Shows

Michael Kors RTW Pre-Fall 2018

“I liked the dichotomy this season of romantic and charming elements mixed with sleek tailoring,” says Michael Kors. “It’s a mix of femininity, polish and athleticism. To me it is the perfect storm for how women want to dress today. The collection is inherently about modern eclecticism.”

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Sandro RTW Fall 2018

What do you get when you try to combine Parisian cool-girl attitude with British nonchalance and Americana-loving irony in the hands of a trend-synthesizing contemporary player like Sandro? A fall collection rife with mismatched jolie laide layers that hit the bull’s-eye of fashion’s current obsession with streetwear gritty/glam. It was a mishmash of statement outerwear — faux furs, tailored plaids, workwear denim and short puffers — layered over sweatshirts, trackpants, long skirts, cropped and distressed denim and dorky socks and trainers. Topping things off were sweatshirts and giant scarves printed with broadly positive, feminist messaging (“Women;” “Love”).

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Digawel RTW Fall 2018

Name: Digawel
Main message: One of the winners of the 2018 Tokyo Fashion Award, Kohei Nishimura has been quietly building a fan base for his designs for over a decade, and participated in Tokyo Fashion Week for the first time this season. While he designs for both men and women, his pieces have a unisex quality. He used suiting fabrics for relaxed and casual trousers, pullovers and anoraks, while turning out easy suits from softer fabrics such as velour. Cozy, long sweaters and long scarves rounded out the offering.
The result: Nishimura proved himself to be deserving of his award with a tight, collection of easy pieces that mix and match together across colors, textures and genders.

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Wewill Men’s Fall 2018

Name: Wewill
Main message: A year after launching his brand, Hidetaka Fukuzono staged his first runway show in an underground nightclub, with the models walking through narrow corridors and square rooms. It was a collection heavy on outerwear, with a variety of coats in wool tweed, shearling, nylon, leather and more. Fukuzono employed unconventional layering, showing denim jackets under bombers or plush jackets, and pajamas under suit jackets or robe-like coats.
The result: While there wasn’t much originality in the shapes, Fukuzono added interest with his mix of rich, contrasting textures, resulting in slightly elevated basics that were casual and comfortable.

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Soe RTW Fall 2018

Name: Soe
Main message: This brand’s collections always incorporate a certain preppy element, and the designers’ fall offering was no exception. Soichiro Ito and Yuki Takagi imagined a new, modern collegiate style that reinterpreted classic coats, checked scarves, pleated skirts and crested sweaters. Their silhouettes were oversize, with shirts untucked and sleeves cut extra long. A print of a crowd at a sporting event, combined with a partial McDonald’s logo, appeared on a skirt, a pullover and the bottom of a long coat, adding a touch of subtle whimsy.
The result: The designers showed their expertise at reinventing classic pieces for the current market, incorporating influences from the past while making the overall result feel very now.

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Sise Men’s Fall 2018

Name: Sise
Main message: Seishin Matsui went for a mix of cool and preppy, with biker jackets and long coats sharing the runway with cuffed jeans and button-downs worn under sweatshirts. Athletic influences were plentiful, with slim track pants, relaxed joggers, Windbreakers and loose-fitting shorts — some with legs of uneven lengths — making multiple appearances. While the majority of the collection was turned out in black, white or deep shades of green and burgundy, a few looks in the middle had an almost summery feel in pastels or yellow and blue checks.
The result: While the silhouettes consisted of classic shapes and Matsui didn’t do much to put his own spin on them, it was a solid showing from a brand that hasn’t staged a runway show in over four years.

