< Shows | International Fashion and Models Portal

Shows

DDUOGOFF Men’s Spring 2018

Daniel DuGoff used a trip to Taipei with the CFDA Incubator program to form the foundation of his men’s collection.
DuGoff, who studied architecture before working for Patrik Ervell and Marc Jacobs, said on the trip he was able to experience the urban grit of Taipei along with the tropical landscapes of Yangmingshan National Park, which is located outside of the city.
DuGoff used those contrasts to present a minimal lineup of classic men’s sportswear energized with color — green, mustard, white and navy — and prints including plaid, an abstracted window pane and a hazy leaf print.
High notes from the collection included the short shorts, which mimicked the silhouette of a swim trunk but were made from shirting material, the Fifties-inspired knot polos with embroidery on the chest, and the hooded jacket made from cotton and nylon grosgrain.
DuGoff has said his primary goal is to produce easy clothes that men will want to wear on an everyday basis. He accomplished that goal with this lineup and also introduced some new pieces into his customer’s wardrobe.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Perry Ellis Men’s Spring 2018: The company injected performance features into its tailored clothing uniform and then layered on fashion.
Hecho Men’s Spring 2018: The

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Dim Mak Men’s Spring 2018

Steve Aoki opted to show his men’s wear line, Dim Mak, a few days after the official New York Fashion Week: Men’s schedule, which was probably a smart idea given his elaborate vision.
Last season, Aoki installed a skate park inside Skylight Clarkson Sq and Mangchi, a self-described “hammer” band, performed a spirited set as actual skaters, who wore the collection, dropped in and out of two half pipes.
This season Aoki, a DJ who also owns Dim Mak Records, held a presentation before shutting down a New York block to hold a runway show and concert outside The Build. The show, which featured performances from Ayo & Teo, Bok Nero, Ma$e and Sonny Digital, also commemorated the release of his new album, Kolony, which is out on July 21.
“I like to combine both worlds,” said Aoki, who started his Dim Mak record label in 1996. “People know me as a DJ first so it just made sense to do this type of event.”
Aoki’s collection was titled Paradise Found, which according to Aoki is indicative of the current climate. “People are looking for paradise amid chaos,” he said. He imbued this idea throughout the assortment, which consisted of military staples — bomber and utility jackets and cargo pants —

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Escada Spring 2018

Escada kept the same inspirations the design team chose for resort for its spring collection: Isabella Rossellini for the main line and Sofia Coppola for Escada Sport.
References to either muse were difficult to spot in the actual clothes, which took on extremely bold color and color-blocking in the mainline and generic denim and sporty parka/windbreakers in the sport line.
The main collection’s attempt to modernize with a focus on classic separates silhouettes was compromised by some unwieldy color combinations, for example, a magenta blazer over a cobalt blue top and white pants, all with a satiny sheen. There was an orange story, followed by a mint-green-dominated delivery. The best things were the simplest: a white shirtdress with tiny jeweled embroidery and a striped shirtdress with nice movement.
See More Fashion Reviews From WWD:
C2H4 Los Angeles Men’s Spring 2018: Chen wanted to design laboratory workwear for the year 2082.
Theory Men’s Spring 2018: The collection marked the debut of new designer Martin Andersson.
General Idea Men’s Spring 2018: The designer offered a modern interpretation of hippie culture.
Raun Larose Men’s Spring 2018: Eighties tech start-ups provided inspiration for the line.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Theory Men’s Spring 2018

Like many transplanted Europeans, new Theory designer Martin Andersson, previously of Cos, couldn’t resist the allure of Americana.
“I concentrated on the great American classics rooted in uniforms, sports and workwear,” Andersson said at the brand’s rooftop presentation, with Manhattan’s skyline as a backdrop.
The sporty pieces included sweatpants, hoodies and bombers in cotton, technical nylon and paper-thin leather. The workwear influences were clear on updated Dickies-inspired pants with a single pleat, as well as a “geeky” take on a railroad-stripe suit.
Punches of yellow and orange gave the mostly neutral lineup jolts of energy.
The tailored clothing offering had a subtle Fifties feel with the addition of the Gansevoort silhouette, a softly constructed suit with a natural shoulder and narrow pants. The new style came in a travel jersey and a technical nylon and polyester seersucker. Ultrathin anoraks worn under blazers enhanced the technical yet modern urban feel.
The lineup might come across as unexciting at first, but after a closer look, the minimalist approach felt like a perfect palate-cleanser.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

