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Growing Pains RTW Spring 2018

This label’s designer, who simply goes by Yulia, mixed a hodgepodge of colors, textures and influences for a collection that had no recognizable theme or cohesiveness. There was a feminine peplum top paired with metallic track pants, a pajama-like crushed velvet jumpsuit, a sailor outfit and moto jackets for both men and women with oddly placed straps wrapping around the upper arms and chest. Overall, the offering signaled that as a designer, the former DJ hasn’t yet found her feet.

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Yohei Ohno RTW Spring 2018

Yohei Ohno mixed vinyl, nylon and sheer mesh with natural fabrics such as cotton, linen and seersucker for feminine dresses and skirts, some with cinched waists and exaggerated puff sleeves. While his palette consisted mostly of primary colors and neutrals, there were flashes of silver and gold in a pair of vinyl gloves and a glittering bag.

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G.V.G.V. RTW Spring 2018

After a hiatus of several seasons, the designer known as Mug was back in Tokyo showing a collection heavy on nautical influences. Bold stripes and polka dots, as well as dainty floral prints, were splashed across ladylike skirt suits, ruffled dresses, and voluminous pants. Other details included corset-like lacing and pouf sleeves. While the collection is designed for women, a few male models strutted the runway as well.

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Figue RTW Spring 2018

The crisp awning stripes of Positano merged with the rustic coastal flavor of Trancoso, Brazil in Stephanie von Watzdorf’s spring Figue collection. She kept her signature perennially vacation-ready, bohemian staples fresh with new languid kimonos, the coolest one done in pieces of many vibrant prints and voluminous cotton shirts — some striped, some solid, some a mix of prints — that cutaway almost to a dress length. The kimonos and shirts looked great over printed pajama pants and beachy cotton styles jazzed up with tassels but would work just as well with jeans. For accessories, she introduced a fully beaded moccasin sneaker and slip-on sneakers with decorated with fluffy pom-poms.

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BYO RTW Spring 2018

When he was asked to show his BYO handbags in a runway show a few seasons ago, Jakarta-based accessories designer Tommy Ambiyo jumped at the chance, but he was disappointed to see the accessories taking a backseat to the clothes they were shown with. So he decided to create his own wearable pieces that would showcase, not eclipse, his bags.
The result was eye-catching, if not completely wearable, tops made from the same woven plastic and latex as his handbags. The materials were woven together to create clutches and totes, some simple, and some embellished with plastic paillettes and pieces resembling feathers.
In this case, the tops were a colorful complement to the bags, and Ambiyo kept the rest of the styling minimal, sending out models in the same navy skirts and black pumps, with slicked-back hair and no-makeup makeup.
Ambiyo has found success in is home country, selling more than 6,000 bags in the two years since he relaunched his label. He said the vibrant colors were inspired by the solar eclipse, noting, “During an eclipse you see the craziest colors in the sky.”

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Jeffry Tan RTW Spring 2018

Jakarta-based designer Jeffry Tan is known in Asia for his draped eveningwear inspired by the clean lines of urban architecture. Most of the silhouettes were plays on the bias-cut column dress, several of which he spiced up with diagonal stripes or crisscross straps.
This season, Tan said he was branching out into more streetwear-inspired looks such as slouchy satin trousers, which he paired with sharp-shouldered jackets in silk crepe and satin.
These pieces were more effective than the blousy smocked dresses, which seemed too serious in black yet not formal enough to match the sophistication of the rest of the collection.
While he works in a mostly monochromatic palette, saying, “I’m a bad painter so I’m not good with color,” Tan did have a bright yellow and a fuchsia gown in the lineup. He also used his signature zigzag pattern to add interested to pant legs and side sleeves.
Tan and his fellow Jakarta-based designers were seeking a wider audience in Los Angeles, and many of their evening looks succeeded in generating attention from Hollywood stylists and bloggers.

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Noe Bernacelli RTW Spring 2018

Peruvian designer Noe Bernacelli made his U.S. debut at Los Angeles fashion week, but he’s already well-known in South America and Asia for his glamorous eveningwear. Having studied fashion design in Italy, Bernacelli’s intention when he returned home to found his company seven years ago was to raise the bar for designers in Peru, and the skill of his atelier was apparent in the body-skimming dresses and gowns featuring intricate beading and embroidery over sheer chiffon, mesh and lace. For spring, he stuck with an ivory and gold palette, punctuated by pops of royal blue and dark green. The lineup also featured a handful of well-tailored suits for men, with the same slim silhouettes as his evening gowns. One could easily see these clothes on a Hollywood red carpet — the dresses already populate the society and editorial pages of Hola and Vogue Latin America — and a natural next step would be to translate the already romantic looks into bridal.

