Shows

Nicopanda RTW Fall 2018

Nicola Formichetti isn’t a sneaker designer but his skill lies not only in his social media fluency but his ability to take something familiar in pop culture and rework it into something fresh and accessible. Since his street wear brand Nicopanda launched in 2015, Formichetti’s authentic and articulate take on irreverent youth has enabled the label to grow rapidly.
Nostalgia for the Nineties and Aughts has dominated contemporary style for the past few seasons and for Nicopanda’s fall 2018 collection, Formichetti also referenced the era. He clashed very different musical genres together – Seattle grunge and East Coast hip hop – and based his collection on fusing and reworking street wear staples synonymous with the era.
“It’s a YouTube culture so you just go from one to another and it’s a beautiful mismatch,” he said after the show.
Formichetti knows exactly where street wear is in 2018. Set against the pounding soundtrack that remixed Nirvana’s “Nevermind” with Lil’ Kim’s debut album, the fun and energetic collection was heavy on prints – plaid, stripes, leopard and tartan, and textures – plastic, fur, jersey and sweats. There was also a whole lot of printed logo and slogan hoodies and tees in varying lengths. Plaid flannel

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Emilio de la Morena RTW Fall 2018

A self-confessed “boy of the Eighties,” Emilio de la Morena looked for inspiration to Barbra Streisand’s “Yentl” musical from 1983 and all the ways it challenged patriarchy.
He translated the musical’s “spirit of defiance” with a lineup filled with bold, bright colors and sharp tailoring. There were mini tweed skirt suits, blazers done in opulent jacquard fabrics and an array of ultra feminine evening options, as in a bright blue gown featuring layers of ruffles or playful fuchsia minidresses matched with tights in the same shade.
The mish-mash of androgynous tailoring with feminine ruffles, delicate organzas and bold colors reflected a recurring trend seen on the London catwalks throughout the week, where designers embraced all different sides of women, in a bid to project an empowering message.
“We need to change, we need to make a difference, so it’s important to offer different options and allow women to choose,” said the designer after the show.

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Roberta Einer RTW Fall 2018

“When I’m designing clothes, it’s always about creating a second world because that’s what I believe luxury is,” designer Roberta Einer mused. “You’re selling the dream, a different reality.”
Einer drew from the Eighties, finding inspiration in movies that defined the decade such as “Blade Runner” and “Tron,” as well as holiday snaps from her parents’ photo albums. There was a lot of eye-dazzling drama in Einer’s collection with shimmery wrap dresses in leopard-print motifs draped seductively around the body, as well as faux-fur jackets in bright yellow, printed suits with strong shoulders paired with miniskirts, and hand-dyed and sequined pieces that featured contrasting feathered detailing on the cuffs. The collection also ran the gamut of daywear with textured sweaters, puffer jackets with exaggerated shoulders and reversible knitwear.
The pink satin dresses didn’t seem to be a modern take on that decade. Still, there was still plenty to ogle at — notably the Swarovski 3-D floral cutout pieces, the highlight being a glittering yellow cropped top that caught the light with every movement.

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Faustine Steinmetz RTW Fall 2018

For fall, Faustine Steinmetz delved into her French roots and dug out 10 iconic staples from the French closet to reinvent. She picked relics from the Aughts including Levi’s 501s, the Burberry trenchcoat, Fendi baguette, cream silk shirt, monogrammed Gucci boots and an Hermès scarf, and reimagined them through her variegated lens.
Steinmetz sent out a lineup that cleverly showed the stages of deconstruction and reconstruction of each garment. The show kicked off with a series of sleeveless denim jackets buttoned to look like shirts. The right shoulder and collar were replaced with mint-colored silk panels and paired with high-waisted jeans. As the collection advances, the jeans and shirt are slowly transformed through felting until the garments’ original denim and silk fabrications are obliterated.
The second series of the collection is a reversal of that idea — a sleeveless mint silk shirt is worn with textured shorts. With each look that follows, the sleeves grow in length and the shorts become less felted until they are just a regular pair of shorts belted with a Chanel-inspired braided belt.
Steinmetz continued to riff on variations of these 10 key items, showcasing the masterful couture techniques she honed while in Paris. Among the highlights are

