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Maggie Marilyn Resort 2018

Having only graduated a year-and-a-half ago from university, New Zealand-based designer Maggie (Marilyn) Hewitt has an impressive four seasons (including resort 2018) under her belt with a global business that is growing quite quickly. “We are now in 30 stockists and 70 doors globally; we picked up some amazing new stockists last season which are dropping into stores in July,” Hewitt noted. Resort 2018 included a collection of easily worn and washable pieces that she designed for prior collections, noting that as a young brand, it’s important to create a feeling and mood that can become identifiable.
The Maggie Marilyn brand prides itself on being ethically conscious. Playing into this, Hewitt revealed that the brand recently changed to a two drop system — she will be showing both spring and resort during her resort appointments, with fall and pre-fall during her pre-fall appointments. “Carrying on from our ethically conscious ethos, not only is it important to think about the make and supply chain but to also look after my team as a whole, and me as a designer…having enough time to actually come up with newness, not under this crazy treadmill of turning our new collections every three months,” Hewitt explained.

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Faith Connexion Men’s Spring 2018

For its fourth collection since the brand was reintroduced in 2014 with a group of former Balmain designers, Faith Connexion continued its collective take, including unique items by the likes of experimental artist Austin Blaisdell. He told WWD: “I take what I love and put it together, and eventually I have a finished product.”
His deconstruction-reconstruction technique resulted, for instance, in pieces decorated with his own hand-scrawled graffiti and colors faded on a rooftop under the Los Angeles sun.
Fashion designer Stefan Cooke also lent his craft to Faith Connexion this season, with trompe l’oeil pieces. Case in point: What seemed like a pair of denim jeans was actually a digitally manipulated image of a pair jeans transposed on to elastic.
The brand Faith Connexion carried over its tie-ins with Kappa and K-Way for its growing sportier and streetwear elements. The spring line is almost like a concept store unto itself, with an intriguing twist on casual luxury and its offer spanning an array of fashions items, from oversized jerseys to a silver-slick Seventies tailored jacket and on-trend camo tracksuit pants.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Hermès Men’s Spring 2018: Véronique Nichanian jumped on the streetwear bandwagon with shiny track pants, oversized hoodies

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Kenzo Men’s Spring 2018

Carol Lim and Humberto Leon set out to capture the duality of two Japanese house muses past and present: Composer, activist and dancer Ryuichi Sakamoto, who the designers in their show notes credited with being “one of the people who sparks a myriad of ideas in everything we do.” And the other, Sayoko Yamaguchi, a true chameleon billed as one of the world’s original supermodels, and muse to Kenzo Takada.
The men’s section was inspired by Sakamoto’s sense of individualism, opening with a series of ultra sharp single-breasted three-button suits with embellished multiple ticket pockets and chain accents. But the designs sporting cartoonish graphics won out, recalling computer games and motor racing. They had an old-school raver flavor, with album cover T-shirts and prints supplied by the man himself.
Things took a turn for the eccentric with the softly constructed suits with roomy whirled sleeves in shades including deep purple, and the clown numbers in paisleys and micro florals. The textured colored knits, including a Rising Sun design, were great.
Channeling Yamaguchi’s unique way of clashing patterns, prints, silhouettes and colors, meanwhile, the punkish pop aesthetic of the women’s collection was fun, especially the optical effects on looks mixing stripes, though the designers

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Études Men’s Spring 2018

The design team toned down the exaggerated volumes of past seasons, and what a relief it was. Gone were the comic proportions of fall, and in their place some fresh and flattering looks that were an ode to Paris in the Eighties.
There was a strong workwear feel, with men and women alike dressed in black or white overalls, their pockets adorned with little green ribbon tabs resembling Metro tickets. Cropped trousers were worn with stretchy belts that read “Paris, Ville de Nos Rêves,” while striped shirts were emblazoned with the letters P-A-R-I-S, lyrics from a song by the French New Wave group Taxi Girl.
White denim jackets and corset tops came with patches of the Eiffel Tower, a Mona Lisa cartoon and other touristy bits, while another patch reading “Vertige,” or vertigo, was a nod to the dizziness of young love in the City of Light. (No fear of clichés on this runway).
The colors of the Metro also came through in a green and white striped shorts suit that opened the show and a bright yellow suit with Vertige emblazoned across the back. A boxy gray suit and oversized trenches took their swagger straight from the Eighties.
Among the highlights were long shirts with midnight blue

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Hed Mayner Men’s Spring 2018

Pushing boundaries in his approach to silhouettes and constructions, Hed Mayner confirmed his status as one to watch. His one-button, double-breasted jacket was very on trend.
There was a romantic, drapey feel to the cropped and elongated coats with voluminous folds at the front, one of which was crafted from what looked like reworked military tents.
There has been a strong globalization trend this season, and he’s part of the movement. East-meets-West references abounded, including judo pants and kimono closures on shirts, with a tonal palette hooked on beige, chocolate and light gray.
The designer created tension through plays on expansion and tightness in certain silhouettes, such as a look layering a sleeveless white crop top over a boxy elongated blazer.
Bi-fabric jeans with black and white paneling at the back, a translucent white windbreaker with rope details, and a poncho with fringing were also covetable pieces in a collection rich in ideas.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Hermès Men’s Spring 2018: Véronique Nichanian jumped on the streetwear bandwagon with shiny track pants, oversized hoodies and parkas in technical fabrics.
Balmain Men’s Spring 2018: Olivier Rousteing took his bow in a deep-V Breton wrap sweater, and worked many of those French standards into his typically

