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Brooks Brothers to Kick Off 200th Anniversary at Pitti Uomo

Brooks Brothers will kick off the celebration of its 200th anniversary in the home country of its owner, Italy.
The venerable retailer will be partnering with the Pitti Uomo show in Florence, where it will stage its first-ever runway show on Jan. 10.
The show will be at the Salone dei Cinquecento in the historical Palazzo Vecchio, which will also be the site of a comprehensive retrospective from Brooks Brothers’ archives. The special exhibition will then be open to the public from Jan. 11 to 14.
“Our anniversary marks a significant and historic milestone not only for Brooks Brothers but also for the fashion industry,” said Claudio Del Vecchio, chairman and chief executive officer of Brooks Brothers. “This is a moment to celebrate 200 years steeped in both tradition and innovation.”
He added that Pitti Uomo “is the global platform for the men’s wear industry and Brooks Brothers proudly accepted the invitation to celebrate our bicentennial this year.”
Raffaello Napoleone, ceo of Pitti Immagine, parent of Pitti Uomo, said the show was honored that Brooks Brothers chose Pitti Uomo as the kick-off of its yearlong celebration.
“Brooks Brothers will be the special event at this coming edition of the fair: an occasion marking the 200 years

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In the Spotlight: Thomas Finney’s Modern Take on Made-to-Measure

Designer: Thomas Finney
Backstory: The Michigan native initially thought his career path would lead to the film industry. But once he got immersed in the Savannah College of Art and Design, he switched gears to fashion design, with a focus on men’s wear. He scored an internship with Thom Browne and so impressed the designer that he was hired to be a full-time men’s designer for the label after graduation. He stayed at his “dream job” for four years, working on both the commercial and runway collections, before leaving for a short stint working with Aaron Levine at Club Monaco. “I went from high concept to high street,” he said. About 18 months ago, he took the plunge and launched his own eponymous label, zeroing in on tailored clothing and furnishings.
Aesthetic: Finney admits to a love for Americana and based his silhouette off of a Forties golfing jacket. His ability to combine old-school tailoring techniques with new technology results in a slim, modern cut that is comfortable and easy to wear. In addition to suits, Finney has also created an entire day-to-night wardrobe ranging from denim with a suede crotch — “Yes, I went there.”— to leather jackets and knitwear.
Distribution: Despite

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Grailed Extends Beyond Secondhand Shopping

“I see too many tweets about kids getting their phone taken away because they are using Grailed,” said Arun Gupta, a lanky 29-year-old who speaks as if he’s being timed for speed.
Gupta, who studied physics at Yale, is the chief executive officer and cofounder of Grailed, the men’s resale site that launched in 2014.
Last week, Grailed’s Twitter mentions were particularly pointed. The e-commerce site released an update to its iPhone mobile app and there were a few glitches. Users were upset about a missing “back” and “done” button, the inability to add pictures to a listing and not being able to send messages to other users.
App glitches that prevent customers from purchasing or selling product are a problem, but the mentions, which ranged from obnoxious to highly concerned, were indicative of Grailed’s connection to its user, who is typically male, between ages 17 and 35 and has a penchant for streetwear and high-end designers. The site isn’t as omnipresent as, say, Instagram, but it’s quickly become a resource and daily attraction for a demographic that most retailers and brands are trying to win over.
Grailed, which is a term used to describe a highly sought-after item — derived from holy grail

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The Tie Bar to Make Madison Avenue Store Permanent