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Dilara Findikoglu RTW Fall 2018

Amidst the hustle of the City of London, filled with financial professionals rushing to return home after work, up-and-coming designer Dilara Findikoglu sought to create a female utopia where all types of women are accepted.
“I used to think that my ideal woman is a powerful boss woman. But as I grow up I’ve changed my mind a little bit; I realized that in order to be united, we all need to be accepted. There’s no elimination,” said the designer, who is best known for her rebellious streak and has not been afraid to use her shows as a platform to touch on politics, religion and feminism.
This season she wanted to evoke a more “peaceful” feeling, with a strong, thought-provoking lineup that brought together the androgynous and the romantic. Tailoring played a key role: traditional pinstripe jackets were cinched at the waist, others were spliced on the sides and paired with skirts featuring thigh-high slits, while more decadent versions were done in blue velvet and embellished with gold sequins.
Elsewhere, there were softer organza shift dresses held together with velvet bows and feminine tweed skirts, paired with beautifully embellished corsetry.
“Embellishment comes naturally to me because I’m a real collector. For this collection

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David Koma RTW Fall 2018

David Koma said he became “obsessed” with the ethnographic photography of 19th-century artist Edward Curtis, which led him to explore the traditional dress of Native American tribes and interpret their folklore and cultures for fall.
But when you put prevalent notions of what comprises the traditional dress of tribes like the Apache or Chinookan Indians into Koma and pull the lever, what comes out is far from a pastiche of silver and turquoise belt-buckles, feather headdresses and fringed suede chaps. Working in a pared-back palette of black, white, red and violet, he translated those tribal codes through a Sixties Mod lens into a lineup of sexy, sassy clothes, marrying satin-shiny calf hair with hand-embroidered mesh, leather and shearling.
Nods to gaucho dress could be seen in the flared leather skirt and black turtleneck, worn with Western-inspired calf-hair boots; in the long sleeveless coat layered over a white knit and tall boots, and in the black calf-hair jean jacket, trimmed with black, white and red fringing.
A feathered headdress was reimagined into macramé embroidery, and sparkly crystal or laser-cut mirror embellishment and appeared as feathers of varying scale on red-carpet-ready dresses. And those turquoise and silver belt buckles? Koma adapted them into shiny circular clasps

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David Koma RTW Fall 2018

David Koma said he became “obsessed” with the ethnographic photography of 19th-century artist Edward Curtis, which led him to explore the traditional dress of Native American tribes and interpret their folklore and cultures for fall.
But when you put prevalent notions of what comprises the traditional dress of tribes like the Apache or Chinookan Indians into Koma and pull the lever, what comes out is far from a pastiche of silver and turquoise belt-buckles, feather headdresses and fringed suede chaps. Working in a pared-back palette of black, white, red and violet, he translated those tribal codes through a Sixties Mod lens into a lineup of sexy, sassy clothes, marrying satin-shiny calf hair with hand-embroidered mesh, leather and shearling.
Nods to gaucho dress could be seen in the flared leather skirt and black turtleneck, worn with Western-inspired calf-hair boots; in the long sleeveless coat layered over a white knit and tall boots, and in the black calf-hair jean jacket, trimmed with black, white and red fringing.
A feathered headdress was reimagined into macramé embroidery, and sparkly crystal or laser-cut mirror embellishment and appeared as feathers of varying scale on red-carpet-ready dresses. And those turquoise and silver belt buckles? Koma adapted them into shiny circular clasps

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Marques’ Almeida RTW Fall 2018

Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida took their far-reaching cues from the Instagram posts of their so-called “MA girls” of things such as motorcyclists, Gwyneth Paltrow and Joseph Fiennes in “Shakespeare in Love,” Eighties prom dresses, fashion school projects, selfies in prairie shirts or fancy dress, Renaissance paintings and even The Jackson Five. In short, what moves their muses, moves Marques’ Almeida.
“We look at these girls, what they’re posting, what they’re wearing and how they wear it and then just spin it all together,” explained Marques. It’s a meta approach that translated to another high-energy, eclectic mash-up of silhouettes, prints and attitudes.
An acid-wash tie-dye print opened the collection, on a pair of flared pants under a matching skirt, finished with a blousy parka, with unbuttoned panels falling away from the waistline. The print appeared throughout in pieces like variously proportioned balloon skirts, roomy cargo pants, fluid silk dresses and in trim boot-cut jeans.
The outerwear included a desirable black and silver shearling-lined aviator jacket that was teamed with a long pink and black striped bias-cut skirt, and a silver foil bomber that reached to the knee. Renaissance details were at play in tops that nodded to doublets, and in the pillowy sleeve heads.
The duo

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Sharon Wauchob RTW Fall 2018

Sharon Wauchob examined the elements of femininity for fall.
“I have different levels of inspiration,” she said. “I have a lot photographic books that I’ve collected over the years from Paris and I rediscovered them. It’s the whole idea of movement and the female body. That feeling of fragility, that is why there is a lot of the heavier, protective tailoring.”
Wauchob juxtaposed masculine references with feminine elements and worked in luxe details such as tassels and feathers to her well-constructed collection of suiting, dresses, outerwear and separates.
She wrapped silk satin around the waistband of black slouchy pants and paired this with a pink silk blazer that was adorned with delicate handmade and hand-knotted tassel fringes. Other notions of masculinity were present in a trenchcoat, where she mixed fine wools with soft tailoring wools.
More feminine pieces came in the form of dramatic floaty dresses which were worn under a trench coat. She hand-dyed silk chiffon and created a soft ombré in hues of apricot and soft green as seen on a flowy floor-grazing dress. The designer also incorporated elements of lingerie and fashioned a strapless dress with a lace bustier top. She then cut pieces of lace in the shape of petals

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Palmer/Harding RTW Fall 2018

Levi Palmer and his partner Matthew Harding made their name with their play on the classic shirt, tweaking it every season — often with asymmetric hems — while other times playing with proportions and or reinventing it into various guises such as dresses or outerwear.
This season, the men rethought their strategy and sought to understand their customer profile, studying who ordered directly from the brand’s e-shop. “Our woman is a very comfortable woman,” Palmer said. “They want comfort and style, and things they can live in from 7 in the morning to midnight because they live busy lives and are constantly on the go.”
Palmer and Harding took that as a starting point for their fall collection and sent out a lineup featuring wide trousers cut high on the waist paired with wedged mules and high-collared shirts.
“It’s about how to get the most movement in a trouser — sometimes it looks like a skirt and then you move and it has a surprise to it,” Palmer said of the cut.
The humble shirt continued to be subverted: elongated into wraparound versions with handkerchief hems; cut with asymmetrical necklines to reveal one shoulder; or manipulated into a trenchcoat with twisted fastenings. Shirts also came

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Christopher Kane RTW Fall 2018

Birds do it, bees do it – even educated fleas do it: Now Christopher Kane has done a whole collection about it, complete with black leather and colorful lace, cage dresses, silky slips and slashed fabrics.
Before the show, Kane said sex was just part of human behavior, “and for me it’s fascinating if done in a very beautiful, provocative and sensual way. My clothes are there to empower women. It’s always about empowerment for me and about that beautiful, almost Hollywood glamour.”
Kane has long explored sex in his collections, along with science, the natural world and outer space. While he may have built the collection around the controversial theme, it was more about the idea than the act, a meditation on the power of clothing, plus a few erotic illustrations from “The Joy of Sex” and “More Joy of Sex” on marabou-trimmed dresses and tops.
Admittedly, there are not many women out there who could brave the tight, lipstick red lace dress that barely covered the essentials, or the sheer plastic skirt with a furry trim. Otherwise it was mostly PG-13.
There were shiny leather tabard dresses adorned with lace bibs and high collars, gray woolen coats with slashes down the arms, black