General Idea Men’s Spring 2018

As in seasons past, designer Bumsuk Choi steered clear of being a trend-driven brand, instead steering General Idea to create its own path. And Thursday’s spring show was no different.
Based on the notions of the hippie culture from the Sixties and Seventies, the lineup consisted of silky shirts with bandana prints, ethnic embroideries on the cuffs of shirts and denim, and racing stripes on the sides of trousers.
“As a society we have been accustomed to not be able to live without our phones,” said Choi backstage, shortly after sending out oversize logos shouting “No post” on the backs and front of shirts.
A nice surprise, color was a huge message this season, with General Idea offering up bright reds, yellows and blues in a variety of looks, while staying away from white and black that has become predictable.
With this solid effort, Choi gets credit for making us put down our phones and transporting us to his modern hippie universe.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Perry Ellis Men’s Spring 2018: The company injected performance features into its tailored clothing uniform and then layered on fashion.
Hecho Men’s Spring 2018: The spring collection expanded on singular, identifiable staples in new, still breathable, fabrics.
Boss Men’s Spring 2018: Designer Ingo Wilts

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Bode Men’s Spring 2018

As a child, Emily Bode spent her summers at her uncle’s house in the south of France. She slept in his grenier, which means attic in French, where she was surrounded by bedsheets, bath towels and antique linens.
“This collection is about my uncle’s generational relationship with the attic and what the attic means to me as a space,” Bode said. “It’s a place to take in memories of yesteryear and reflect on one’s mortality.”
Bode, who graduated from Parsons before launching her men’s wear line in 2016, re-created that sentimental space for her presentation. Models lounged around wood-frame beds while the scent of lavender lingered throughout the room.
Quilting was the focus of her previous collection, but this season she concentrated on florals and stripes. Models wore floral printed raincoats, terrycloth jackets and striped sleep pants. Shirts were made from cotton Quaker lace and French linens. Other highlights included the floral tapestry jackets — specifically the mustard style decorated with a double row of buttons.
The overall effect was inviting. Bode has a clear talent for mixing textures, colors and textiles in an intriguing way. She’s also adept at rendering fabrics typically associated with the word “antique” to appear modern and strong. We

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Sanchez-Kane Men’s Spring 2018

On the “about” section of her web site, Barbara Sanchez-Kane defines her label as a “Mexican clothing brand curated by emotional chaos.”
What that means is that instead of sourcing ideas from an artist, location or concept, she lets her feelings lead the way.
This season Sanchez-Kane, who launched her brand in 2015 after working for Bernhard Willhelm, parsed the sensations that come along with stereotypes and societal standards, which she mainly portrayed through constrictive design details.

Sanchez-Kane, who is known for her tailored pieces, used the curls in a pinwheel, her favorite toy as a child, as appendages on blazers, denim jackets and pants. These curls, which were buttoned to garments, sometimes connected pieces of a suit or wrapped around the looks to relay the idea of restriction. Sanchez-Kane also utilized ties, straps and metal wire — one piece sat stiffly on a model like a T-shirt — to underscore this message.