The Tie Bar is putting down permanent stakes in New York.
The Chicago-based men’s accessories brand opened a pop-up shop at 400 Madison Avenue in May that was originally expected to be open for only six months. But the success of the location, which is between 47th and 48th Streets, prompted the brand to make it the company’s first permanent store in the city.
“New York continues to be a rapidly growing market for us, so to maintain a permanent store presence here was a must,” said Allyson Lewis, chief executive officer of The Tie Bar. “Our now family of stores has proven extremely effective for the brand, exposing us to a new regional clientele.”
The brand, which offers neckwear, dress shirts, socks, pocket square, ties bars and other accessories, also has a store in Chicago and recently opened a unit in Boston. Both of those locations also got their start as pop-ups.
According to the company, the brand expects to expand to several other “key markets” in 2018. Specific cities were not disclosed, but a spokesman said The Tie Bar is looking at the East and West Coasts as well as in parts of the South.
The Madison Avenue location was the company’s third

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Independents’ Day: Mr. Sid Celebrates a Half-Century in Suburban Boston

The story begins when Sid Segel opened a small tuxedo rental business in suburban Boston. His sons, Ira and Robert, used that business as the seed to open Mr. Sid in 1967.
Today, that small shop has morphed into a 10,000-square-foot upscale men’s store in Newton Centre, Mass., that is run by Sid’s grandsons Stuart and Barry. The brothers, whose late father Ira was an institution in the men’s wear industry until his death in 2015, celebrated the milestone with a black-tie event last week. Later this month, the Segels will take the plunge and open a second store in downtown Boston in the newly developed Seaport district.
Here, Stuart Segel talks about the anniversary, the planned expansion and the qualities that have enabled Mr. Sid to survive.
WWD: Managing to survive as an independent retailer for 50 years is quite an accomplishment. How did the business get its start?
Stuart Segel: My grandfather, Sid, had a tuxedo rental business and had a branch in Newton Centre. My father and uncle opened their business on Sept. 25, 1967, and eventually it transformed into this. They decided to call it Mr. Sid because back then a name meant a lot for credit purposes. My uncle

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At Work: Simon Mitchell, Retail Architect

LONDON — London-based architect Simon Mitchell was exposed to design at an early age, having grown up with a mother who was a seamstress and a father who worked in the printing trade. After winning a design competition in his hometown of Exeter, England, which singled him out as “Architect of the Future” at age eight, Mitchell went on to specialize in retail architecture and to cofound the architectural firm Sybarite — whose name alludes to his and his partner Torquil McIntosh’s love of good food and good wine.
Sybarite is behind the design concepts of stores such as Marni, Joseph and, most recently, the new SKP department store in Beijing, China.
“We have worked on more than 2,000 retail locations in the last 15 years; that could be from a shop-in-shop to a flagship boutique to a department store. So I’ve been exposed to hundreds and hundreds of brands and cultures,” said Mitchell, highlighting his firm’s approach of customizing each store design to represent the ethos of the brand rather than developing his own signature style. “What we want to do is reflect the brand and its consumer in a new way and create innovative concepts, so that the consumer understands the

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Why Supreme Opened a Second New York Store

NEW YORK — After more than 20 years of being in business, Supreme’s Manhattan store was beginning to bust at the seams.
The streetwear brand had alleviated the lines and crowds with a new release system — customers no longer need to camp out as they put their name on a list and enter the store during a designated time slot — but demand for the product has continued to increase, which is why the team opted for a 3,000-square-foot store in Brooklyn at 152 Grand Street between Bedford Avenue and Berry Street. On Thursday morning, when the shop opened to the public, Mayor Bill De Blasio commemorated the occasion by cutting the ribbon, which was appropriately covered with the Supreme logo.
“The truth is we maxed out on the Manhattan space. We were at capacity,” said Angelo Baque, Supreme’s former brand director who started his own creative agency but still oversees art direction for the company. “We couldn’t serve any more customers or sell more items.”
The new, larger space follows Supreme’s retail formula: wooden fixtures, sparse merchandising that lines the perimeter of the store, a flat screen playing skate videos in the window and a couple of concrete blocks for seating. The

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Joseph Abboud to Dress NHL Coaches in Custom Suits

