital George Eastman and the Hotel Mediterraneo, all previously used by Dario Argento for his horror movies.
Michele’s signature cinematic approach highlighted the quintessential eclecticism of the collection, which, while touching many different notes, was still so coherent and cohesive.
The Roman designer easily shifted from bourgeois bon ton to hip street glam. His nonsense grammar rules actually enabled him to build his own language, which is not only spoken within his reign but is actually becoming an international fashion idiom.
Clothes-wise, the lineup was extremely inclusive. Windbreakers, separates splashed with the Flora pattern, embroidered oversize college cardigans, bold tracksuits, as well as an array of jackets and skirts coming in

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Koché Pre-Fall 2018

It’s been a quiet pre-fall season in New York — some might say quiet altogether in New York, fashion-wise at least. Seeing the perceived lull as an opportunity to create a little more noise for her buzzy, Paris-based label Koché, Christelle Kocher brought her pre-fall collection to Manhattan. She staged one of the pre-fall season’s only proper shows, and the first fashion show at the historic independent bookstore The Strand.
“In Paris, you have history and here you have more energy and dynamism,” said Kocher of New York. “It was also a really good message for me to come here. So many brands have not been showing in New York and for me it’s always so inspiring.”
The move was savvy for a small brand focusing on the U.S. market. Kocher got a strong turnout of big industry locals and some members of the public who found out about the show through Koché’s social channels. However, the collection wasn’t quite as strong as the show’s strategy.
A street casting yielded a diverse group of co-ed models, all of whom shared a personal style that’s often described as “edgy” and “downtown,” two stylistic concepts reflected in the clothes. Logo tracksuits in sporty graphic prints

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Caroline Constas Pre-Fall 2018

Last September, after all the NYFW madness, Caroline Constas traveled to Buenos Aires to design her latest collection. While there, Constas found inspiration from the neighborhood La Boca, which had beautifully color-blocked walls throughout the town. When it comes to creating a transition season collection, Constas tends to look at it from a business perspective: what has been really strong for her brand? For pre-fall, that meant serving the demand for both high summer as well as more, buy-now-wear-now, early fall pieces in a palette derived from her travels.
The combination of a lively, colorful palette, in graphic shapes and floral prints in updated, strategic silhouettes served Constas well. For instance, the evolution of her Bardot dress, with a more tailored, less flouncy look for pre-fall, offered in white with multifloral print. A calla lily print, polka dots and stripes were abundant on smocked blouses, charmeuse slips and robes, and ruffled separates. Noting that evening was still an expanding category, Constas added tailoring to the collection a la a graphic, black-and-white blazer minidress. A sleek, black with white polka dot, off-the-shoulder dress with buttons down the sides and along the cuffs also made for a nice addition to Constas’ offering

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Max Mara Pre-Fall 2018

Max Mara’s pre-fall collection was an example of why fans of the house return to it — a meditation on one of its classic, impeccably tailored cashmere coats, specifically the 101801. Guided loosely by the Japanese design principles of modernity and tradition — Yasuhiro Ishimoto’s photographs of the Katsura Imperial Villa were a reference — the design team expanded the traditional double-breasted, kimono-sleeved 101801 into a trapeze coat, lean belted styles and a peacoat. Monochromatic looks — shown in navy, camel and ivory — were built out of spare crepe dresses and jumpsuits with elegant, utilitarian lines, cashmere tailored separates, and romantic yet citified maxis decorated with vertical ruffles. The brand’s classic monogram, revived on the spring runway, was used with subtlety on tonal prints. Styled with beanies, gloves, ankle socks and flat oxfords, the look was serious chic. The lineup offered much in the way of timeless wardrobe staples, and the coats in particular will never go out of style. Buy one and wear it forever, but you’ll always want more.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Sonia Rykiel Pre-Fall 2018

With preparations under way for the house’s 50th-anniversary celebrations in 2018, Sonia Rykiel’s women’s lib roots were alive and well in this covetable “wild and free”-themed wardrobe combining function, form and fun.
“It’s about the pieces, the way she wears them, the attitude,” said Julie de Libran, showing how a fluid tailored men’s jacket in an aged-blue dégradé check tucks into a cargo pant to create a new jumpsuit. Or how a matching leather T-shirt and skirt in “streets-of-Saint-Germain” gray — also in a signature, snug, satin-backed crepe version — forms a dress silhouette when cinched with a belt.
Leather minis and a trans-seasonal mink blouson with removable black leather sleeves sported utilitarian snapper closures, while a new spin on the house’s iconic lip print on a green and blue skirt and top in a Lurex knit created the illusion of a leopard print from afar.
Highlights included a patchwork mini (another twist on the Rykiel stripe); a checked duffel with urban leather patches and a lightweight bonded jersey lining, and a young-at-heart, Sixties-flavored, two-tone indigo-blue corduroy dress coat that can be worn with pants or just a pair of boots, depending on the mood. The navy jacquard fil coupé dress coat edged

