Beauty Headlines

Shiseido Targets Young Women With Limited-Time Cosmetics Brands

TOKYO — Shiseido has announced a new project that aims to respond quickly to trends in the market for young women in Japan by launching a series of limited-time cosmetics brands and products. By releasing various lines with different points of view in quick succession, the Japanese beauty giant hopes to be able to feed into a wide variety of fashion and beauty trends, appeal to different customer preferences and keep pace with a fast-changing market.
Called Cosmetic Press, the project will launch a series of limited-edition cosmetics brands, each with a unique concept and products. Once the products for a given label sell out, they will not be sold again, and instead entirely new brands and products will hit the market.

The first brand being released as a part of the project is called Ice Cream Parlour Cosmetics, which includes four products in a total of 19 colors. As the name implies, the brand is inspired by ice cream flavors and features a base makeup in “white vanilla” and eye shadows in shades such as “kiwi wink,” “banana shake” and “apple berry.” Shiseido said the line was developed in response to 2018 trends including pastel and vivid colors, and a desire to

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London fashion week storms the palace (and the galleries)

Buckingham Palace showcases Commonwealth talent as Erdem portrays ruling-class glamour

Erdem snaked a catwalk through the National Portrait Gallery, Christopher Kane commandeered Tate Britain, Jasper Conran hosted his guests at Claridge’s, but the contest for most glamorous venue for London fashion week was over the moment the Duchess of Cambridge sent out invitations for a reception for the Commonwealth fashion industry at Buckingham Palace.

Monday evening’s event was in honour not of a single star name, but of the scope of design talent and craftsmanship across the Commonwealth. Fashion labels including Burberry and Stella McCartney, as well as New Zealand designer Karen Walker and Bibi Russell from Bangladesh, were partnered with craftspeople from countries with which they had never previously worked and challenged to make a collaborative dress. From the palace, the dresses will travel to Australia House, where a public exhibition will be curated by Vogue’s Hamish Bowles.

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Baftas red carpet sees a blackout as women turn light towards equality

Angelina Jolie was one of many actors who brought an activist as her date, while Saoirse Ronan and Salma Hayek were among those who wore black, as fashion became a vehicle for female solidarity

The red carpet was a less colourful place at this year’s Baftas than it used to be, but a much more vibrant and interesting one.

An open letter signed by 190 actors, including Emma Watson, had called on women in the film industry to wear black and to “use our power as communicators and connectors to shift the way society sees and treats us. We need to examine the kind of womanhood our industry promotes and sells to the world.” The all-black dress code was followed by almost all attendees – though the most high-profile woman of all, the Duchess of Cambridge, was a notable exception in a dark olive gown.

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Philip Green considers selling Arcadia to Chinese textiles giant

Shandong Ruyi looks over books of retail group, thought likely to fetch half its £1bn valuation

Sir Philip Green is thought to be considering the sale of his Topshop-to-Burton empire Arcadia as a Chinese textiles giant reportedly looks over its books.

Green is thought to be seeking an exit from the group as his ageing, poor-performing brands including Dorothy Perkins, Wallis and Evans come under attack from fast-expanding online players such as Boohoo and Missguided.

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Designer label Preen launches collection starting at just 65p

Catwalk label’s postage stamp collection features Finella dress worn by Duchess of Cambridge

Preen, the catwalk label designed by the husband and wife team Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi and worn by the Duchess of Cambridge and Gwyneth Paltrow, has launched London fashion week’s most affordable collection, with prices starting at just 65p.

However, the bargain buys are the size of a postage stamp – literally. A six-stamp collection celebrating 20 years of the brand has been issued by the Isle of Man, where both Thornton and Bregazzi grew up. The first-class stamp features the red Finella dress worn by the duchess on a royal tour of Canada. The bodycon “Power Dress” that first made the label famous is honoured on another of the stamps.

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Designer label Preen launches collection starting at just 65p

Catwalk label’s postage stamp collection features Finella dress worn by Duchess of Cambridge

Preen, the catwalk label designed by the husband and wife team Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi and worn by the Duchess of Cambridge and Gwyneth Paltrow, has launched London fashion week’s most affordable collection, with prices starting at just 65p.