The coaches in the National Hockey League can thank Joseph Abboud for their wardrobe upgrade this season.
Thanks to a new two-year agreement with the National Hockey League Coaches Association, the 20 head coaches will all be outfitted in Abboud custom suits for the 2017-18 season that kicks off today.
As part of the deal, the coaches were measured at various Men’s Wearhouse stores nationwide and were able to select from over 150 fabric swatches, various silhouettes and range of style options. Each coach will receive 10 Joseph Abboud custom suits and ties for the season.
Ken Hitchcock, head coach for the Dallas Stars, said: “When you have 82 games a season, it’s important to look professional and have confidence on the sidelines. We’re honored to have this partnership with an American designer, with American-made product.”
In addition, the coaches will participate in the annual Men’s Wearhouse National Suit Drive in July where the company partners with 170 non-profit organizations to donate gently used professional clothing for Americans transitioning back into the workforce. Each coach will donate a piece of professional clothing to a Men’s Wearhouse store that month. “It’s important to give back to the community and this is a great way to help Americans

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Russell Westbrook Collaborates With Tumi

After working together earlier this year on its 19 Degree campaign, Tumi and Russell Westbrook have partnered again to create a capsule collection, which will be available on Thursday.
“This is something quite interesting where Russell is an amazing athlete, but he’s also a fashion icon in the NBA and outside of the NBA,” said Victor Sanz, Tumi’s creative director. “He has been this loyal Tumi customer for years and years, and we thought we should do something together beyond the ad campaign.”
Westbrook worked with Tumi to update products in its existing assortment. The Tumi x Westbrook collection, which ranges from $55 to $795, includes a carry-on bag, a double expansion travel satchel, the Morrison and Warren backpacks, a jetsetter tote, a hanging travel kit and the Westbrook Dangler. Each piece features “Why Not?” which is Westbrook’s mantra.

Russell Westbrok x Tumi

“I couldn’t be more excited to collaborate with Tumi, a brand that I have been a loyal user of for years,” Westbrook said. “I’ve always enjoyed the process of transforming an idea through the design process, and the creative team at Tumi really executed my vision. I’m proud to share the functional and stylistic collection we’ve created together with people all

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Supreme Confirms Brooklyn Store

NEW YORK — Supreme has landed in Brooklyn.
After months of speculation, the company has confirmed that it will open a store on Thursday at 152 Grand Street in Williamsburg.
The cavernous space is sparse, much like Supreme’s other shops, but features skylights and a bowl for skating. This is the brand’s second New York store.
Resellers say rumors of a Brooklyn store have been percolating for a few years because of the crowds Supreme draws at its SoHo store on Thursdays when new product drops, but talks started to dissipate once the company created a drop system that alleviated those crowds on Lafayette Street. Customers now meet in a park the Monday before Thursday drops and put their names on a list. They then receive a number that dictates when they can enter the flagship, eliminating the need for a line.
In July, Louis Vuitton had to cancel its Supreme pop-up on Bond Street because Manhattan’s Community Board No. 2 unanimously denied the proposal, citing Supreme’s tendency to violate New York permit requirements and its lack of a plan to manage the crowds on a quiet, residential street. The collection was never released in New York.
While Williamsburg has transitioned from a neighborhood for

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Brett Johnson to Open Store in New York

Brett Johnson is taking the plunge into retail.
The designer, who launched his eponymous men’s wear collection in 2013, will open his first store in SoHo on Thursday.
The unit at 109 Mercer Street between Prince and Spring Streets, will have 1,600 square feet of selling space and around 1,400 square feet devoted to showrooms and offices. There will be a soft opening this week and a grand-opening party is scheduled for Oct. 12.
Johnson, who was formerly based in Virginia, has relocated to New York to be closer to the business.
“For us, it’s just easier to control everything from out of the store,” he said. “Our clientele is primarily based in New York, so it just made sense.”
Johnson, the son of Black Entertainment Television founders Robert and Sheila Johnson, got his start designing his own interpretation of the Nike Air Force One sneakers and then branched out into apparel. The Brett Johnson line of outerwear, knitwear, woven shirts and trousers are all manufactured in Florence.
The collection has been sold at Neiman Marcus as well as a handful of specialty stores in the U.S. He said the best-selling items are outerwear and knitwear, but the store will also offer made-to-measure, a category that