According to Sanchez-Kane, the restrictions created by social norms lead to hiding one’s feelings and this translated to pieces that were stuffed with fabric or pants that were dotted with three-dimensional boxes. She incorporated messages from her journal entries onto pieces — one T-shirt read “Freelance Lover” — along with Mexican

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Ovadia & Sons Men’s Spring 2018

Continuing the “narrative of last season,” Ovadia & Sons once again fueled a sporty lifestyle in its spring collection.
The trend-conscious lineup showcased an array of silk souvenir jackets, retro Fifties rayon shirts and geeky-cool pastel-colored suits.
“All the cool kids in school wore baseball jackets, but we couldn’t afford one,” said Shimon Ovadia, who designs the line with his brother Ariel. “So we’re doing them now.”
The less-predictable print that appeared on a coach’s jacket, a pop-over and a track pant was the first peek at a capsule with Interesni Kazki artists from the Ukraine that the twins discovered in their travels.
Their affinity for animal prints worked hand-in-hand with the tribal references they used to update their signature tracksuits.
The jewel tones employed in key pieces such as car coats and track pants added a sense of sophistication to the casual lineup. And the use of cross-body bags and bucket hats served as a reminder that the Ovadia brothers have once again embraced the trends of the season and brought their own twist to it.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Deveaux Men’s Spring 2018

“Nothingness is just as important as things that are there,” Andrea Tsao, one-third of Deveaux’s design team, posited ahead of the brand’s fourth outing. That philosophical outlook was taken from Japanese architect Tadao Ando’s design M.O. — whose use of muted palettes, clean lines and leanings toward raw materials parallel design elements in the Deveaux world.
The tether to Ando was light, bearing conceptual details that made minimal silhouettes feel special. An “architect” car coat that opened the show, for example, played with the idea of spacing and exposure, featuring pockets that wove in and out. “What you see and what you can’t see is a large part of his architecture,” Tsao continued. Other details like pockets-within-pockets and belts weaving through cutouts teetered on modern and luxurious design.
The overall tone was more relaxed than previous efforts, featuring an experimentation with oversize fits and vintage sensibilities. Roomy, A-line coats in black washed nylon and glen plaid erred on the side of sophistication, while color-blocked knitwear, khaki-and-white top combos, and chunky sneakers were retro and retail-friendly propositions.
The team also showed a few women’s looks, which showcased architectural references with more freedom. Standouts included a sharp tailored blazer and offbeat olive cotton shirt. It

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Death to Tennis Men’s Spring 2018

Death to Tennis designers William Watson and Vincent Oshin have enlisted artists in the past to collaborate on their men’s collection, and for spring, it was no different.
The designers took inspiration from a work of colorful peacock feathers by New York-based artist Keith Mackie. They used the print as a metaphor for the obsession today’s society has with vanity.
They used the signature print in a variety of garments, ranging from scarves, jackets, shorts and even trousers, which they juxtaposed with more-subtle pieces.
The peacock print also translated into the color palette, which ranged from bright reds to emerald greens.
One standout was an array of waffle knits in pieces such as shorts and T-shirts, which gave the assortment a lounge-y and cool feel.
As an overall, Watson and Oshin were able zero in and present a modern collection that is understandable to today’s man.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Perry Ellis Men’s Spring 2018: The company injected performance features into its tailored clothing uniform and then layered on fashion.
Hecho Men’s Spring 2018: The spring collection expanded on singular, identifiable staples in new, still breathable, fabrics.
Boss Men’s Spring 2018: Designer Ingo Wilts used a variety of nautical references in the line.
Nick Graham Men’s Spring 2018: The designer was inspired

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Raf Simons Men’s Spring 2018

Blade Runner came to life under the Manhattan Bridge Tuesday night courtesy of Raf Simons.
The designer created his own version of the iconic film by taking over an alley in Chinatown, complete with the overwhelming smell of fish wafting through the air and the ear-numbing rumble of subways overhead.
Simons continued his long-standing collaboration with British graphic artist Peter Saville who said the designer had requested access to his archives while preparing for the show. Simons utilized vintage Joy Division and New Order album covers as graphic details on both the set and on several of the garments including sliced-open sweatshirts and graphic Ts.
The opening look – a slouchy black rubber trenchcoat paired with matching rain boots, gardening hat and see-through umbrella with glow-in-the-dark shaft – set the tone for the cinematic collection.
“There were a lot of things that go back to my early days – why we started doing the things we did,” Simons said. “There were strong music references from the past juxtapositioned and taken out of context. It was about movies, “Blade Runner,” it’s about cultures sliding together, Asian culture, cultures of the West. There was more of a new wave punk attitude.”
Long raincoats in a variety of