However, the bargain buys are the size of a postage stamp – literally. A six-stamp collection celebrating 20 years of the brand has been issued by the Isle of Man, where both Thornton and Bregazzi grew up. The first-class stamp features the red Finella dress worn by the duchess on a royal tour of Canada. The bodycon “Power Dress” that first made the label famous is honoured on another of the stamps.

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Designer label Preen launches collection starting at just 65p

Catwalk label’s postage stamp collection features Finella dress worn by Duchess of Cambridge

Preen, the catwalk label designed by the husband and wife team Justin Thornton and Thea Bregazzi and worn by the Duchess of Cambridge and Gwyneth Paltrow, has launched London fashion week’s most affordable collection, with prices starting at just 65p.

However, the bargain buys are the size of a postage stamp – literally. A six-stamp collection celebrating 20 years of the brand has been issued by the Isle of Man, where both Thornton and Bregazzi grew up. The first-class stamp features the red Finella dress worn by the duchess on a royal tour of Canada. The bodycon “Power Dress” that first made the label famous is honoured on another of the stamps.

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The big picture: London Fashion Week, February 1998

With the 2018 event now in full swing, we revisit a telling Martin Parr shot from 20 years ago

Martin Parr is the kind of quick-witted photographer who catches life on the run, his shutter clicking faster than the human eye can blink. To coincide with London Fashion Week, which began last Friday, here is a deft act of espionage from backstage at the same event 20 years ago. Parr probably didn’t know what he’d snatched until he developed the film and saw that the flustered accidents of a moment had come to rest in a parable, showing how the beauty industry goes about its tortuous, tormenting work.

Makeup has already transformed the model into a doll: the waxen complexion, with a sickly jaundiced tone around the eyes, and the pursed, painted lips that are smaller and more infantile than her own. Now the hairdressers take over, knotting and coiling and pinning and teasing, with a can of eco-unfriendly aerosol spray ready to freeze her mane. They are technicians, busy on the assembly line; she is their manufactured product, as glassy-eyed as the lens of Parr’s camera.

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The big picture: London Fashion Week, February 1998

With the 2018 event now in full swing, we revisit a telling Martin Parr shot from 20 years ago

Martin Parr is the kind of quick-witted photographer who catches life on the run, his shutter clicking faster than the human eye can blink. To coincide with London Fashion Week, which began last Friday, here is a deft act of espionage from backstage at the same event 20 years ago. Parr probably didn’t know what he’d snatched until he developed the film and saw that the flustered accidents of a moment had come to rest in a parable, showing how the beauty industry goes about its tortuous, tormenting work.

Makeup has already transformed the model into a doll: the waxen complexion, with a sickly jaundiced tone around the eyes, and the pursed, painted lips that are smaller and more infantile than her own. Now the hairdressers take over, knotting and coiling and pinning and teasing, with a can of eco-unfriendly aerosol spray ready to freeze her mane. They are technicians, busy on the assembly line; she is their manufactured product, as glassy-eyed as the lens of Parr’s camera.

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The big picture: London Fashion Week, February 1998

With the 2018 event now in full swing, we revisit a telling Martin Parr shot from 20 years ago

Martin Parr is the kind of quick-witted photographer who catches life on the run, his shutter clicking faster than the human eye can blink. To coincide with London Fashion Week, which began last Friday, here is a deft act of espionage from backstage at the same event 20 years ago. Parr probably didn’t know what he’d snatched until he developed the film and saw that the flustered accidents of a moment had come to rest in a parable, showing how the beauty industry goes about its tortuous, tormenting work.

Makeup has already transformed the model into a doll: the waxen complexion, with a sickly jaundiced tone around the eyes, and the pursed, painted lips that are smaller and more infantile than her own. Now the hairdressers take over, knotting and coiling and pinning and teasing, with a can of eco-unfriendly aerosol spray ready to freeze her mane. They are technicians, busy on the assembly line; she is their manufactured product, as glassy-eyed as the lens of Parr’s camera.

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Michael Halpern dazzles London Fashion Week with platforms and sequins

The spotlight falls on the designer with a vision is to provide a moment of escapism in dark times

The question of where fashion sits within the ongoing post-Weinstein cultural awakening feels more pertinent than ever this weekend. Patrick Demarchelier, Princess Diana’s personal fashion photographer, has denied sexual misconduct accusations. A proposed all-black dress code in support of Time’s Up, the campaign against sexual harassment, will dominate the red carpet at the Bafta awards, an international event that falls in the middle of this week’s London shows.