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MM6 Maison Margiela RTW Fall 2018

For its fall presentation, the team at MM6 took over a pub in central London and covered it entirely in silver foil. Models stood on foiled kegs and were dressed all in silver in various textures, from coated denim and leather to tinsel, shearling and sequins.
MM6 reworked the brand’s staples, including five-pocket jeans, the turtleneck, the duffle coat and the slipdress by adding textures or changing their proportions. Men’s vests were shrunken and wrapped tightly around the torso, while duffer coats were meticulously quilted. And as a nod to the Queen of England, one look riffed on her famous Balmoral attire — a head scarf and her green coat — reinterpreted as a foiled head-wrap resembling an emergency blanket and a silver coat with slightly elongated sleeves.
In the spirit of the label, familiar items were given new purpose — a motorcycle helmet was used as a bag and disco balls, which were dangling from the ceiling, were the inspiration for this season’s new boot. MM6’s classic ankle boot was reinterpreted with a spool heel and covered in mirrored tiles.

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Huishan Zhang RTW Fall 2018

Huishan Zhang watched Wong Kar-Wai’s stylish films — “Chungking Express” and “2046” — and based his sophisticated fall collection on the director’s vision of dark romance.
The show opened with femme fatales all in black, a welcome dark turn for Zhang. A high-neck top in sparkly sheer mesh was modeled after cheongsams — a recurring motif in the show — and was tucked into a leather wrap skirt, glammed up by rows of jet bead fringing. A leather jacket hemmed with feathers came with pleated leather trousers — not an easy thing to make look elegant, but Zhang pulled it off.
A full skirt in patent leather, cut open to show an underlying mini, had a fun youthful appeal, vamped up by a sheer top. Shiny black leather trousers with peplum hips had broad appeal — more than the jarring one-shouldered olive green knot bustier that topped a pink and silver jacquard ensemble.
Then the show show segued back to the fairy-tale romance that Zhang is known for: a bouclé tweed skirt suit fringed with white pearls carried with it the refinement of Rue Cambon, while a blossom jacquard in sugary shades came in full-skirted shapes played against pearlescent sequins.
Zhang’s brand of unapologetic

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Baja East Fall 2018

The last six months or so have been full of big changes for Scott Studenberg and John Targon of Baja East. They’re now a bicoastal operation — Studenberg moved to Los Angeles, where much of the collection is produced, over the summer. After years of working out of their apartment, they have a proper office on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. And as of earlier this month, Targon has an additional full-time job at Marc Jacobs, where he was hired to direct the contemporary portion of the collection. “I’ve always been obsessed with Marc and the brand; I’m excited they asked me to come on board,” he said of his new role, declining to comment further.
Despite the spate of personal and professional changes, the designers said the division of labor remains the same. Baja East is continuing to operate business as usual, “1,000 percent, full throttle,” said Targon, during a preview of their fall collection, the first they’ve shown via look book and private appointment instead of a show or presentation, to focus on sales and growth. To that end, another change for the brand is that the prices have come down significantly by working with their manufacturers on better

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Roksanda RTW Fall 2018

Roksanda Ilincic said she was looking to dress women for real life, and for once-in-a-lifetime moments, and this collection had it all. The sharp and the soft, the liquid and the structured were all done in the designer’s signature offbeat color combinations, which this season included mustard, lavender, aqua, camel and bright red.
“It was big cast, with clothes that a woman needs from the morning until the evening – all the time. I think I am a designer who always cares about women and how to dress them. I want to protect her and shelter her,” Ilincic said of her collection that was both strong and sweet.
For daytime, there were sharp camel suits with lots of volume and military rigor with a slick of red on the back or sleeves. A sleeveless camel dress was spare and elegant with a knot at the back while coats were dramatic, ranging from the long and sweeping to fuzzy, bearish ones made from brushed camels hair and left natural or dyed a Delft blue.
For evening, she tossed lightweight plaid blankets over satin dresses — some with surreal, sinuous drawings by the artist and dancer Caroline Denervaud — and others made from layered swathes