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Amanda Wakeley Pre-Fall 2018

Amanda Wakeley had an urbanite in mind, but one who’s not too fussy and who likes a fluid shape and a punchy bright here and there.
The designer described her woman’s taste as “gloriously eclectic,” and said her vision was to mix old and new, vintage and modern, masculine and feminine.
She paired an emerald oversize ribbed sweater with fluid dark green trousers, and slipped a herringbone boyfriend blazer with a laid-back feel over taupe tuxedo-style flares.
A long cashmere ribbed cardigan gave a dark green printed crepe de chine slip dress a blast of warmth while mannish tailored coats in tweed or plaid were paired with black cashmere track suit bottoms or wide-leg satin trousers.
Fur played its part, too, in the form of a leopard-printed coat and deep green fox scarf and a lineup of shearling gilets and jackets some of them layered over sexy, deep V-neck knits.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Kobi Halperin Pre-Fall 2018

With the approach of a three-year anniversary, Kobi Halperin was feeling a sense of nostalgia — for his homeland, Israel, and for his namesake line’s founding principles. The designer is focused on timeless design with signature embroidery; he’s never felt inclined to splash his name or a logo across his designs, opting to let the craftsmanship speak for itself. It’s a traditional practice of the Bedouin people in the Israeli desert, as well, who have created a cultural identity for themselves with tonal black-on-black embroidery on robes. Halperin was drawn to the parallel use of thread work in creating identity, along with the strong visual imagery the desert implies.
His pre-fall collection came in a muted palette culled from the desert, along with a capsule of leopard prints. “I’m passionate about movement,” Halperin said. “This is the most elegant animal that exists.” His lineup was all about softness, motion and comfort. Nowhere was that more apparent than a jumpsuit cut with harem pants. Long tunics and printed silk pajama sets hammered home a notion of ease. Halperin’s signature embroidery came in a variety of applications — “x” contrast stitching on featherweight blouses and maxidresses; subtle tonal embroidery on a bright orange

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

J.Mendel Pre-Fall 2018 Review

“She’s kind of a nomad…a Polish, bohemian nomad,” designer Gilles Mendel spoke of Talitha Getty, the muse to his latest collection. While the iconic, free-spirit inspired the feel of his pre-fall collection, the color palette was prompted by Mark Rothko’s signature “Multiforms” works. “Coming here, to me, is like coming to the dressing room of the chicest girl in town,” Mendel mused. Inspired by the late Sixties and early Seventies, the collection looked glamorous and modern in Mendel’s DNA: pleated tulle overlay gowns, embroidered skirts and dresses and ruffled blouses.
Mendel enjoyed mixing unusual color combinations, plum with burnt orange, with his luxe and refined silhouettes. His best looks came in burnt velvet — a texture “so rich, that whatever you wear, you feel refined,” Mendel noted, like a vintage rose dress top with Seventies flared trousers or a floor-length gold gown with bishop sleeves. Luxurious, unfinished and reversible furs added to the beautiful and lavish feel of the collection. Overall, the contrast of Rothko’s work against a modern, bohemian spirit suited Mendel.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Sportmax Pre-Fall 2018

An energetic vibe was injected into Sportmax’s pre-fall collection, which was inspired by the world of sports. High-tech materials and details were incorporated into the pieces, which exuded a sense of urban dynamism.
Comfortable ease was infused in a maxi cashmere cape embellished with nylon inserts, which was layered over a lightweight technical parka, while feminine jersey dresses featured ergonomic stitching and contrasting panels inspired by surf wet suits.
Roomy sweatshirts revealed nylon inserts and chunky zippers, and knitted sweaters showed deconstructed silhouettes.
Wide-leg pants and oversize jackets punctuated by contrasting stitches were crafted from dark indigo denim. For a more eye-catching look, jacquard dresses were covered with transparent sequins for a shiny effect.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more