Mens

Robert Cavalli Introduces Triple RRR Fashion Line

Robert Cavalli has been living and breathing fashion all his life. Born in Florence in 1993, the designer is the youngest son of Roberto and Eva Cavalli.
Raised in the U.K., where he studied business marketing at the London School of Arts, Cavalli quickly developed a signature personal style that combines the influences of his family’s heritage with the frisky, underground references of the British cultural scene.
During the 93rd edition of Pitti Uomo, Cavalli, who currently lives in Milan, is making a comeback to his hometown to unveil the first men’s collection of his new brand.
Called Triple RRR — “the letter ‘R’ is definitely part of my life — one R is for Roberto, one for Robert and the other is a lucky charm for more, new things to come,” the designer explained — the fashion label offers an elegant, rich wardrobe for men who like to refresh the sartorial tradition with an edgy, street-wise appeal.

A picture from the Triple RRR exhibit to be hosted in Florence on Jan. 11.
Giovanni Corabi

“This brand was born from a personal need since I couldn’t find the things I wanted to wear in my everyday life in the stores,” said Cavalli. “Also, a lot of people

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Retailers Seek Best-in-Class Brands at Pitti Uomo

Bruce Pask, men’s fashion director, Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus
What specifically are you looking for at Pitti?
Literally everything. Absolutely anything can catch my eye if it is well conceived and crafted, unique in presentation, best of class and, therefore, perfect for our very discerning customer. The great thing about Pitti Uomo is that there is such a vast variety of compelling clothing, sportswear, accessories, leather goods, knitwear that it is incredibly inspiring season after season. It’s a show meant for discovery. The fall edition is especially rich, with beautiful, luxe outerwear and sweaters.
Which brands are you most excited to see?
I always love to see the Brunello Cucinelli collection. It’s beautifully presented and merchandised and walk-throughs with the team — always impeccably turned out in the new collection — and Mr. Cucinelli are inspiring and thoughtful. The Classico Italia section is always compelling and filled with Made in Italy product that is beautifully crafted and presented. I also just really enjoy walking each of the exhibition buildings, scouting booths and looking for anything that may be eye-catching to me and, consequently, our customer. I am always inspired by the special guest designer runway shows and presentations produced during Pitti where they make

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Ones to Watch: Top Picks From Pitti

Corneliani
Elegance, stability, continuity — those are a few of the key values at the core of the Corneliani brand, according to Stefano Gaudioso Tramonte, the company’s general merchandising manager and creative director.
“We are not a pure fashion brand, we are a classic label, which means that we offer beautiful, long-lasting clothes,” he said, explaining the reason behind the company’s decision to present at Pitti rather than hosting its usual fashion show in Milan. “We thought a lot about the value of the show and we realized that for us it was not relevant anymore to concentrate our presentation in the span of 10 minutes since we want to communicate a sense of [continuity].”
After more than a decade, Corneliani is making its comeback at Pitti with a presentation inside Fortezza da Basso’s Sala delle Grotte, a space featuring several rooms connected by archways.
“This space will enable us to create a sort of home, where we can fully unveil our DNA,” said Gaudioso Tramonte. “We will create a sort of exhibition path where guests will immerse themselves in our world.”
Carpets and paintings will enhance the homey feel of the space, which will host different installations where products of the same color will

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M1992 to Make Its Debut at Pitti Uomo

Dorian Stefano Tarantini is making some changes.
The Malibu 1922 designer will unveil a rejiggered fall men’s and women’s collection with a dual-gender runway show at Pitti Uomo on Jan. 11 at the Dogana venue in Florence. And the collection is now being called M1992.
“Malibu 1922 was born three years ago as a video art project and then evolved into a fashion company,” Tarantini explained. “I think the name Malibu was too restrictive because it immediately connected to the Nineties Californian lifestyle. Since the brand is maturing I think we needed a more neutral name and I think this is the right moment to make this move.”
According to the designer, the fall collection will now celebrate the Italian ready-to-wear boom at the end of the Eighties. “That was a great period for Milan with brands such as Erreuno, Genny, Luciano Soprani, Gai Mattiolo…,” Tarantini said, pointing out that the suit will play a key role in the show. “This was definitely the most iconic garment of that period and I think it is also so contemporary.”
The overall fit will reflect the constructed silhouettes of that era with strong shoulders and elongated jackets. “However, everything will be infused with a contemporary, young appeal,” said

