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The Aftermath: Stylist Law Roach on Creating Celine Dion’s BBMAs Moment

Celebrity stylist Law Roach first met Celine Dion at the 2016 Billboard Music Awards. A fan of her music, he went to her dressing room postshow and made quite the impression — Dion called him the next day to ask if he would travel to Paris to be with her for a month. A month turned into a year and things came full circle on Sunday, when Roach styled Dion for this year’s awards show.
Dion delivered an emotionally charged performance of “My Heart Will Go On” in honor of the 20th anniversary of the film “Titanic.” Standing underneath a giant chandelier, the songstress wore a white gown by Stéphane Rolland that featured dramatic shoulders and a plunging neckline.
“If someone asked me if there was a dress that embodied who Celine was, it would have to be that dress,” shares Roach. “Not only was it elegant, but it was so much drama. I knew in my heart of hearts that that would be the dress.”

Celine Dion in her Stéphane Rolland gown backstage at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards.
Courtesy Photo

Roach reveals that he reached out to Rolland on a whim after running into some difficulty with designers due to the Cannes Film Festival. Rolland agreed to send Roach two dresses, and Roach

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Life After Downton Abbey: Joanne Froggatt Goes Dark

“She actually killed more people than Jack the Ripper,” says Joanne Froggatt, from a table at the Breslin in Manhattan. She’s speaking of her latest character, Mary Ann Cotton, who was Britain’s first-known female serial killer between the 1860s and 1870s, responsible for close to 20 murders.
To hear such words come out of Froggatt’s mouth is a mild shock for any “Downton Abbey” viewer, who will be accustomed to seeing the 36-year-old English actress as the gentle, loveable Anna on the hit show.
Froggatt is back to period British cinema as of Sunday, in the Masterpiece movie “Dark Angel.”
“Nobody’s ever heard of her,” Froggatt says. “Jack the Ripper is very visceral, dark — like an urban myth kind of legend. Whereas people didn’t want to believe, at the time, that Mary Ann Cotton had done these terrible things, I think, because people didn’t want to believe that a woman is capable of that.”
Here, Froggatt talks more about the character — and serial killers.
WWD: What made “Dark Angel,” the right project to follow up “Downton” with?
Joanne Froggatt: After doing “Downton,” people kept saying to me, “Oh, what do you want to do next?” and I jokingly kept saying, “I want to

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Jessica Chastain Talks Cannes Jury Duty

Will Smith is already up to mischief just days into his role on the jury of the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, according to fellow jury member Jessica Chastain. In an exclusive interview with WWD at the Martinez hotel on Thursday, at the festival kickoff, the actress joked that Smith is plotting to create a jury scandal.
“He was saying we need one, because every year there’s a controversy. So we’re thinking maybe we’ll create one,” laughed the actress adding that, in reality, “it’s such a good chemistry, I don’t think anyone’s difficult. So far everyone’s been so lovely.”
It’s been a meteoric ascent for Chastain, who first attended the festival as a relative unknown in 2011, for Terrence Malick’s “The Tree of Life,” which won the Palme d’Or. But she’s holding on for the ride. “Holding hands with Brad Pitt and Sean Penn was my introduction to the world as an actress — changed my life 100 percent,” she said.
“In 2011, I remember right before coming here they asked me if I’d do a photo shoot for a Cannes issue with Elizabeth Olsen. My movies hadn’t yet come out, and it was this new actresses thing. And this year, they invited me to

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Stars Gather for Vanity Fair Bash in Cannes

Drawing a heady constellation of players from the worlds of entertainment and politics, Vanity Fair’s Saturday night bash with HBO, held at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes, France, lived up to its golden-ticket status.
Guests including Clint Eastwood, Tilda Swinton, Emma Thompson, Al Gore, Ben Stiller, Julianne Moore and Jake Gyllenhaal dined on artichoke risotto and roasted blue lobster before descending to the restaurant’s lower deck for the after party, cohosted with Chopard. Serenaded by a soundtrack of crooner classics that enhanced the “Great Gatsby” mood, the revelers spilled out onto the terrace with colored lights illuminating the trees and super-yachts bobbing on the horizon. Waiters circled, proffering boxes of cigars and foie gras bites.
The event marked the 70th anniversary of the Cannes Film Festival.
Dressed in a black gown with a dramatic train by Ralph & Russo, Arizona Muse gazed at the infinity pool, which — in keeping with tradition — had Vanity Fair spelled out across its surface in red letters. “I just can’t work out how those letters stay straight. How is the Vanity Fair floating and not moving? It’s a mystery. Anything else in a pool kind of floats away at all angles and just disappears,” she marveled. “The

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First Look: Patricia Field’s Disco-Inspired Costumes for Rioult Dance NY

Choreographer Pascal Rioult’s latest work, “Fire in the Sky,” is an artistic interpretation of his life in the world of dance. Set to the music of Deep Purple, the modern dance production features whimsical costumes by Patricia Field.
“This is the music that I danced to in the Seventies in clubs,” explains Rioult, who founded Rioult Dance NY in 1994. “The journey to becoming a professional dancer and choreographer and artistic director really started in those clubs.”
While the French-born Riolt was inspired by rock ‘n’ roll, Field took a more disco approach to the costume designs, which incorporate a generous amount of neon and sequins. “Disco was one of those eras when people were happy and dancing,” says Field. “That was part of my inspiration [for this show] — the idea of when people are happy they dance. The colors go along with that because when people are happy they wear color.”