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

N. Hoolywood Men’s Spring 2018

N. Hoolywood is growing up — that is, at least for one season. In an apparent 180-degree turn from fall’s homeless youth reference, where designer Daisuke Obana amped up a more-is-more style philosophy, the latest offering boasted a tone of quiet sophistication with a classic American undercurrent.
Obana, a Japanese native, was in the U.S. during last year’s contentious presidential election, which turned his mind to a journey through American history. He looked to John F. Kennedy, whose suave, debonair appearance has become a symbol of a happier, simpler America.
Preppy varsity references — from the bomber jackets and elongated cardigans to university lettering — were indicative of the Fifties.
Elsewhere, military references drew from JFK’s military career while a Marilyn Monroe print was a playful jab at his personal peccadillos. The overall tone was younger, balancing a collegiate spirit with clean, soft tailored silhouettes. “I wanted to put out something very simple, sleek, traditional and refined,” Obana said backstage.
Notable was the designer’s modern interpretation of traditional style. Loosening up classic suits with generous proportions was not only younger (and a big trend on the European runways), but gave way to greater layering potential and a notion of trans-seasonal dressing. Comfortable, professional, elevated —

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Carlos Campos Men’s Spring 2018

Luis Barragan, the famous Mexican architect, was the starting point for Carlos Campos, who said he was influenced by Barragan’s vivid use of color and minimal designs.
Campos worked within a tight palette: cobalt blue and bright red tempered with tan, navy, black and white. The highlight of the collection was the outerwear, which included a mac, a tan floor-length coat and a rain cape. He brought a Latin twist to American classics by embroidering items with alforjas, the small pleats typically found on cubaveras.
The rest of the assortment lacked ingenuity. Campos presented color-blocked rompers, woven T-shirts, pleated shorts and monochrome suits. He played with the logo trend by showing sweatshirts emblazoned with Carlos Campos in an Old English font. A few women’s looks also popped up: color-blocked cotton dresses, rompers and vests.
Campos has steadily grown his business over the past few seasons, which is commendable given this retail climate, but this collection fell flat.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Todd Snyder Men’s Spring 2018: The designer revealed a much baggier silhouette for spring.
Private Policy Men’s Spring 2018: Although Western references are not new in men’s wear, Private Policy’s adventurous version offered a unique and fresh perspective.
R. Swiader Men’s Spring 2018: Rafal Swiader

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Feng Chen Wang Men’s Spring 2018

Feng Chen Wang graduated from the Royal College of Art in 2015, but she’s already amassed a strong celebrity following — Rihanna, M.I.A. and Russell Westbrook are fans — with her men’s collection, which merges streetwear with technical fabrics.
This season, Wang wanted to take the negative connotation out of the Made in China label and she did that by focusing on craftsmanship rather than mass production. Wang, who is Chinese, produces her collection in China.
She brought a new spin to basic athleticwear. Sweatpants, joggers and cargo pants were updated with deliberately placed slashes, pockets and drawstrings. Wang lent parkas a bit of drama by elongating them to the floor, adding ruching details to the sleeves or making them more voluminous. And instead of hiding the Made in China label, she placed it on the front of T-shirts — the Nike checks on Air Jordan Ones also featured the label. Three-dimensional “MIC” letters, which have become a signature for Wang, appeared on shirt sleeves and waist bags. Wang also presented a couple of aprons and exaggerated gloves to bring home the craftsmanship theme.
It’s hard to stand out in the flooded streetwear market, but Wang managed to do that with a collection that

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Todd Snyder Men’s Spring 2018