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Mint Designs RTW Fall 2018

Name: Mint Designs
Main message: Held in Tokyo’s Fred Perry store and serving a dual purpose as the launch of the two brands’ latest collaboration, this show had models descending dramatically down three flights of stairs while wearing patent leather boots with stilettos so high they could barely walk. Impractical footwear aside, Hokuto Katsui and Nao Yagi’s collection consisted of loose, comfortable dresses, skirts, pullovers and blouses in mixed prints and solid shades of pale aqua, red, green, yellow, purple, camel and gray. A coat that looked like it had been turned inside out, with its puffy, newspaper print lining on the outside was a standout piece.
The result: The designers are adept at mixing colors, prints and textures, and at making easy-fitting pieces look chic and stylish. While not as playful as some of their past collections, it was a solid, cohesive offering.

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Mistergentleman Men’s Fall 2018

After a two-year hiatus, Takeshi Osumi and Yuichi Yoshii returned to Tokyo’s fashion week with an effortlessly cool offering that mixed dandy with outdoorsy and streetwear with tailoring. A teal blue velour suit was worn with a funnel-neck shirt and sneakers, while a plush fleece pullover topped slick patent pants in pale pink.
In what was perhaps an acknowledgement of the fact that they already have some female customers, the designers also played with traditional gender norms, sending one woman down the runway and incorporating details normally only seen in women’s collections. Shirts and a trenchcoat that seemed relatively pedestrian from the front — aside from the fact that they had no openings — were shown to be completely backless. And card holder-sized patent leather pouches were worn as tiny, colorful cross-body bags.
Osumi and Yoshii, who style their collections themselves, are known for their clever layering, but this time they often did it in a single piece. Puffer jackets had a second, cropped layer on top, while cargo pocket arm bands and half vests were attached to sweatshirts and coats. Some suit jackets and down coats had exaggerated kangaroo pockets at the front.
In a season that has been lacking in strong men’s brands —

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Hyke RTW Fall 2018

Many Tokyo brands have become known for their bright colors, extreme detailing and outlandish designs. Hyke isn’t one of them. Designed by the duo of Yukiko Ode and Hideaki Yoshihara, it specializes in meticulously constructed basics with subtle modern twists, created from some of the best textiles available.
This season Ode and Yoshihara chose to reimagine classic military styles, with a particular focus on outerwear. They updated bomber jackets in oversized shapes, with fur trim or in shearling turned inside out to show the fluffy ivory fleece. But the real stars of the collection were the gorgeous coats. From the most luxurious-looking melton wool were crafted peacoats, toggle coats, double-breasted coats and belted coats. The silhouettes were oversized, with sleeves in particular often extralong and puffy.
Worn under the outerwear were slim leather pants bunched at the ankles, pleated skirts with overlays in suiting fabric, houndstooth suit jackets, thigh-high shearling leggings, rib knit tunics and simple sleeveless dresses slit up to the navel in front. Everything was done in shades of navy, gray, olive, khaki and ivory, save for two bright orange puffy jackets, which resembled flight jackets turned inside out.
Hyke also showed items from its second season collaborating with The North

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Muze RTW Fall 2018

Name: Muze
Main message: Following in the footsteps of designers such as Jeremy Scott and Vetements, Masatoshi Ishida and Hiroshi Shibahara made an attempt to mix the commercial with the creative by splashing the logo of a non-fashion company across their clothes. They chose Calorie Mate, a brand of energy bars and gel drinks that is a mainstay in nearly every Japanese convenience store. The logo appeared on the sleeves of a moto jacket, across the bottom of a shirt, and on hoodies, jackets, asymmetric hemmed skirts and dresses. They also showed more simple, outdoorsy pieces in solid colors, such as a turquoise blue windbreaker and black or cream jackets in a combination of nylon and plush fabrics.
The result: The Calorie Mate pieces didn’t always hit the right tone of irony and many looked like simple advertisements, but they at least were more interesting than the rest of the collection.

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Paradox Tokyo RTW Fall 2018

Name: Paradox Tokyo
Main message: Rie Tobita followed the trend of creating hard-edged streetwear with sporty influences, turning out voluminous puffer jackets closed with plastic buckles, graphic T-shirts, hooded sweatshirts, nylon windbreakers and fleece sweatpants. While much of the collection was done in black, the darkness was punctuated by pops of bright orange, deep purple, royal blue, baby pink and a black-and-white graffiti print.
The result: While it may have reflected actual trends in street fashion, the collection had little originality and gave customers no real reason to buy the pieces from Paradox rather than one of the many other brands producing similar styles.