For the New York designer Michael Halpern, 30, the timing is perfect. His London-based label Halpern, a cavalcade of sequins and colour, is currently one of the most popular in womenswear. “This idea of inappropriate glamour, or of questioning what is too much in fashion, or goes too far…” Halpern told the Observer, “What’s going on in with women and politics has pushed me to want to make a statement with what I design.

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Christopher Bailey bows out from Burberry under a bold rainbow

An adventurous last show from the form-breaking British designer who reinvented Burberry

For 17 years at Burberry, Christopher Bailey has rejoiced in rain. It is, after all, both quintessential British weather and the perfect setting for a trenchcoat. But for his last catwalk show for London Fashion Week’s biggest brand, the sun came out and Bailey’s reign ended beneath a rainbow.

The show opened with Adwoa Aboah in rainbow stripes on a white silk skirt and closed with Cara Delevingne under a rainbow fake fur coat. Puffa jackets and hi-top trainers came with rainbow stripes, and a trenchcoat and a blanket cape in a technicolour version of the distinctive beige check. This season the Burberry check is rainbow-hued, a symbol of the firm’s financial support for LGBTQ+ charities.

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The beauty bargains that beat the luxury brands | Sali Hughes

From micellar water to liquid eyeliner, these top-quality products are a fraction of the price of luxury brands

I try almost every new micellar cleansing water that comes on to the market, simply because I get through gallons of the stuff. I use it as an eye makeup remover; for sweeping away the hundreds of stripes and smears of testing makeup drawn on my hands each week; for removing the bulk of makeup before proper night-time face cleansing with a balm; for overtired, tipsy cleansing from the comfort of my own bed; and for swift, neat lipstick changes on shoots.

I have tried hundreds, from dirt cheap to silly expensive, and Simple’s Water Boost micellar cleansing water (£6.99 for a huge 400ml bottle) is the best at any price. Here is why: unlike many micellars, it doesn’t give me spots. If ever I am testing anti‑blemish treatments on my dry, normally clear face and I use an inferior micellar for a few days, a spot or two will materialise. Not with this – however frequently I use it. It removes everything, even stubborn matte lip stains, with ease. It leaves my skin neither greasy nor tight. It is cheap enough to be used lavishly and has a proper squirty bottle instead of the stupid, wasteful and messy pump dispensers favoured by several luxury brands. At this stage, I see no reason why anyone would pay more.

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Anti-fur protests set to fly as activists target London fashion week

Animal rights campaigners plan largest demonstrations in decade as designers move away from fur

Boosted by the vogue for veganism, animal rights activists plan to target London fashion week this weekend with the largest fur protests seen at the event in a decade. Ed Winters, the co-director of Surge, which orchestrated anti-fur demonstrations that attractedmore than 250 people in September, a rise from 120 the previous catwalk season and 25 in September 2016, said “we expect those numbers to continually rise” .

There is, however, unlikely to be much fur on the catwalks. Over 90% of designers taking part in LFW have confirmed to the British Fashion Council (BFC) that they will not be using fur. But research by the University of Copenhagen reports retail sales of fur in the UK in 2016 were £162m, up 350% from 2011, as inexpensive real fur has become commonplace in fast fashion.

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What I wore this week: a turtle neck

The polo neck can’t stay in fashion for ever, so prepare for the inevitable with this sleeker, sportier alternative

What did we wear before polo necks were a thing? It gives me neck chills just thinking about it. A cravat? Seems unlikely, but I cannot honestly remember. I have worn a polo neck, either by itself or as a base layer under a shirt or dress, pretty much every other day this winter and last and the one before that. A polo neck is cosy without being bulky, modern without being mannered. It just works.

At some point, the polo neck will be over and I need to prepare myself for this eventuality. It will fade from favour, slip down the ratings from on-point to passable until we reach the day when bumping into someone you know while wearing one is borderline awks. Like getting spotted in Uggs. (A dog comes in handy here. Seriously, you can get away with wearing any old tat if you are walking a dog. A year and a half into dog ownership, I can report confidently that even if you look like you styled your outfit while escaping a burning building, no one will judge you if you have got a cockapoo with you. I don’t know why this is. It is not like a dog gets to spring a walk on you. Anyway.)

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