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Hermès Men’s Spring 2018

Streetwear has steamrolled through the men’s luxury landscape in recent seasons, as epitomized by the collaboration between Louis Vuitton and Supreme. When the purveyor of the world’s most expensive handbags hops on board, you know there’s no turning back.
Watching the Hermès men’s show on Saturday night felt like a watershed moment: Here was the ultimate bastion of French elegance showing shiny track pants, oversized hoodies and parkas in technical fabrics.
Véronique Nichanian, who has designed the label’s men’s wear since 1988, periodically swings between old-school luxury and a more youthful take on house codes. This season proved that even she is not immune to the siren call of the street.
Mixed in among the lambskin and cashmere was a patented fabric called Toilbright, which had the glossy sheen of a foil candy wrapper. It came in colors ranging from red to apple green, cinnamon, royal blue and black.
Nichanian used it on statement items like baggy black track pants, or a burgundy-and-turquoise parka. She layered hooded and zippered tops under suit jackets, in what is emerging as a key trend for spring.
White top-stitching was used as a graphic element on items including baggy blue work wear-inspired pants and a hooded shirt in denim-colored

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Kolor Men’s Spring 2018

It’s an old classic in terms of themes, but the tongue-in-cheek delivery gave it a new spin. Junichi Abe channeled the “flavor” of preppy, Ivy League dressing in Kolor’s fun, mercy-friendly collection.
The takeaways included a navy blazer with gold buttons and a gold Tokyo-themed embroidered badge, a cute duffel overhauled in a crispy light nylon overdyed orange and tennis sweaters with an oversized letter K slapped at the neckline.
Abe also subverted the theme through cuts and fabric effects like the T-shirts that looked as though they were made from jersey but had a stiff papery touch, and sweatshirts with boomerang sleeves that created a round volume.
Accessories included penny loafers revisited as a slipper with a utilitarian strap at the heel and light versions of regimental striped silk ties designed to wrap around the neck.

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Editions M.R Men’s Spring 2018

For Editions M.R’s spring collection, Mathieu de Ménonville had in mind a safari theme, but with an urban twist while keeping in mind some drawings inspired by a French tapestry and 19th-century toile de jouy wallpaper, reinterpreted.
Camel-colored pieces thread their way through the line, which had a wide selection of trouser shapes, including a carrot cut, a riff on the jodhpur style and pants with edges left raw. This was all in keeping with the label’s trademark nonchalant, tailored silhouettes, including high-waisted pants with front pleats, fluid jackets and a striped long coat taking the form of a belted bathrobe.
Editions M.R sets out to be a lifestyle brand, and succeeds. For spring it offered looks for most every occasion, including shorts, T-shirts and a well-tailored suit. Colors ran the gamut from light browns to beige and burnt orange.
The label is sold in about 80 doors, and while Japan and Korea have been its bestselling markets, Editions M.R has been gaining traction in Anglophone countries, according to de Ménonville.
He also said the brand’s other co-founder, Rémi de Laquintane, has left the company.

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Comme des Garcons Shirt Men’s Spring 2018

Full of dots, patchwork and pastel colors, this collection was like a bright fashion rainbow arching across Place Vendome. Easy and upbeat with interesting stitching and surfaces, the collection featured a mix of tailoring and spiffed-up streetwear in a palette of Easter egg pastels and primary colors.
Roomy lilac shorts came with a white shirt that had a dripping red dot pattern (courtesy of the American artist Mary Heilmann) while summery jackets were made from a jaunty patchwork of blue and white stripes and checks.
Rei Kawakubo also worked to elevate the classics: Hoodies were long and elegant with a trapeze shape, white button-front shirts came with haphazardly paneled sleeves or tone-on-tone patches at the front. Tailored denim jackets and trousers with exposed seams looked as if they’d been stitched together from different bits of fabric.
Shirts had split personalities, with different color backs and fronts in combinations such as pink and aqua, or mint and lilac. The two sides were stitched together roughly across the neck and shoulders like something Frankenstein’s tailor might have whipped up.
Kawakubo treated cardigans and pullovers in a similar manner, although the seams on the two-tone sweaters were more polished, and less monster-like.

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Heron Preston Men’s Spring 2018

For the second showing in Paris of Heron Preston, designer Heron Johnson drew a cool crowd, including fellow designer Marcelo Burlon and the Afterhomework crew – its stylist Elena Mottola met Johnson over Instagram and did the styling of the presentation – to the gallery space he turned into his “Show House.”
The previous evening, he was holding the Paris leg of his retail tour at Colette. The de riguer tour tee sold out long before the event had concluded. “In London, I’ve actually timed it and [they sold] one per minute,” he said.
All eyes were on Bella Hadid. It wasn’t hard: she was decked in a high-visibility orange cropped denim jacket and matching leather mini-skirt from Preston’s newly unveiled women’s line of 50 pieces, premiering in Paris. A mini-purse and oversize tote bag, developed with Off-White, competed for attention.
“[The vivid orange and bright yellow] makes me feel good: it goes back to safety,” he said, flipping through racks of bracing color. New this season were hiking pants in white, a PVC rain jacket with the white heron Audubon, a denim jacket with a hood cut from parachute nylon, and a black shirt with reflective details, inspired by a shirt donated to

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