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G.V.G.V. RTW Fall 2018

Name: G.V.G.V.
Main message: The designer who goes by the name Mug showed a psychedelic offering of relaxed wide-leg pants, sweatshirts and track jackets together with more polished shifts and shirtdresses. All were turned out in a mix of groovy prints including checkerboards, wavy stripes, zigzags, Seventies florals and polka dots, punctuated with solid shades of burnt orange, wine red, olive, khaki and purple. Accessories included thigh-high boots, fanny packs and drawstring handbags. Despite the energy of the show, it was a disappointing use of the roller rink venue, with not a single pair of skates in sight.
The result: The collection was fun and cohesive, if not particularly risky, and despite the retro theme, casual styling brought it firmly into the present.

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TTT_MSW RTW Fall 2018

Name: TTT_MSW
Main message: With his brand’s first runway show, 24-year-old designer Shota Tamada brought something that is often lacking from Tokyo fashion week: a youthful energy. Supported by Amazon Fashion’s At Tokyo program, the show re-created a car crash scene, complete with dead grass and leaves, a broken-down car and an artificial rainstorm in the center of the circular runway. Tamada said his theme for the season was “mafia,” and his motley crew of gang members emerged from the backseat of the car before walking the runway in a mix of cargo pants, faux fur coats, velour track jackets, suits, satin shirts and leather-like bomber jackets.
The result: Tamada’s collection lacked originality in terms of design and silhouettes, but employed an interesting use of color and, at times, texture.

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Tory Sport Fall 2018

Tory Burch focused much of her fall Tory Sport collection on the off-duty moments of life, whether going to and from the gym or the field, to travel to the weekend. “We spent so much time thinking about the seamlessness of someone’s life,” Burch said during a preview. “How do we design things that aren’t so obviously sport but are superfunctional and have the properties an athlete needs, but is also how I’m dressing and others are dressing on the weekend.” That meant a big focus on outerwear with down puffers and parkas in oversize and small and proportions. Some of the coats had positive messaging — “Get to the gym” — sewn into the linings. Running gear came in graphic multicolored checks. Tracksuits were elevated enough to wear to the office and comfortable enough for a warm-up. There were chunky hand-knit ski sweaters, seamless sports bras and leggings, Coolmax cashmere sweatpants and a wrap skirt to make one’s ath-leisurewear a little less dressed-down. There’s a new performance sock sneaker, and Burch continues to up the ante on her golf and tennis gear, infusing the fabrics with sun protection. As of the fall deliveries, Tory Sport will be sold directly

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J Brand RTW Fall 2018

J Brand’s fall lineup was divided into three categories: Super Evening, Super Fashion and Super Color. All of it was super Nineties, putting it super on trend. There were sheer organza “jean” jacket tops and blazers and organza details on jeans, an oversize crushed velvet jacket and pants, and a minimalist ribbed cashmere slipdress. As for the actual jeans, they came high-waisted and skinny with button flies and pockets, in holographic silver and a style that zipped up the front of the leg from ankle to waist. To play up the brand’s Los Angeles roots, the look book was shot at Chateau Marmont on Jacquelyn Jablonski, styled with combat boots to emphasize the Nineties-ness of it all.

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Heaven Tanudiredja RTW Fall 2018

Name: Heaven Tanudiredja
Main message: Indonesian designer Heaven Tanudiredja is known for his sculptural accessories, which have appeared on the runways of Christian Dior, Dries Van Noten, Iris van Herpen and Juun. J. In his first runway show in Tokyo he presented a series of lavishly embellished coats, dresses and sheer blouses in a variety of contrasting textures. He used a plastic-like material with all-over circular cut-outs to create long skirts and trapeze dresses, sent out sequined fishnet capes, and topped his delicate chiffon dresses with stiff cotton boleros.
The result: While the detailing, which included embroidery, rhinestones, feathers and sequins, was beautifully done, many of the more elaborate pieces went a bit too far, making them unrealistic for most consumers.