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Erdem RTW Fall 2018

Are the Time’s Up and #MeToo movements to blame with their red-carpet protests? There’s been a lot of black, and echoes of Victoriana, on the London runways this season, with Erdem Moralioglu the latest designer to embrace the darkness in his beautiful, if melancholy, show.
Channeling the spirit of the American dancer Adele Astaire, sister of Fred and widow of Lord Charles Cavendish, Moralioglu sent dark, flowery jacquard dresses, sheer black polka dot veils and inky furs down the narrow corridors of the National Portrait Gallery in London, which served as his show venue this season.
“Adele married the son of the Duke of Devonshire and he died very early on in the marriage. Every year after that, she would visit Lismore, the Irish castle where she’d lived with her husband. I was obsessed by this idea of this woman who keeps coming back year after year,” the designer related backstage.
He worked that obsession into dark coats, capes and dresses with gold and silvery flowers, some styled with dark polka dot tights, face veils or long gloves. He laid the same veil-like fabric over a floor-sweeping yellow or pink dresses, too, or paired it with velvet for a long dress with a

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Peter Pilotto RTW Fall 2018

Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos eschewed the traditional catwalk format, presenting their new fall range with a dinner at Tramp, the historic gentleman’s club on Jermyn Street.
The setting got the designers in a hedonistic mood. They were thinking about the girls who go to Tramp and wanted to offer them clothes that would make them feel “comfortable, confident and a little psychedleic” throughout the night. Cue a fun, colorful lineup filled with laid-back silhouettes and decadent fabrications, inspired by the world of interiors, an ongoing fascination for the design duo.
They translated the gradience of blown glasses into dégradé floral prints splashed over flowing, asymmetric midi dresses, while loosely tailored jackets featured tasseled belts and opulent jacquard fabrics mirroring Biedermaier artworks.
The richness of tapestries also inspired a series of bodycon knit dresses hand-embroidered with prismatic sequins and buttons, which were among the strongest in the lineup.
“The collection is built almost like a home, bringing together many different elements. For us the mixing of the two worlds comes naturally, women who like fashion are also drawn to interesting furniture,” de Vos said after the show.

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Margaret Howell Women’s and Men’s RTW Fall 2018

Margaret Howell’s collections are always true to her brand of timeless utilitarianism. Her androgynous silhouettes are sensual, yet designed with functionality in mind.
Howell showcased her men’s and women’s collection together as in previous seasons and she hit the mark with both. The British designer opened with a series of simple tweed knits and tartan shirts paired with trousers that were tapered and cropped just above the ankles. Other highlights included button-down cotton shirts with ruffled Peter Pan collars, simple silk dresses and knitwear that featured a geometric motif.
Fabrics focused on the traditional with Prince of Wales checks seen on pants and coats, as well as stoic cotton twills and fluid silks in a muted color palette that included heather grey, putty, bark, black and various shades of green.

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Edeline Lee RTW Fall 2018

For her fall collection, Edeline Lee staged an immersive presentation at the BFC Show Space. She worked with artist Kyung Roh Bannwart to transform the space into Eve’s garden with sculptural greenery that offset the designer’s long, monastic silhouettes.
“The woman is turning inward and she’s grounded and contemplating,” Lee said of her muse this season.
Cascading floral jacquard coats that Lee called her “dark secret garden” were repeated in solid wool, and floor-skimming floral coats that buttoned at the navel were highlights of the collection.
There were also weighty Flou Bubble jacquard and Georgette Champion dresses in purple, red, navy, black and green that imbued a sense of dark romance and introversion. Silhouettes were elongated and modest and the swaths of fabric felt like armor around the Edeline Lee woman who, while grounded and meditative, is certainly not vulnerable.
Lee continued to develop the knot motif she started last season. For fall, she evolved it into large tassels that added weight to the outerwear, giving the heavy draping an additional dimension.

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