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Brooks Brothers to Celebrate 200 Years of Style at Pitti Uomo

When the Pitti Uomo staff suits up for the latest edition of the fair in white button-down shirts, repp ties, American-made jeans, red sweaters and navy puffer jackets emblazoned with a special Brooks Brothers logo, it will be the first hint that something different is going on with the venerable American company. The second clue, even more noticeable, will be an 18-foot-high video sculpture in the shape of a Golden Fleece, the brand’s logo, at the main entrance to the show.
But the big reveal will happen on Wednesday night when the retailer stages a fashion show — its first — in the famed Palazzo Vecchio as the kickoff to the celebration of its 200th anniversary. Following the show, Brooks Brothers will throw the doors open to a special retrospective of its long history, an exhibition that will open to the public the next day.
It’s no coincidence that America’s oldest retailer would choose Florence as the site for the start of its yearlong party. Since 2001, the company has been owned by Claudio Del Vecchio, an Italy-born billionaire businessman and a member of the family that founded and is the majority shareholder of Luxottica.
Del Vecchio said he chose Pitti to start

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What to Watch: Sneaker Chains Constrict

While the demand for sneakers continues to increase, it’s no longer enough to sell them in a run-of-the-mill retail environment.
Larger chains including Foot Locker, which closed 24 U.S. stores in 2017, and Shiekh Shoes, a West Coast retailer with 120 stores that filed for bankruptcy in November, must adapt to a changing consumer who wants to buy special product in a thoughtful space and is inundated with alternative ways to purchase shoes — whether that’s an e-commerce site, specialty boutique, resale app, or a festival and marketplace like ComplexCon or Sneaker Con.
“Today I think we have a few too many sneaker stores in the U.S.,” said Yu-Ming Wu, the cofounder of Sneaker Con. “There is an incredible demand for rare sneakers but when it comes to the general release sneakers like Air Jordans, the supply doesn’t meet the demand. Some of these guys have relied on the old model that every Saturday an Air Jordan is going to sell out, but that’s not always going to hold true today.”
Shiekh Shoes owes $16 million to Nike, and the store’s founder, Shiekh Ellahi, attributes his troubles to the shrinking demand for bricks-and-mortar retailers as well as suppliers’ desire to sell their products

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What to Watch: How Emerging Streetwear Brands Are Navigating 2018

What’s next for streetwear? Critics of the category say the frenzy — see ComplexCon or the crowds that form around Supreme every week — is unsustainable and unhealthy for the market. Newer brands, meanwhile, believe it’s an ideal time to expand their businesses. Here, three young streetwear brands detail how they will approach the year and what they believe is in the pipeline for the category.
424
Guillermo Andrade opened his Los Angeles concept store, FourTwoFour, which is located on Fairfax, in 2010. He sold pieces from Fear of God along with more established firms such as Rick Owens and Thom Browne. By 2014, Andrade started his own line, 424, that’s been picked up by retailers including Barneys New York and SSENSE.
WWD: What do you think about the current state of streetwear?
Guillermo Andrade: It seems to me that it is very positive. The amount of opportunity out there for a young brand like mine is exponential.
WWD: How do you plan on navigating the industry in 2018?
G.A.: Amongst the sea of hype and all the noise around hot brands, there is one thing that cannot be forgotten and that is product is king. I will continue to focus on the product as well

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London Fashion Week Men’s Fall 2018: Ones to Watch