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Ines Di Santo Bridal Fall 2018

Ines Di Santo’s runway show at the Appel Room at Lincoln Center, complete with a sprawling New York skyline backdrop, reflected the spirit behind the women who make the vibrant city what it is — cultured and stimulating. The gowns were filled with signature pearls, dramatic silhouettes and beaded embroidery that balanced traditional and modern style.

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Viktor & Rolf Mariage Bridal Fall 2018

“With our Mariage fall 2018 collection we combined our exploration of luxury bridalwear. Our sculptural designs are created with a focus on mingling signature elements such as bows and voluminous tulle, especially crafting a framework that is typically ‘Viktor & Rolf,’” stated a quote from the duo. This season gathered and cascading tulle, as well as 3-D Plexiglas “ice flower” and “glass flower” appliqués were introduced and added a playful attitude to the chic gowns.

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Naeem Khan Bridal Fall 2018

Naeem Khan infused his bridal collection with a bit of Spanish flair via standout ornate veils, delivering plenty of nontraditional ceremony options along the way, including a glittering jumpsuit that opened the show and an embellished cropped top paired with a full skirt. He ended his runway show on a celebratory note, with models clad in swishy mini cocktail numbers dancing in a disco-lit reception.

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Monique Lhuillier Bridal Fall 2018

Monique Lhuillier countered her classically feminine gowns with fashion-forward options like a motorcycle jacket, fur coat and pantsuit for the modern bride looking to balance tradition with a bit of spunk. A collaboration with Pottery Barn — including dinnerware and bed sets — rounded out some necessary items that go toward building a home after the big day.

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Leal Daccarett RTW Spring 2018

For the second Parisian presentation of their brand Leal Daccarett, Colombian designers Karen Daccarett and Francisco Leal offered a flirtatiously Latin collection that steered clear of clichés while tapping into its home country and its layered, dance-filled heritage.
Established in 2008, the brand helmed by the married duo became a fast favorite of the current First Lady of Colombia, María Clemencia De Santos, who was spotted wearing their designs on state visits, most notably to Spain and the U.K.
La Fantástica, their summer line, ranged from bathing suits to floor-length dresses — whether these were exuberant daywear or low-key evening fare was left up to the wearer. With just enough froth to make it fun, the collection had denims adorned with charming character patches or coral pieces; a blue denim set of a long jacket and wide trousers embellished with raw-edged ruffles; tiered dresses in a navy and white palm print, and long caftans. Cottons, silk and denim came together in a palette of blues and whites.
“It’s a proud moment to be Colombian, and we’re showing who we are and how comfortable we are with that,” Leal said during a showroom appointment.

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Maticevski RTW Spring 2018

Inspired by Mies Van der Rohe’s Barcelona Pavillion, Australian designer Toni Maticevski offered a wardrobe of upmarket separates alongside bridal gowns.
The rationale behind this is that he doesn’t want to frame his clothes in either couture or ready-to-wear, because Maticevski advocates a way of dressing in which occasion is of little importance. Case in point: one guest at the show wore one of his pencil skirts with an elaborate flourish down the back, paired with Chuck Taylors and a turtleneck.
So there were new versions of that skirt, floaty blouses, blazers with soft drapes falling down the front alongside long dresses and floor-grazing poof skirts. The palette had an earthy chemical reading, running from coal black to a sulfuric chartreuse, while textures alternated between silk-smooth and roughness — thick weaves, sequined gowns, graphic meshes.
One piece, a structured bodice with trailing chiffon panels, epitomized the designer’s vision: worn with trousers by day, it was a statement at night.

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Johanna Ortiz RTW Spring 2018

Johanna Ortiz chose silk as her primary material for spring, designing the flowery motifs in pinks and reds. The tropics were inspiration, which explained the fanciful golden bugs adorning her dresses.
“It’s Asia, Africa and America coming together,” she said, animated by a rush of excitement from showing her collection at the Colombian Ambassador’s residence in Paris.
She also used embroidery to embellish the formal dresses, many with tiers of ruffles.
It was cocktail hour at teatime; the macarons and truffles sat in the next room, next to a bowl of plantain chips as mint was ground for fresh mojitos. The clothes were appropriate for the stately setting, but perhaps better suited for the evening.
“I love fabrics that feel nice on your skin, I try on all the pieces,” said Ortiz, noting she has to use a stool for the long dresses because she is petite. She was wearing one of her black-and-white silk tunics over jeans, with platform heels for height.
Trenchcoats were another inspiration, evident by the flaps on the front of a polka-dot dress with a ruffled bottom.
The setting for her collection was humbling, Ortiz offered readily, looking up at the painting above her: a fat blue vase of white and

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Arjé RTW Fall 2017

Anyone in the market for a fully reversible shearling that fits like a big hug, look no further than Arjé’s third see-now-buy-now collection from Urban Zen alumni Bessie Afnaim Corral and Oliver Corral. Their his-and-hers styles are what Bessie described as “a gorgeous cloud” of cognac suede and nubby shearling in oversized and slightly snugger fits. The husband-and-wife team focused on a palette of navy, black and camel and luxurious fabrics, such as double-faced cashmere, in silhouettes that are just left of classic. A robe coat had slits up the sleeves to give it a bit of a cape feel and pants were cut with exaggerated bell bottoms. The look could take you from the city to the chalet and the collection will be in store in three weeks — well before before ski season.