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Perry Ellis Partners With Amazon Alexa

Perry Ellis is tapping into the voice activation market.
The men’s wear brand has teamed with Amazon to create an “Ask Perry Ellis” skill, or a set of built-in capabilities, that works with the voice-activated Amazon Alexa device to offer styling suggestions for various occasions.
“Over the years, we’ve seen men’s dressing habits evolve from wearing clothes for one specific occasion to the need to wear clothes for many different occasions,” said Melissa Worth, Perry Ellis’ president, before presenting the new technology on Thursday morning at The Standard Hotel in New York’s East Village. “At Perry Ellis, we are committed to providing solutions that are going to help him feel comfortable, look stylish and be appropriately dressed for any occasion on his calendar.”
According to Worth, after surveying a group of men, the team at Perry Ellis found that 81 percent of them had challenges getting dressed and 45 percent said the biggest struggle was getting dressed for a specific event and making sure they were appropriately dressed.
Perry Ellis is hoping to remedy this with “Ask Perry Ellis,” which allows men to ask Alexa what to wear for a particular event — the skill is programmed to respond to 150 different occasions ranging

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The Family Behind Weatherproof Launches the Very Warm Project

Cousins Shai and David Peyser are helping their family, which owns outerwear brand Weatherproof, establish a bigger presence in the contemporary category.
They have partnered to introduce The Very Warm, a men’s and women’s outerwear line that will launch for fall. Each season, the brand will partner with artists to incorporate one-of-a-kind artwork into its products.
“I came into the business a couple of years ago and we decided to do something that was art inspired,” Shai Peyser said. “We wanted to start a conversation with outerwear and a way to do that is with the lining. I personally have a love for art and street art so we are incorporating that into the lining.”
For the first season, The Very Warm has tapped artists Trav, Jasper Wong, Morgan Lappin and Caleb Troy to create pieces for the lining. The collection includes coach jackets, reversible bombers and quilted parkas and retails from $189 to $375.
The line is being sold at Nordstrom, and beginning in October, the brand will host a three-month pop-up shop within Odin’s SoHo location in New York. The pop-up will include events every few weeks hosted by artists who have collaborated with the brand.
The Very Warm has also worked with NBALab,

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H&M Finds Success With The Weeknd Partnership

The Weeknd, whose birth name is Abel Tesfaye, is continuing his partnership with H&M.
For his first collection, which was released in March, Tesfaye selected items from H&M’s men’s collection. But for the new line he’s worked with the design team to create new pieces.
“Once again I’ve selected my favorite pieces from H&M’s collection, and because we’re moving into fall I’ve put the focus on sweats and hoodies. I was so happy with the first collection that I wanted to put my stamp on the pieces even more,” said Tesfaye. “We’ve been much more playful with the logos and graphics on many of the pieces, and I love the sense of identity that runs through the collection.”
The 18-piece line includes sweatshirts, jackets, hoodies, bomber jackets, varsity jackets and parkas covered in graphics, logos and messaging that’s related to the artist. The line is available now online and within stores.
“We worked very closely with him and one of his art directors who gave us a few ideas on prints and graphics,” said Andreas Lowenstam, head of men’s wear design at H&M. “But we wanted to separate this from his tour merchandise.”
Tesfaye has a line of merchandise he releases while he’s on tour,

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Duck Head to Be Relaunched Under Oxford Industries