John Alexander Skelton
Born and raised in York, John Alexander Skelton received his master’s in fashion men’s wear at Central Saint Martins and took on internships at E. Tautz and Patrik Ervell before launching his label last year. Selected by Giles Deacon, Skelton is a recipient of the Sarabande scholarship, an initiative from The Lee Alexander McQueen Foundation that aids young designers. He is working out of a studio at Sarabande in east London.
Sustainability is a key theme for Skelton, who incorporates repurposed materials into his ranges and takes a DIY approach to his work. He has a loom in his studio and many of his fabrics are handwoven, as is much of his knitwear. “Everything I dye is also done by hand using natural dye. The handcrafted element is my signature, in a way,” said the designer.
For fall 2018, Skelton has been working with mills in Ireland, mixing British wool and Irish linen.
“I have been doing a lot of hand weaving, as well, on the loom. I have also done a few natural dyes this time, one using an ancient European dye, the European version of indigo, called woad,” he said.
Skelton’s main focus has always been on the process and

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What to Watch: Men’s Market Sees Shift in Areas of Strength

For several years it was ath-leisure that was the biggest buzzword in the men’s wear industry. Now it’s sneakers and streetwear.
As a result, some of the brands that rode the activewear wave have hit a bit of a roadblock, notably Under Armour and Nike.
Once the highest-flying performer in the activewear arena, Under Armour in October posted its first-ever quarterly sales decline, a 5 percent year-over-year drop to $1.4 billion. Profits fell during the quarter as well, with net income totaling $54.2 million, compared with $128.2 million a year ago.
The profits took a hit of $89 million in costs related to a restructuring plan the company revealed in August that is intended to provide more financial and operational flexibility. After bringing in an outsider — former Aldo executive Patrik Frisk as president and chief operating officer — other moves included several hundred layoffs, a new head of women’s and footwear and the discontinuation of the highly touted Tim Coppens-designed UAS high-end fashionable sportswear line. Instead of the Coppens line, Under Armour will now focus on a rotating group of collaborators such as A$AP Rocky, whose collection for the brand is expected to be released later this year.
Founder and chief executive officer Kevin

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What to Watch: Could Men’s-Only Shows Be Terminal?

Could the coed trend wind up killing separate men’s fashion weeks?
That’s the question organizers and industry followers are asking as the latest round of runway shows gets ready to kick off.
The fall 2018 men’s calendar will begin in London this weekend, followed by Milan and then Paris. New York’s men’s shows will bring the season to a close after they wrap up their three-day run Feb. 5 to 7.
Some of the biggest names, both in Europe and the States, are now eschewing men’s-only shows in favor of combining their men’s offering with women’s in one cohesive package.
And so in London, the men’s calendar was wiped of Burberry, JW Anderson and Vivienne Westwood, while in Milan, Roberto Cavalli, Salvatore Ferragamo, Moncler, Gucci, Missoni, Jil Sander and Moschino have all opted to show on the women’s calendar. In Paris, Saint Laurent, Givenchy and Balenciaga all jumped ship, too.
There are exceptions such as Dsquared2, Vetements and Etro, which are sticking with the men’s calendar, and Bottega Veneta, which is actually showing during New York Fashion Week this time to help promote the opening of its new store there.
But perhaps the most vulnerable is the less-established New York Fashion Week: Men’s. Created by the

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Aaron Levant Retires From the Trade Show Business

Aaron Levant is ready for a new challenge. Levant, who founded the Agenda trade show when he was 19, is retiring from the business.
“There wasn’t an exit plan. It wasn’t something that I’ve contemplated for a long time. It’s something I’ve been thinking about for the past two or three months,” said Levant as he was arriving at the final Agenda Long Beach trade show that he will manage in California. “For me, it’s all about continuing to learn new stuff and take on new challenges, and as far as events and trade shows, I’ve learned everything that I can.”
Levant started Agenda, which is dedicated to the skate, surf and streetwear categories, in the back of a Thai restaurant in Long Beach in 2003. In 2013, Reed Exhibitions acquired the show for an undisclosed sum and Levant stayed on to help grow Agenda, oversee other shows and launch new ones.
For the past few years, Levant, who has said he believes the trade show category is dead, has transitioned Agenda from a business-to-business show to a more consumer-facing event. He introduced Agenda Festival last year, which included a two-day trade show followed by a one-day festival that was open to the