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Thom Browne RTW Spring 2018

Thom Browne designed to his Paris moment. “When I thought of doing my first show here, I wanted to celebrate what, in my mind, Paris fashion is all about — the craftsmanship of couture,” he said during a preview.
Browne called his vision of couture “almost childlike,” one represented for spring in a single word: tulle. He thus devised a personal creative challenge: to taking the classic American fabrics he loves – madras, seersucker, checks – and re-create them in a collection made almost entirely of tulle. “Especially for the first show, I wanted a real celebration of the culture of fashion in Paris,” he said. “But then, to make sure that people saw the true connection to what I’ve been doing.”
What this man did with tulle was staggering. In paying homage to couture, he created couture — a collection that would have shown as brilliantly in July as it did on Tuesday at the Hotel de Ville. The mastery of these clothes was beyond, the fabric development remarkable. Imagine a trim madras jacket that looks like real thing, but woven with painstaking precision from strips of tulle. Or a cricket jacket, its half-“exploded,” half-shaved tulle configuration mocking the conservatism of the real thing. Or

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Wendy Jim RTW Spring 2018

The cats were there, but they didn’t walk for the presentation of Austrian label Wendy Jim. They sat on trees, batted hanging balls of yarn or lounged on cushions with the practiced indifference felines are known for. There was meowing on the soundtrack. “The idea came to us when it was reported we would be doing a catwalk. And we wanted to take the Instagram cat hype on,” said Helga Ruthner, one half of the design duo.
Having removed the ampersand from their name as a sign of gender fluidity, she and partner Hermann Fankhauser are making a return after an absence — last season, they’d shown off-schedule. Impeccable shirts, tailored trousers and suit jackets will prove catnip to those who were missing the brand. It is one of their forte, and worn on males and females.
Elsewhere, simple dress shapes and technical sports clothing like chimney neck tops and cycling shorts in acid green Lycra were well executed but charmless.
Ruthner said they’d been concentrating on fit — in clothes as in society’s preconceived boxes. Social proof of countless YouTube videos is that cool cats will make any box fit, and those of Wendy Jim did, albeit with some overhang.

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Alexander McQueen RTW Spring 2018

The fashion bubble. We all know what it means: that from right after Labor Day until whatever date in early October, our lives are consumed by fashion. Sorry, friends; life partners; kids starting school, whether pre-K or college, fashion takes priority, the most important thing.
Only we all know that that’s not really true, that many things are far more important than fashion. Just ask anyone in the industry who was on the show circuit on Sept. 11, 2001. On Monday, a day of unimaginable tragedy in the U.S., Paris Fashion Week went on, the fashion throng assembling for the Alexander McQueen show as the Las Vegas death toll mounted. There’s no good way to transition to a fashion review, but to not acknowledge the event feels wildly uncomfortable.
Backstage before her show, McQueen’s Sarah Burton talked about her desire to deliver an optimistic collection, a notion expressed by a number of designers this season. “So many terrible things happen in the world. We should celebrate people and fashion and creativity,” she said. “I wanted to celebrate beauty and femininity. I wanted to do an uplifting collection.”
And so she did, an exquisite one based on English gardens, specifically the gardens at Great

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Giambattista Valli RTW Spring 2018

Giambattista Valli is the last designer you would expect to channel cross-gender influences on the catwalk, but this season, the king of the frothy ballgown found his masculine edge.
Valli said he was inspired by the love story between Italian artist Mario Schifano and writer Nancy Ruspoli, and how they both changed as a result of their relationship: The Italian princess chopped off her hair, while Schifano took to living in a Renaissance palazzo.
Valli decided to tell the story through clothes, singling out a handful of key items from the painter’s wardrobe — a lozenge-patterned shirt, khaki pants or jeans — and figuring out how to blend them into his ultra-romantic wardrobe. “I’d love to start to enlarge the wardrobe of this Valli woman,” he explained backstage.
The long-sleeved shirts were paired with shrunken knit vests and frilly skirts in a collision of clashing motifs. Floral-patterned pants were softened with a lacy bra top, or a cropped sequined vest with a black lace underlay. Denim appeared in the form of a logo-printed vest, jackets and jeans.
They suggested interesting ways the business could grow in a more casual direction, now that it has a new investor in Artémis, the private fund of the

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