Just over a year ago, Oxford Industries quietly bought the Duck Head trademark. But at the end of this month, the Atlanta-based manufacturer is going to make some noise as it relaunches the venerable men’s wear brand.
“There’s a lot of resonance with this brand,” said Wesley Howard, president of Oxford’s Lanier Clothes division, which is spearheading the return of the Duck Head label. ”It speaks to the authority of the brand — there’s a lot of emotional connection.”
Duck Head traces its history to 1865 when two Nashville brothers, George and Joe O’Bryan, turned duck — heavy canvas used for Army tents — into sturdy work pants and overalls. The company’s pants with their mallard logo became a wardrobe staple and were especially popular in the South. The company changed hands several times over the years and in 2013 was sold to Prospect Brands LLC, a joint venture between apparel industry veteran Tom Nolan and McCarthy Capital Fund V, an Omaha-based private equity firm. Although Prospect had big plans to revitalize the brand, they were never realized and Nolan resigned as president and chief executive officer early last year.
For the past year, Howard, along with former Tommy Bahama ceo Terry Pillow,

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Ralph Lauren Embraces Streetwear Distribution Model

The scene outside Ralph Lauren’s Prince Street store in Manhattan’s SoHo last Thursday was reminiscent of the crowds that routinely occupy particular blocks in New York awaiting the release of a sneaker or a hyped streetwear collection. But there were some differences. These customers were decidedly older and camera-shy — one evaded WWD’s photographer stating, “I’m supposed to be at work.” They were also wholly devoted to Ralph Lauren and many of them wore full looks from the designer, which they’ve been purchasing since they were teens.
After months of rumors surrounding the re-release of the Polo Stadium collection, one of Lauren’s most admired lines, the company finally confirmed on its Instagram account that it would be reissuing a limited-edition capsule of old and new styles to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the assortment. The line was first launched in 1992 and drew from the Olympic Summer Games. The capsule featured 12 styles including a popover, which retails for $195; a marsh coat, which retails for $495; a fitted cap, $50, and a polo that sells for $125.
Customers were instructed to show up at select Ralph Lauren locations on Sept. 19 to get a numbered wrist band that would allow them to

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Karmaloop Founder Greg Selkoe Launches Wanderset E-Commerce Site

Greg Selkoe, Karmaloop’s founder, has a new e-commerce proposition.
Selkoe has teamed with Wil Eddins, co-owner of Institution 18b in Las Vegas, and Matthew Growney, cofounder of Fabulous Brands who used to work for Karmaloop, to introduce Wanderset, a men’s e-commerce site that’s content heavy and features merchandising from cultural influencers.
This isn’t completely new territory for Selkoe. In 2016, he started Curateurs, a men’s online retail concept highlighting cultural influencers who sold pieces from their closets. In order to better scale the business, Curateurs was folded into LookLive, a site that aggregates pictures of celebrities’ outfits and allows readers to shop for the pieces or more affordable versions via affiliate links.
Selkoe, who had to leave LookLive after being diagnosed with sarcoidosis, which kept him sick for close to a year, said Wanderset operates from a different model. As opposed to offering one-off items from celebrities’ personal collections, Wanderset is a fully stocked e-commerce site that sells merchandise from brands including Android Homme, Carrots, Comme des Garçons, Dead Studios, Del Toro Shoes, En Noir, Gucci Ghost, Lacoste and Mr. Completely.
On Wanderset influencers are called set members and have a set page that features merchandise from their own brands or select pieces from

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Moods of Norway Files for Bankruptcy

Moods of Norway, the brightly colored European fashion brand, has filed for bankruptcy.
“It’s incomprehensibly sad that the adventure is now over,” Moods of Norway founder Simen Staalnacke told Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK) after he revealed the bankruptcy filing to employees. “We have really tried to make this work. I feel like words aren’t enough in such an extreme situation.”
The brand, which started in men’s wear but moved into women’s, hasn’t done well in the past few years; earlier this week its lead bank, Sparebanken Sogn og Fjordane, stopped further credit, and Moods of Norway hasn’t been able to raise new capital. Last year Varner, a Norwegian apparel chain, bought 25 percent of the company, but that infusion of cash couldn’t turn things around.
For the past few years, Moods of Norway, which was started in 2002, has been in expansion mode, which ultimately led to its profitability challenges.
In 2012, the company hired George Santacroce, an industry veteran whose prior stints included Bergdorf Goodman and Aquascutum of London, to build up the U.S. business. Shortly after that, it tapped Keanan Duffty as a design consultant. At its height Moods of Norway operated 15 stores worldwide. For now, the stores are still open.
For more

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Cockpit USA Collaborates With Stylist Mike B.