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Eclectic to Bring Its French Sensibility to New York City

Franck Malègue has had a long-standing love affair with New York City, so it’s no surprise that he chose Manhattan as the location for his first store outside of Paris.
The owner and designer of Eclectic, a men’s outerwear brand, will open a 1,600-square-foot store at 27 Greene Street, next to The Webster, early next year. It will join his two shops in Paris, in Le Marais and off the Avenue Montaigne, and a concession shop at Le Bon Marché.
The Paris-born Malègue started Eclectic in 2011 after spending several years in brand development for cosmetics, accessories and ready-to-wear companies. The tight collection of coats and jackets blends traditional designs with high-tech materials in a line he describes as “active tailoring,” or “tailored urbanwear” that “bridges together durability, functionality and elegance.”
Eclectic offers just 18 styles and each piece uses a canvas interlining in the front panels and lapels to give the garments shape and employs technical fibers and fabrics such as Cordura, Airnet, bi-stretch cotton and microfibers to provide wind- and water-repellency, stretch and other properties for today’s active man. One example is a sport coat in a 3-D mesh that Nike uses for its shoes.
“These are things today’s man wants, especially

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Billy Reid Reflects on 20 Years in Fashion

NEW YORK — Billy Reid could be a case study in resilience.
Since he created the first William Reid collection in March 1998, the soft-spoken Southern designer has experienced more than his share of ups and downs.
The ups: He has built his Southern-flavored Americana designer collection into a successful wholesale business at Neiman Marcus, Saks Fifth Avenue and Nordstrom and 13 of his own Billy Reid stores. He’s also won four Council of Fashion Designers of America awards.
The downs: His initial foray into fashion, William Reid, failed following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, driving the designer and his family from New York back to his home state of Alabama.
But despite the roller coaster that has defined his career, Reid is happy to be at the helm of a $25 million brand as he prepares to celebrate his 20th anniversary next year.
“Failure? I’ve been there,” Reid said, sitting on a chair in his showroom on Bond Street here. “Losing everything overnight was so humbling, but it makes you realize what’s important to you and that you can recover.”
Reid’s story begins in the small town of Amite, La., where his mother owned a women’s boutique called T.J.’s for Her that operated out of

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Gildo Zegna on the Growth of Asia, Being CEO

NEW DELHI — This has been another milestone year for Gildo Zegna, since he is marking two decades as Ermenegildo Zegna’s chief executive officer.
In addition, 2017 represents 10 years since the Italian men’s wear brand entered the Indian market, which Zegna described on a visit here as of “key strategic importance” while surveying the country’s changing retail landscape and speaking to students at the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, about the challenges of a family-owned business.
The ceo has begun to institute a new brand strategy over the last year; changed design direction under creative director Alessandro Sartori, who joined in June 2016; is excited about innovations like tech-merino and pelle tesuto, and has a continued focus on bringing in Millennials to the brand.
This year, close to 50 percent of the Zegna group’s turnover will come from the Asian market.
In an exclusive interview with WWD, Zegna talked about the allure of Asian markets while adding both prophecy and insight to his 20 years at the helm.
WWD: This year you mark 20 years as a chief executive officer of the Ermenegildo Zegna Group. Do you feel invigorated by the milestone? Or burnt out?
Gildo Zegna: I have lasted long. Usually a chief executive officer lasts

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Copdate Aims to Make Sneaker Releases More Democratic