Todd Snyder offered a “melting pot of fashion” in his spring collection, drawing references from around the world — Morocco, France and his own Iowa backyard.
“It’s a mish-mash of different looks,” he said backstage before his show for New York Fashion Week: Men’s on Monday night. “Active, military, sartorial.” Even his father’s propensity to wear black socks with shorts — “which always annoyed me, but now I’m doing it, too” — made an appearance.
In a show that featured a musical performance from Lewis Del Mar, those eclectic references were visible in a suit fashioned after an old French burlap coffee-bean bag, Marrakech-inspired multistripes in linen bomber jackets and a Mexican Baja white and olive hoodie.
But the big news came from a radical change in the silhouette. From oversize pleated pants, shorts and Japanese selvage jeans to softly constructed boxy-cut double-breasted suits, “the pants are much baggier,” he said. “And there are pleats everywhere. The proportion has changed a lot.”
The designer also showcased his long-standing collaboration with Champion by “resurrecting a few classics,” such as a sweater with a diagonal color-blocked design and logo T-shirts worn under blazers and top coats.
In past seasons, Snyder has been playing it safe, but with

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Maiden Noir Men’s Spring 2018

Finding a happy medium always seems to be a challenge, but not for Maiden Noir. The brand’s spring collection seamlessly juxtaposed a series of paintings by David Hockney during his visits to California with the Vietnam War protest movement taking place during the late Sixties.
Taking a cue from Hockney’s poolside culture, the brand offered up rayon shirts, lounge button-up shirts and pants, while on the opposite end of the spectrum, it utilized tie-dyed camouflage in a cotton and nylon trench and oversize long coats in parachute fabrics, making them light and transparent.
Vibrant stripes continued to be a staple, used this time in lounge and camp shirts, but this season they were even bolder, which helped add contrast to the lineup.
Overall, the combination of muted tones with pops of brights created a pleasing balance and a loose sensibility to the assortment.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Head of State Men’s Spring 2018: Taofeek Abijako, who just turned 19, looked to West African artists for his collection.
Krammer & Stoudt Men’s Spring 2018: The collection had a casual Baja feel but also included a tuxedo for the first time.
Bristol Los Angeles Men’s Spring 2018: The collection offered a unique take on streetwear from the Aughts.
Wood House Men’s

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Bristol Los Angeles Men’s Spring 2018

Luke Tadashi and Tommy Nowels, who design Bristol Los Angeles, drew from early childhood fashion recollections for spring.

“My first fashion memories were going to the supermarket with my mother and looking at Slam magazine,” Tadashi said. “The magazine featured a mix of NBA and urban street culture and those Rocawear and Sean John ads really had an impact on me.”

The homage to streetwear in the early 2000s translated into an array of updated denim tracksuits that featured boxy, elongated track jackets and baggy sweatpants with snap closures on the sides for that retro Adidas feel.
Skater-inspired oversize corduroy pants cut on the bias provided interesting textures and volumes while celebrating the early Aughts. The use of Cupro fabric in half-zip tops and shorts provided the feminine touch that is also part of Bristol’s DNA.
The collection did a good job of identifying a core message for Bristol and moving streetwear beyond its too-long obsession with the Nineties. And that’s a welcome change.
See More From the Men’s 2018 Collections:
Wood House Men’s Spring 2018: Julian Woodhouse presented a playful collection to escape from the taxing political climate.
David Hart Men’s Spring 2018: The designer referenced Cuba for his retro-themed, colorful collection.
Valentino Men’s Spring 2018: Pierpaolo Piccioli’s casual lineup

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Y’s Resort 2018

Highlights from the Pink label included bikers and reversible bombers lined with a splashy reinterpretation of a print from Japan’s Taishō Democracy period in the Twenties, which also played out on floaty dresses.
Among additions to the showroom was a full women’s capsule from the Exclusive line, part of the brand’s Black sub-line, focused on signature, mannish, plain suiting options with twists like dusty check prints and oversize spins on the shirtdress with bow ties.
Adding a dose of color was the scrunchy tie-and-dye stains splashed on T-shirts, shirts and Bermudas in polyester and crepe de chine. Summery options included twisted tanks and a white linen jacket with pleats at the back, while the brand’s Rismat casual subline also continues to gather momentum. Hits there included the super-relaxed, ample, hybrid cardigans and sweaters with tonal shirting sections in a range of lovely shades going from electric blue to dusty yellow.
More From Paris Haute Couture Week Fall 2017:
Christian Dior Couture Fall 2017: As the house of Dior turns 70, Maria Grazia Chiuri designed her fall couture collection an homage to the house founder.
Atelier Versace Couture Fall 2017: The collection blended Baroque references and rock ‘n’ roll — with a soupçon of 3-D printing.
Iris Van Herpen