Mike B., whose real name is Mike Barnett, has teamed with Cockpit USA, the heritage outerwear brand.
For Barnett, a celebrity stylist whose client list includes A$AP Ferg, Sean Combs, the Migos and Swizz Beatz, this partnership is a full-circle moment.
He met Jacky Clyman, the owner of Cockpit USA, in the Nineties via fax and e-mail while working on The Bad Boy Entertainment leather jackets that Avirex, which was once owned by Cockpit USA, produced. They met again in New York and Barnett pitched his brand concept to Clyman, who obliged.
“During the Nineties, Avirex and Cockpit helped hip-hop culture in terms of outerwear. If you follow hip-hop, there are different eras of leather jackets. In the late 2000s, it was all about having a good Avirex or Cockpit bomber.”
Barnett has worked with the Cockpit design team to create a collection of outerwear, which includes a G1 Top Gun bomber with a removable collar, a shearling coat and a longer shearling style with a belt. The coats, which retail from $900 to $2,100, are all black with Cockpit’s signature map lining. The capsule is available now on Cockpit’s e-commerce site and Mike B.’s site.

Barnett is also launching his own line, Bogard by

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George Zimmer Acquires Competing Online Tuxedo Rental Brand

George Zimmer is building his empire.
Generation Tux, the online tuxedo rental business founded in 2014 by the gravelly voiced founder of Men’s Wearhouse has acquired a competing business called Menguin in a stock exchange deal worth $25 million.
As part of the deal, Menguin has relocated to Louisville, Ky., the headquarters of Generation Tux, and its chief executive officer, Justin Delaney, will become president of both brands, which will continue to be run as separate businesses. His cofounder Bogdan Constantin will serve as chief marketing officer.
“I met these guys about a year ago and they had a small company that was doing about the same volume we do,” Zimmer said. “But the difference was that we invested many millions more than they did. They built their business on old-fashioned hard work and knowledge.”

George Zimmer
Joshua Scott

The four-year-old Menguin has been experiencing a compound annual growth rate of 800 percent. Generation Tux expects to have sales next year of between $20 million and $30 million.
He said the number of rentals and revenue of the two companies was similar, but the expense structure at Generation Tux is much higher. One marked difference is that Menguin did not own its rental inventory while Generation Tux does.

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Bruce Pask Adds Neiman Marcus to Men’s Duties

Bruce Pask has gotten a bump up in duties.
The men’s director of Bergdorf Goodman has expanded his responsibilities to include oversight of Neiman Marcus as well. Effective immediately, his new title is men’s fashion director, Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus.
In this role, Pask will be responsible for setting the tone for the men’s fashion area for both businesses.
He will continue to report to Kenneth Gaston, vice president and general merchandise manager for men’s at Bergdorf Goodman, as well Russ Patrick, senior vice president and gmm of men’s, for Neiman Marcus.
The last person to oversee both store banners was Matthew Singer, who left the company in 2013. Ken Downing, senior vice president and fashion director of Neiman Marcus, will continue in that role.
“Bruce is highly respected in the global fashion industry and it is our great pleasure to have him expand his men’s fashion oversight to both the Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus brands,” said Jim Gold, president and chief merchandising officer for Neiman Marcus Group.
Pask started his career in editorial, working at GQ Magazine, Cargo Magazine and T Magazine, where he served as men’s fashion director. He has also worked as a freelance stylist and fashion editor on campaigns for

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