Andrew Raisman, who used to own the Montreal-based Fidel Clothing, wanted to merge his love of sneakers with his app development experience, so he launched Copdate, an app that allows customers to reserve a digital spot in line for sneaker releases instead of camping out on the street.
“We wanted to address issues in the sneaker world from the consumer and retail side,” said Raisman. “Sneaker releases are presenting pain points for the entire industry.”
The Copdate app works like this: customers download the app, follow participating retailers on the app — Copdate partners with mostly specialty sneaker retailers including Extra Butter, Proper, Packer and Burn Rubber — and users will receive a notification when reservations for releases become available. The user can then cop the item and if they win, they will be notified with a reservation number, which they use to pick up the sneakers in the store. Raisman said using Copdate does not guarantee that the customer will obtain the shoes, but it can make the pool of interested buyers smaller by limiting the raffle to certain geographic locations.
“The cycle of a sneaker release is something like this: the shoe is leaked, then it’s seeded to celebrities,” said Raisman.

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Copdate Aims to Make Sneaker Releases More Democratic

Andrew Raisman, who used to own the Montreal-based Fidel Clothing, wanted to merge his love of sneakers with his app development experience, so he launched Copdate, an app that allows customers to reserve a digital spot in line for sneaker releases instead of camping out on the street.
“We wanted to address issues in the sneaker world from the consumer and retail side,” said Raisman. “Sneaker releases are presenting pain points for the entire industry.”
The Copdate app works like this: customers download the app, follow participating retailers on the app — Copdate partners with mostly specialty sneaker retailers including Extra Butter, Proper, Packer and Burn Rubber — and users will receive a notification when reservations for releases become available. The user can then cop the item and if they win, they will be notified with a reservation number, which they use to pick up the sneakers in the store. Raisman said using Copdate does not guarantee that the customer will obtain the shoes, but it can make the pool of interested buyers smaller by limiting the raffle to certain geographic locations.
“The cycle of a sneaker release is something like this: the shoe is leaked, then it’s seeded to celebrities,” said Raisman.

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Cremieux Opens Second U.S. Store, Creates New Label for Dillard’s

Cremieux has embarked on a dual-pronged growth strategy as it works to increase sales.
The French brand, which got its start in Saint-Tropez in 1976, has opened its second store in the U.S. and has also created a new contemporary men’s brand for Dillard’s, its longtime American retail partner.
On Dec. 1, Cremieux opened an 800-square-foot boutique at the Royal Poinciana Plaza in Palm Beach, Fla. This joins the company’s SoHo store on Mercer Street that opened nearly four years ago.
A Florida store has long been on the wish list for Stephane Cremieux, chief executive officer of Cremieux and son of founder Daniel Cremieux. “Ever since the brand was founded, we wanted to open a store in Florida,” he said. “So when this opportunity came up, we took it.”
He said the recently renovated Royal Poinciana center is “a special place” with a curated assortment of luxury brands. “You can’t call it a mall. It’s like being in a summer house with fountains, lots of green and palm trees.” The center is home to 30 stores including Cynthia Rowley, Hermès, Magasin, Orlebar Brown and Serenella.
The design of the Cremieux store is very reminiscent of Saint-Tropez, he said, with photos of the French Riviera and

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Cremieux Opens Second U.S. Store, Creates New Label for Dillard’s

Cremieux has embarked on a dual-pronged growth strategy as it works to increase sales.
The French brand, which got its start in Saint-Tropez in 1976, has opened its second store in the U.S. and has also created a new contemporary men’s brand for Dillard’s, its longtime American retail partner.
On Dec. 1, Cremieux opened an 800-square-foot boutique at the Royal Poinciana Plaza in Palm Beach, Fla. This joins the company’s SoHo store on Mercer Street that opened nearly four years ago.
A Florida store has long been on the wish list for Stephane Cremieux, chief executive officer of Cremieux and son of founder Daniel Cremieux. “Ever since the brand was founded, we wanted to open a store in Florida,” he said. “So when this opportunity came up, we took it.”
He said the recently renovated Royal Poinciana center is “a special place” with a curated assortment of luxury brands. “You can’t call it a mall. It’s like being in a summer house with fountains, lots of green and palm trees.” The center is home to 30 stores including Cynthia Rowley, Hermès, Magasin, Orlebar Brown and Serenella.
The design of the Cremieux store is very reminiscent of Saint-Tropez, he said, with photos of the French Riviera and