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Maticevski Resort 2018

For his debut Paris presentation, rising Australian designer Toni Maticevski stuck to his signature sculptural silhouettes, mashing contrasting textures like sports mesh, tailoring and ornate brocades.
The moods meandered, too, from dark sexy creations showing a bit of skin to long double-breasted jackets in rose brocade and souffle tulle gowns, albeit with abstract constructions that tempered the princess tone.
Slogans nodded to titles of previous collections, like The Elegant Rebel or Tomboy Heiress, with the designer also incorporating a print inspired by old movie titles from the Thirties and Forties that lent a shadowy, melancholic note.
More From Paris Haute Couture Week Fall 2017:
Christian Dior Couture Fall 2017: As the house of Dior turns 70, Maria Grazia Chiuri designed her fall couture collection an homage to the house founder.
Atelier Versace Couture Fall 2017: The collection blended Baroque references and rock ‘n’ roll — with a soupçon of 3-D printing.
Iris Van Herpen Couture Fall 2017: For her 10th anniversary show, the designer sent out aquatic-themed creations to a performance by underwater group Between Music.
Paris to Honor Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel Couture Show: Mayor Anne Hidalgo is to decorate the couturier with a Grand Vermeil medal, the city’s highest distinction.

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Ingie Paris Resort 2018

Ingie Chalhoub took resort quite literally, offering up a languid collection inspired by the California lifestyle of the Seventies. Palazzo pants, jumpsuits and flowing dresses featured paisley or swirling vintage-style prints in a variety of pastel hues on white backgrounds, with floral adornments and hand-sewn braided details to knock home the hippie-chic message. Others were worked in plain candy-colored silk that flowed on the body, or in more structured jersey with a Neoprene texture.
These were contrasted with glittering fabrics that glammed things up. A graphic sequined guipure worked well on a long maxiskirt in off-white or a black shirt with translucent organza sleeves, while an ivory boyfriend blazer with sequin details had a relaxed charm. On a striped rough-hewn fabric, meanwhile, the contrast of metallic threads and pastels made for a refreshing look.
More From Paris Haute Couture Week Fall 2017:
Christian Dior Couture Fall 2017: As the house of Dior turns 70, Maria Grazia Chiuri designed her fall couture collection an homage to the house founder.
Atelier Versace Couture Fall 2017: The collection blended Baroque references and rock ‘n’ roll — with a soupçon of 3-D printing.
Iris Van Herpen Couture Fall 2017: For her 10th anniversary show, the designer sent out aquatic-themed creations to a

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more

Valentino Couture Fall 2017

Years ago, John Fairchild had a name for the type of fashion editor who early on embraced the shroudlike avant-garde side of the Eighties, and who appeared to fall into a state of rapture at shows she loved. That name: fashion nun. It wasn’t a compliment.
Would that Mr. Fairchild were around today, to sit down with Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccioli over a good bottle of red and engage in some serious guy talk about fashion. Perhaps the younger might convince the older that there’s nothing wrong with a little fashion religion.
He’d at least make an impressive case. Piccioli believes genuinely in the power of fashion, couture in particular, to elevate the spirit. Some may find that thought itself profane. At a preview, he explained his premise. “In this moment, everything is digital and about rationalism,” Piccioli said. “I think all of us are looking for something more spiritual, beyond reality. This is really close to the idea of couture because every aspect of the sacred is expressed by rituals, and couture is made by rituals. Sacred is what is beyond reality, what you don’t see but you just feel, you just perceive. What makes couture special, unique and magical is what you don’t see —

Follow WWD on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook.</pRead More…

      

Read more