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Yohei Ohno RTW Fall 2018

“Shows are fun to watch, but they really have nothing to do with us. This time I wanted to do something that would put [the audience] into the daily lives of other people,” designer Yohei Ohno said after his fall presentation.
Held in an underground space in Tokyo’s Omotesando district, the installation had models posing in natural positions among retro furniture and a mirrored background. While the clothes had Ohno’s typically sculptural shapes, they were also more wearable than his previous offerings, even though he said that wasn’t his intention.
“Until now I’ve used weird materials such as metallics as my signature, but I decided to stop doing that for now and instead use fabrics that are more intimate for people, such as corduroy and tweed,” he said. “I started with these kinds of fabrics that give people an intimate feeling and then expanded them using my own mental image.”
Ohno showed tweed suits with exaggerated puff shoulders, raw denim jackets and high-waisted jeans, shirts with tulle overlays on the sleeves, and tank tops with long, pleated panels hanging off the front and gathered together like curtains. Bodysuits made many appearances in a variety of fabrics, and were worn either layered over the

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Yohei Ohno RTW Fall 2018

“Shows are fun to watch, but they really have nothing to do with us. This time I wanted to do something that would put [the audience] into the daily lives of other people,” designer Yohei Ohno said after his fall presentation.
Held in an underground space in Tokyo’s Omotesando district, the installation had models posing in natural positions among retro furniture and a mirrored background. While the clothes had Ohno’s typically sculptural shapes, they were also more wearable than his previous offerings, even though he said that wasn’t his intention.
“Until now I’ve used weird materials such as metallics as my signature, but I decided to stop doing that for now and instead use fabrics that are more intimate for people, such as corduroy and tweed,” he said. “I started with these kinds of fabrics that give people an intimate feeling and then expanded them using my own mental image.”
Ohno showed tweed suits with exaggerated puff shoulders, raw denim jackets and high-waisted jeans, shirts with tulle overlays on the sleeves, and tank tops with long, pleated panels hanging off the front and gathered together like curtains. Bodysuits made many appearances in a variety of fabrics, and were worn either layered over the

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Enhance RTW Fall 2018

Name: Enhance
Main message: Masakazu Takeguchi doesn’t take many risks with his collections, but what he does, he does well. His rock-inspired suits, dresses and slim jeans have definite commercial value, even if many of them feel too simple for the runway. To add his own touch to basics, he decorated black suits with tonal embroidery, left raw hems on jackets, placed long zippers up the front of trousers, and cut dramatic slanted hems into skirts. Many looks were accessorized with scarves made of rosettes, which were also used to fashion a long denim skirt, a standout piece.
The result: A veteran of the Japanese fashion business who has worked on several brands, Takeguchi has proven he can make clothes. Now it would be nice to see him experiment a bit more.

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Akiko Aoki RTW Fall 2018

In the four short years since launching, Akiko Aoki has quickly become one of the most talked-about brands on the Tokyo fashion week calendar. So when she chose to stage her fall show in a tiny underground space, the city’s top editors clamored for one of the few seats. The setup seemed a bit strange at first, with the audience seated on one side of the room facing a wall of mirrors, in front of which were five sets of white pipes, a shoehorn at the base of each, and in the middle, a single pair of oxfords.
But the props hinted at what was to come, as did the two men dressed in black suits and white gloves who wheeled out racks of clothing, which they transferred to the pipes. Aoki blurred the lines between the runway and backstage by having her models change into the different looks right in front of the audience. It was an unusual choice that worked well for the collection, emphasizing the versatility of the men’s wear-inspired shirts and dresses.
The models came out first in shirts or shirtdresses, which were then tucked into pants or layered under a jacket with long, asymmetric panels. Suiting and

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