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Southern Tide Signs Neckwear License With Harry Bachrach

Southern Tide, a Greenville, S.C.-based sportswear brand best known for its Skipjack Polo shirt, is expanding into neckwear.
The brand, now a division of Oxford Industries, has signed a multiyear licensing deal with Harry Bachrach, a weaving and design company, to create neckwear and pocket squares. The first product will be available for the spring 2018 season.

“Harry Bachrach understands our aesthetic and color sense, offers quality product and knows what the market needs,” said Christopher Heyn, chief executive officer of Southern Tide. “The market is ready to have fun with neckwear again.”

The neckwear collection will complement the brand’s other products and will offer a variety of prints and patterns in colorful designs in both long ties and bow ties. The collection will be sold by Harry Bachrach’s line of independent sales representatives and targeted to specialty stores around the country.

“Harry Bachrach is honored to be working with such a great brand as Southern Tide,” said Michael Mone, ceo of Harry Bachrach. “We take a lot of pride in our work and when a brand like Southern Tide taps our company to be its manufacturing partner, we take our role very seriously. Harry Bachrach sources the finest fabrics globally and designs some of

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Southern Tide Signs Neckwear License With Harry Bachrach

Southern Tide, a Greenville, S.C.-based sportswear brand best known for its Skipjack Polo shirt, is expanding into neckwear.
The brand, now a division of Oxford Industries, has signed a multiyear licensing deal with Harry Bachrach, a weaving and design company, to create neckwear and pocket squares. The first product will be available for the spring 2018 season.

“Harry Bachrach understands our aesthetic and color sense, offers quality product and knows what the market needs,” said Christopher Heyn, chief executive officer of Southern Tide. “The market is ready to have fun with neckwear again.”

The neckwear collection will complement the brand’s other products and will offer a variety of prints and patterns in colorful designs in both long ties and bow ties. The collection will be sold by Harry Bachrach’s line of independent sales representatives and targeted to specialty stores around the country.

“Harry Bachrach is honored to be working with such a great brand as Southern Tide,” said Michael Mone, ceo of Harry Bachrach. “We take a lot of pride in our work and when a brand like Southern Tide taps our company to be its manufacturing partner, we take our role very seriously. Harry Bachrach sources the finest fabrics globally and designs some of

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Stefano Pilati to Unveil Exhibition at Pitti Uomo in June

MILAN — Stefano Pilati will unveil an exhibition at the 94th edition of international men’s wear trade show Pitti Uomo in June.
Titled “Evolution — Involution — Revolution. Three decades of men’s fashion as seen by Stefano Pilati,” the exhibit at Florence’s Palazzo Pitti is to highlight the tight links between fashion and the constantly changing world surrounding it.
The show, which will be inaugurated during Pitti Uomo and remain open to the public until Oct. 21, represents the third chapter of the three-year program promoted by the Florentine Center for Italian fashion, Galleria degli Uffizi and Pitti Immagine. The Italian Ministry of Economic Development and Italian trade agency ICE will also support the project with a financial contribution.
“For this project focused on men’s fashion, a theme which has been neglected for too long on the Italian and international cultural scenes, we chose Stefano Pilati because he is one of its main protagonists,” said Pitti Discovery Foundation general secretary Lapo Cianchi. “But most of all, we got fascinated by his personal vision of the fashion system: eccentric, dissonant, almost cynical. He has a precise point of view, which reflects the obsessions and considerations of a collector, who is also a designer and someone who

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