Patricia Field’s sketches for Rioult Dance NY.
Courtesy Patricia Field

The former “Sex and the City” costumer, known for her liberal use of bold colors and wild patterns in her personal wardrobe, drew from a palette of pinks, oranges, blues and metallic tones in dressing the show’s 12-person ensemble. “The colors are happy

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Arnold Schwarzenegger on Waltzing With Sylvester Stallone

Who knew Arnold Schwarzenegger was so light on his feet? Joining industry movers and shakers at the Charles Finch Cannes Filmmakers dinner on Friday at the Hôtel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes, the former governor of California chose dancing with Sylvester Stallone as one of his favorite memories from Cannes.
“We danced the waltz,” said Schwarzenegger, dressed in a seersucker jacket, pants and Adidas sneakers. “It was 1991, I believe. Sylvester was here for a film, and I was promoting ‘Terminator 2: Judgment Day,’ and up until that point we didn’t really hit it off well. We were very competitive, and trying to derail each other at every angle and every possibility. And then, somehow, because we were working for the same company, we hugged at a party right about here. The Gipsy Kings were playing and we were holding onto each other and they said, ‘Do you want to dance?’ and he says, ‘Yeah.’ And so we were dancing, we were waltzing, around and around and around. Then we all of a sudden stopped and he said, ‘God damn it, you’re leading, I hate that,’” laughed Schwarzenegger who is town to promote the feature documentary he narrates: “Wonders of the Sea 3D,” co-directed by

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The Modist Fetes Malone Souliers in Dubai

DUBAI — “Women in the Middle East have a lot of fun with accessories. We all love a fabulous hero item,” said Sasha Sarokin, buying and fashion director at The Modist, one of the most buzzed about new retail concepts from the region that launched in March.
The luxury shopping portal, pronounced mode-ist, is dedicated to women who wish to dress modestly. In just two short months, the retailer has created a new chapter that offers a fresh perspective on modest dressing. “I am a Modist woman and you may be, too. That’s the truth of it. Most of the time I can be a bit more demure,” Sarokin said.
The edit of brands includes everything from ready-to-wear to apparel and shoes. Sarokin said: “I haven’t approached the biggest of the big. I wanted to bring the new and exciting and the whimsical, fun and fabulous.”
Enter Malone Souliers, the footwear brand from creative director Mary Alice Malone and managing director Roy Luwolt. The Modist welcomed the duo in Dubai this week for a celebration in a warehouse space that was transformed into a beautiful salon where guests could try on and order the brands signature strappy flats with pointed toe, lace-up heels and cutaway

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Whatever Happened to the Boys of No Doubt?

On an afternoon earlier this week while coming back from a rooftop photo shoot at the Sony Tower overlooking Madison Square Park in Manhattan, musicians Davey Havok, Tony Kanal, Adrian Young and Tom Dumont get out of the elevator on their floor, leaving in their wake a frenzy.
“Oh my god — were they in No Doubt?”
Yes, it’s been over 20 years since “Tragic Kingdom,” the band’s third album, put them on the map with songs like “Don’t Speak.” And while lead vocalist Gwen Stefani has now gone her own way — most recently as a judge on “The Voice” — the enthusiasm for the band (and its members) has clearly not died.
The men of the group — Kanal, Young and Dumont — have spent the past three years putting together an album in secrecy with new frontman Havok, of bands AFI, Blaqk Audio and XTRMST, for a new group called Dreamcar. The finished product, a namesake debut album of Eighties-leaning pop-rock songs, was released March 12; the band performs in New York tonight.
“The whole thing was an opportunity for us just to create and have fun,” says Havok, seated around a picnic table on the Sony roof with his

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Oscar-Winning Director Kathryn Bigelow Off-loads TriBeCa Loft in Former Film Production Studio

Double-Oscar winning “Hurt Locker” producer and director Kathryn Bigelow must have really wanted to off-load her TriBeCa apartment as it appears that she’s made a loss on the trendy loft.
The 65-year-old, who made history when she became the first woman to win an Oscar for best director and whose other credits include “Zero Dark Thirty” starring Jessica Chastain, put it on the market for $2.89 million in January and lowered that to $2.75 million in March after failing to find a buyer, according to listing records.
That move has appeared to do the trick as the two bedroom, two bathroom condo entered contract this week. However, while the final sale price won’t be made public until the deal hits city property records, it seems likely that Bigelow will have made a loss on the condo as she paid over $3 million for it in 2015.

Kathryn Bigelow’s TriBeCa Loft.

The 1,665-square-foot apartment is located at 449 Washington Street, a discreet four-unit doorman building on one of TriBeCa’s cobbled streets, which was newly completed when Bigelow purchased the apartment. The century-old brick building itself at one point served as a former film production studio so it’s pretty fitting that she bought there.
Features of her spread include a private elevator landing, 10-foot

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Christian Louboutin on His Roundabout Route to Shoe Design

NEW YORK — Synonymous as his name is with the red-soled sky-high shoes he designs, Christian Louboutin needed no sense of grandeur in describing his own famed life.
In a lengthy question-and-answer session at 92Y with Fern Mallis, he illustrated how an imaginative, mature and impatient boy in Paris wound up being one of the world’s most recognized shoe designers. Put off by the perennial what-would-you-like-to-be-when-you-grow-up question, he simply lied, telling adults, “I want to design shoes,” never thinking it was a real job.
Although a drawing of a high-heeled shoe in a Paris museum was an image that stayed with him for a long time, it wasn’t until years later that the gift of a retrospective book about Roger Vivier (whom he’d never heard of) crystallized his career plans. From that day on, “I really decided it could be and it should be my job,” Louboutin said. “I was all about shoes; I was not about fashion. I had cinema and music but not fashion. When I first started I wanted to design shoes for showgirls.”
After showing his shoe sketches to Folies Bergère, (which he started sneaking into with friends at the age of 12), he was hired as an intern. “But it

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